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Caved-in Bread Machine Loaf

TracyK's picture

Hey there-- Since I am currently without an oven (see "Blowing up the Stove" thread in Ipke), I made a loaf of plain white bread in the bread machine last night, for the first time in about 4 years. The recipe called for 1 1/2 tsp of yeast, and the packets of yeast said they measured 1 1/4 tsp, so I opened another packet and added an extra 1/4 tsp.


Everything was going along swimmingly until I noticed that the top of the bread, which had fluffed up so nicely, had caved in upon itself, leaving me with a final product that had a sinkhole in the center. Bread tasted OK but the texture was, as you might imagine, somewhat lacking.


Any idea what happened? Perhaps it over-rose? Perhaps I shouldn't have added the additional yeast?


All in all, this has not inspired me to deviate from my original plan of getting rid of the bread machine once I get a KitchenAid.



That's just bad pigs.

Jean's picture

(post #63317, reply #1 of 15)

Adjust dough consistency ? Too wet?
Use room temperature water.
Maybe too much yeast.
 


Just a couple of guesses. What do I know?


Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


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FitnessNut's picture

(post #63317, reply #2 of 15)

Don't those little packets have 1 1/4 TABLESPOONS of yeast in them? Or at least they used to.....

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell

Follow your bliss ~~ Joseph Campbell
TracyK's picture

(post #63317, reply #4 of 15)

Egads, I don't think so! That would be far too much yeast for one application, which is kind of the point of the packets... I've never seen anything call for 1 1/4 Tbsp of yeast, I don't think.


That's just bad pigs.

Li's picture

(post #63317, reply #8 of 15)

I had a bread machine disaster this weekend, too, but it was definitely pilot error. I put the basket in wrong, so nothing got stirred, and I wound up with a disgusting half-raw, half-burnt lump. Second loaf worked, but how embarrassing (I'd just given a detailed and, yes, snotty lecture about ingredients and measuring to DH, who is more than slightly challenged when it comes to cooking. This is the man who has screwed up Kraft mac and cheese, and, God help me, ramen.)

That aside, I have a question about butter in bread machine bread: the recipe I was using was lacking in detail, especially about butter. I used unsalted, cold, for a basic white sandwich bread. Should it have been room temp? melted? salted?

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deejeh's picture

(post #63317, reply #9 of 15)

I can't speak for bread machines, since I don't have one, but any recipe I've ever seen that includes butter either has you melt it or have it at soft room temp.  HTH


deej

Jean's picture

(post #63317, reply #11 of 15)

You can use it cold if you dice it into tiny pieces...like 1/4 inch squares. Room temp is best though. (all ingredients, for that matter).

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
knitpik1's picture

(post #63317, reply #13 of 15)

Yup and if my butter is cold I just use warmer water to balance:-)

If you're using 1-1.5 Tbsp of butter it doesn't really matter but if you're using like 4 Tbsp then it does make a difference.

Li's picture

(post #63317, reply #15 of 15)

Thank you!

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Shaye's picture

(post #63317, reply #3 of 15)

I had this very same thing happen. It turns out I had put the yeast too close to the sugar or salt or something. When you put your ingredients in, put in your liquids first, then the flour. Make a little well in the flour that you put your yeast in. When you put the sugar and salt in, put them each in their own corner so they don't mix into the yeast too soon. If you're having the same problem I had that'll fix it.

TracyK's picture

(post #63317, reply #5 of 15)

I mostly did that... I think I put the salt in the water, though... perhaps that's what did it.


That's just bad pigs.

Shaye's picture

(post #63317, reply #6 of 15)

I just looked it up and the site I saw said that that problem is sometimes caused by too much yeast. I wonder if your extra 1/4 tsp was enough to make it pop...

MadMom's picture

(post #63317, reply #7 of 15)

Tracy, I always thought the yeast packets were 2 1/4 tsp...are you sure they said 1 1/4 tsp? 

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

TracyK's picture

(post #63317, reply #10 of 15)

2 1/4, you are correct... and the recipe called for 2 1/2 tsp.


That's just bad pigs.

knitpik1's picture

(post #63317, reply #12 of 15)

I agree...it could be too much water or too much yeast or too much sugar or a draft. I always have to warn DH to open the door gently when I have bread in the bread machine. Besides measuring and putting the ingredients in the right order, one still has to check on the dough about 5-8 mins after it starts kneading. If it's too wet, add a little flour and if it's too dry, add a little water until it forms a nice ball...just like using a KA or any other machine. I assume you were using bread machine yeast, correct? Try reducing the amount of yeast by 1/4 tsp and see what happens. 2 1/4 tsp for a loaf of plain white bread sounds like a lot to me. I usually use about 1 1/2 tsp for a 2lb loaf.

SondraG's picture

(post #63317, reply #14 of 15)

Yeast packet contains 2 1/4 tsps of yeast. 

Life is good....