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Clafouti help

SallyBR1's picture

Clafouti help (post #63515)

in

I made a cherry clafouti yesterday, because I am stubborn and insist that I can bake, when obviously I should not be allowed to

Recipe was from Joy of Cooking, very simple, seemed like an ape could do it

4 eggs
3/4 cup sugar

beat for 2 minutes until frothy

add 1 cup milk, 1 tsp vanilla

beat until well combined

Add 3/4 cup flour, mix until well combined

Pour over cherries placed on a pie plate, 10 inch diameter

Bake at 375 for 10 minutes, reduce heat to 350F for another 35 minutes, until well puffed.

Remove from oven, cool 20 minutes on rack - dust with powdered sugar and serve cut in wedges

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Mine did not "puff" nearly enough. The thing tasted ok, but not the way I think a clafouti should be. It was more on the heavy side.

ANy ideas?

(I beat everything by hand, it was supposed to be a quick, easy dessert and I did not want to drag the KA out)

Jean's picture

(post #63515, reply #1 of 70)

My suggestion is to leave the KA on your counter at all times. :)

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Marcia's picture

(post #63515, reply #2 of 70)

I haven't made a clafouti in years, but always used Julia's recipe in Mastering. I don't remember it puffing up a lot, and they are supposed to be a little heavy. Did you bake in a water bath?


I am in the minority here, I expect, but I don't trust Joy.

doyenne's picture

(post #63515, reply #3 of 70)

Sally, I use Paul Bocuse's recipe. No Ka needed.


Cherry Clafoutis


1 pound dark, ripe cherries


1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder


1 3/4 cups flour


3 eggs


1/4 cup sugar


1/2 cup milk


pinch of salt


2 tablespoons butter ( for the pan )


sugar ( to finish )


Preheat oven to 400 degrees.


Wash and dry the cherries. Do not pit them.* Reserve.


Mix the baking powder and flour together in a mixing bowl, then push it up against the sides of the bowl to form a well in the center. Break the eggs into the well, add the sugar, milk and salt, and stir, mixing the flour in as it falls from the sides. The finished batter should be smooth; if there are any lumps, work the batter through a sieve to eliminate them.


Butter a 10" pie or cake pan ( preferably porcelain ). Stir the cherries into the batter, then pour it into the pan and bake for 45 minutes to an hour. When golden brown , remove the clafoutis from the oven and sprinkle with the sugar. Serve hot ot cold in the pan.


From Paul Bocuse In Your Kitchen. 1982


* I pit the cherries.  ( And I use an Apilco quiche dish. )


 

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DeannaS's picture

(post #63515, reply #4 of 70)

I've only made one and it was a Martha recipe. It didn't puff - it was almost like a thick pancake to me, sort of. I wasn't really all that impressed. You might just be like me - not that impressed with clafouti.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

sommersu's picture

(post #63515, reply #5 of 70)

I've made pear clafoutis and cranberry..both had a custard like consistency..I wouldn't compare them to a pancake..I'm a fan.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63515, reply #6 of 70)

I have used this formula.  It puffs on the ouside and is custard-like in the middle.


1/2 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/3 cup plus 2 teaspoons granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Pinch of salt
3 eggs plus 1 egg yolk
1 cup milk

Lexi's picture

(post #63515, reply #10 of 70)

I've not tried cranberry clafoutis.  It sounds delicious.  Did you use FC's basic recipe?

 

 

sandermom's picture

(post #63515, reply #11 of 70)

I made clafoutis with seedless black grapes once...really very nice; subtle.

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Marcia's picture

(post #63515, reply #14 of 70)

My husband and I are not great clafouti fans, either. There are so many wonderful cherry tarts and other goodies that we enjoy more. Many of our friends adore them - just different tastes.

ouzo's picture

(post #63515, reply #7 of 70)

FC covered clafoutis in March 2000 #37. I make them all the time and everyone is delighted.

A few years back I read 'On Rue Tatin' by Susan Herrmann Loomis. In it, she includes a recipe for pear clafoutis in which she whips the egg whites separately. I've not used tried the this technique mostly because the FC recipes are so foolproof and delicious. The author's story about how she came across the recipe is worth reading.

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Lexi's picture

(post #63515, reply #8 of 70)

The recipe in FC is the best one I've ever had, and I've tried lots of recipes.  

 

 

cookie1's picture

(post #63515, reply #13 of 70)

Would you be so kind to post the recipe?!

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Lexi's picture

(post #63515, reply #18 of 70)

I posted it on an earlier clafoutis thread.  Let me know if you can't find it.

 

 

Marcia's picture

(post #63515, reply #15 of 70)

I enjoyed the Loomis book, too, and have several of her cookbooks, which I quite like.

Lexi's picture

(post #63515, reply #9 of 70)

I tried the recipe in Joy, and, IMO, it's not a very good one.  Try the one from FC that another poster mentioned upthread substituting cherries for the pears. 


BTW, you were right not to use your KA.  Making a clafoutis is like making pancake batter; it's best to whisk the ingredients together by hand just until combined so as not to develop the gluten in the flour.   


 

 

Glenys's picture

(post #63515, reply #12 of 70)

Or go the extreme opposite route, whiz the whole thing sans fruit in the blender and sit for at least two hours, like crêpes.

