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Concord Grapes

Roxy's picture

Concord Grapes (post #63676)

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Hello again everyone!!


I have a large bag of concord grapes and was hoping to make a nice pie or tart.  I hear these grapes are beautiful in pastry.  But, I've been having a hard time finding a good recipe. 


Does anyone have a good recipe they've tried?  Or if you have another suggestion as to how to use these up let me know!!


Thanks,


Roxy

Adele's picture

(post #63676, reply #1 of 16)

You could try making grape jelly if the bag's big enough.  Do concord grapes have seeds?  Might be a PITA to make a pie.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

venturedone's picture

(post #63676, reply #2 of 16)

It is.  I dearly love Concord grap pie, but I finally deep-sixed the recipe so that I wouldn't be tempted to make it again. 

 


Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

 

Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

Roxy's picture

(post #63676, reply #3 of 16)

Thank goodness this particular bunch doesn't have seeds.  Jam is a good idea...but I'm still hoping that someone has a nice recipe fore me!


Keeping my fingers crossed :o)

venturedone's picture

(post #63676, reply #4 of 16)

Well, I just googled and found that there is a seedless Concord grape available now in limited supply.  Darn.  I wish I had access.  And I wish I hadn't deep-sixed my recipe!  I do wonder if the seedless variety is as flavorful as the orginal.   For me, it's one of those sensory memories that brings back childhood--warm Concord grapes right off the vine.  Yum!

 


Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

 

Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

deejeh's picture

(post #63676, reply #5 of 16)

I bet these grapes would be fabulous used in the sweet foccacia with grapes that's been mentioned here.  There's a recipe in the "No Need to Knead" book, where she roasts the grapes first, and I'm pretty sure there's also a recipe in "The Italian Baker."


deej

Roxy's picture

(post #63676, reply #7 of 16)

I prefer the seedless variety. I had no idea that they weren't common though. But, I do live in the Okanagan Valley, BC and we have many vineyards & wine.  I guess I've been spoiled by having access to these little guys.


It's so nice to eat them as a snack and not have to worry about crunching into any of those darn seeds!  I stocked up because it is now end of season for them.  


Roxy 


 

venturedone's picture

(post #63676, reply #9 of 16)

As a child I developed a technique for eating grapes with seeds in them--bite, but not too hard (pretty vague <L>) so I never have the crunch problem.  My husband, on the other end of the spectrum of Concord grape eaters, spits out the seeds AND the skins!

 


Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

 

Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

Roxy's picture

(post #63676, reply #10 of 16)

Spits out the seeds and the skins?  That's hilarious! I mean what's the point of even eating a grape?  I guess we all have our own ways of doing things...


At least your husband eats fruit! My hubby grew up without eating any fruit.  I was lucky we always had fresh fruit in the house.  When he & I first went to the grocery store he kept pointing to all the produce asking, "what's that?"....to make a long story short....he's come a long way.  He's eating more and more fruit...especially when I hide fruits and veggies in my cooking.  Sometimes it's like cooking for a child because there's still some produce he's not too fond of!! :o)


But I'm sneaky!!

venturedone's picture

(post #63676, reply #11 of 16)

I used to try hiding eggplant or turnips in stews etc. but he found them each and every time, so I had to promise not to do it again.  I was successful in slipping some roasted parsnips into a soup recently.  <G>

 


Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

 

Harebrained lagomorph, prestidigitations exist for pre-adolescents.

elizaram's picture

(post #63676, reply #12 of 16)

Are we all married to the same man? LOL!!



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

Roxy's picture

(post #63676, reply #14 of 16)

Once in awhile my hubby finds the veggies too! But I still like to think I'm pretty sneaky and most of the time he has no idea!! HA!


Lasagne is a great one to hide assorted veggies in! :o)

Marcia's picture

(post #63676, reply #13 of 16)

Until fairly modern times, most all grapes had very tough skins, and people thought they were indigestable, and would spit them out. Eating grape skins is pretty new. Lots of fruit was cooked, too. DH and I were lucky to grow up with lots of fruit and veggies.


I love foxy grapes, especially Scuppernong which I haven't had in years. Oh, they're luscious....

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63676, reply #15 of 16)

In good years there's a big crop of wild muscadines at the lake.  Have to climb a tree to pick them, but they're soooo good.


Tough skins and big seeds, but we love them.


Leigh


 


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Marcia's picture

(post #63676, reply #16 of 16)

It's nice to have the muscadines, even if you do have to climb a tree. After growing up with them, I find supermarket grapes too tame.


Edited to say: I believe scuppernong and muscadines are pretty much the same, if not identical. There are different varieties, some with light skin and some with dark.


Edited 10/21/2005 5:34 pm ET by Marcia

doyenne's picture

(post #63676, reply #6 of 16)

Haven't tried this but it was in the NYTimes on 10/12 and sounds good.


October 12, 2005


Recipe: Concord Grape Clafoutis

Adapted from Pierre Reboul, Thor


Time: 1 hour 45 minutes, plus cooling


8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened
1 pound Concord grapes, stemmed and rinsed
1½ cups confectioners' sugar, plus 1 tablespoon
1¾ cups almond flour or finely ground almonds
2 tablespoons cookie crumbs
Pinch salt
2 eggs
¼ cup heavy cream.


1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9-inch cake pan with 1 tablespoon butter. Gently squeeze each grape into a bowl, slipping off skin. Using skewer or toothpick, puncture each grape and push out the seeds and discard them.


2. In an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, cream remaining butter. Add 1½ cups confectioners' sugar, and beat until incorporated. Beat in almond flour, cookie crumbs and salt.


3. In a small bowl, whisk together eggs and cream. With mixer set on medium speed, gradually add egg mixture to butter mixture, beating until just smooth.


4. Transfer batter to prepared cake pan. Spoon grapes and any accumulated juices over batter. Sift remaining tablespoon of confectioners' sugar over cake. Bake until golden and firm in center, 45 to 50 minutes. Let cool before serving.


Yield: 6 servings.






 


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Roxy's picture

(post #63676, reply #8 of 16)

Thank you so much for submitting the recipe!  It looks really interesting and not too difficult. I can't wait to give it a go. 


I'll let you know how it turns out :o)


Roxy