Lexi's picture

(post #63515, reply #17 of 70)

I sometimes do that.

 

 

ashleyd's picture

(post #63515, reply #16 of 70)

I've had clafoutis several times in different restaurants and even made it myself, because it always looks like it's going to be terrific. And I've always been disappointed. It's OK but never really lives up to its promise, although as somebody else says in this thread, different tastes. Probably best find another quick and easy dessert.


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courgette's picture

(post #63515, reply #19 of 70)

That's the way I feel about Key Lime Pie. I've never had one that tasted the way I thought it should or at the the way I imagine it to taste. I've given up on it. Just not my cup of tea, I guess.

MadMom's picture

(post #63515, reply #20 of 70)

Have you ever tried my recipe?  It's dead easy, and if you don't like it, you probably just don't like Key Lime Pie, LOL.



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Lexi's picture

(post #63515, reply #22 of 70)

There is a shop on Marathon Key that's supposed to have the best key lime pie in the country.  It's very good, but the best we've ever had was at a seafood restaurant in Key Largo.  One of the waitresses used to make them, but wouldn't give out the recipe.  I'm sure that she folded either whipped cream or beaten egg whites into the filling, which was lighter and taller than the standard filling.  It was also served slightly frozen, which made it even better.  We had a vacation home in Key West for years, and loved to drive down from the mainland.  We always stopped for that pie.


Is your recipe posted anywhere?    


 

 

ashleyd's picture

(post #63515, reply #23 of 70)

I've tried that shop on Marathon (we have a timeshare apartment there) and it's better than most, but still something that disappoints.


“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
Napoleon Bonaparte

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Lexi's picture

(post #63515, reply #27 of 70)

I'm a big fan of key lime pie and enjoy different versions, but I've also been disappointed many times -- too sour, too dense, too sweet, etc.  I think I prefer an airier version, and I do love it when it's slightly frozen; it reminds me of a semi freddo.  Wolfie's restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale (a blessed memory) made wonderful key lime pie, and the Half Shell in Key West serves my second favorite version.  I ordered a key lime mousse tart last week at a restaurant in Chicago that was absolutely delicious.  What is it that you are looking for in the pie that you haven't yet found?

 

 

doyenne's picture

(post #63515, reply #28 of 70)

Key lime pie is one of my favourites. A long, long time ago, I spent a week at Pier House in Key West when it first opened and actually had 3 pieces of Key lime pie a day. In those years, Pier House had the best one closely followed by the one at  Louie's Backyard. ( I actually lost 5 pounds that week because I walked everywhere. ) There also used to be a restaurant in Coral Gables that had a good one. I think it was called My Brother's Place. I think I'm havving a Proustian moment.


When I make it I use the same recipe that MadMom uses either with or without whipped cream topping but never with meringue. When I can get Key limes I use them and, as Tracy says, NEVER that awful bottled stuff. I've also learned to avoid any Key lime pie that is bright green.


 

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TracyK's picture

(post #63515, reply #29 of 70)

Charlotte, have you ever made it with a chocolate crumb crust? Heaven.

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       -- Carrie Bradshaw

doyenne's picture

(post #63515, reply #31 of 70)

As they say, what could be bad?


 

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MadMom's picture

(post #63515, reply #30 of 70)

Amen!  BTW, I have a recipe for a key lime mousse pie which might be more to some people's tastes, if anyone wants me to post it.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

doyenne's picture

(post #63515, reply #32 of 70)

I 'd like the recipe please. Tell me, if you use eggplant in it is it Key lime moussaka? Sorry, I couldn't resist. It's been a whacko day.


 

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MadMom's picture

(post #63515, reply #34 of 70)

Light Key Lime Pie
(Recipe by Pam Anderson)


4 large egg yolks, plus 1 large egg white
1 can (14 oz) sweetened condensed milk
1 Tbsp cornstarch
2 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp grated lime zest
10 T fresh lime juice
1/8 tsp salt
1 prebaked Graham Cracker crust


Adjust oven rack to lower middle position and preheat to 300 degrees F.


Whisking constantly, heat yolks and half of condensed milk in a small sauce pan over low heat until mixture reaches 160 degrees F.  Turn off heat and stir in rest of condensed milk to keep eggs from curdling.  Pour mixture into a medium bowl and set aside.


Whisking constantly, heat cornstarch and 1/3 cup water in a small saucepan over low heat until clear and thick, 2 to 3 minutes.  Remove from heat and set aside.


With a hand mixer, beat egg white on medium speed until foamy.  While gradually adding sugar, beat egg white until it's glossy and soft peaks form.  Add half of thickened cornstarch mixture to egg white and beat until just incorporated.  Discard remaining thickened cornstarch.


Mix zest, lime juice, and salt, then beat into egg-milk mixture until well incorporated.  Fold in egg white, then pour into prepared crust.


Bake until set but still jiggly at the center, 20 to 22 minutes.  Cool to room temperature on a rack, then refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours.  Serve.


Note - this makes a good pie, but it isn't my idea of a "key lime pie."


 




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
doyenne's picture

(post #63515, reply #38 of 70)

Thanks. I agree it's not a Key lime pie but it sounds as though it would be good to serve without the crust. It would also probably make a good cake filling.

 

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