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cake filling

dlish's picture

cake filling (post #63619)

in

Hi all, I need a bit of advice. If I fill and crumb coat a cake tonight, do you think it'll still be ok to decorate and serve on Sunday night? The filling would be the gianduia <sp?> mousse from one of the FC magazines.

I've made the devil's food cake layers already and they are tightly wrapped. I'll also soak the layers with a frangelico syrup.

Thanks!

RuthWells's picture

(post #63619, reply #1 of 26)

If the mousse contains cream, you'll want to be sure to refridge the cake after filling and crumbing.  I think it should hold fine until Sunday.  Don't forget to take pix!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63619, reply #2 of 26)

Yes, it will be fine. Even if you store it at room temperature.


Edited 8/26/2005 4:38 pm ET by CookiM0nster

Meryl's picture

(post #63619, reply #3 of 26)

Hey, CM, I thought mousse had to be refrigerated, no? Enlighten me, please. :) Cake-wise, I definitely would go with the room temp, since I find that cakes dry up in the refrigerator.



There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.


Edited 8/26/2005 5:03 pm ET by Meryl

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

dlish's picture

(post #63619, reply #4 of 26)

Thank you so much everyone! Have a great weekend!

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63619, reply #5 of 26)

"Hey, CM, I thought mousse had to be refrigerated"

Oops, it says mousse, but somehow I read ganache. It's been one of those days. If it's mousse and has eggs in it then yes, it needs to go in the fridge. If it's just chocolate, cream and nuts, then it's fine at room temperature for a couple of days.

Meryl's picture

(post #63619, reply #6 of 26)

Okay, thanks CM.;)


There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

dlish's picture

(post #63619, reply #15 of 26)

Thanks for all the advice. I ended up filling and frosting the cake on Sat. night. The filling was a mousse of hazelnut butter, chocolate and cream. I soaked the layers in a Frangelico syrup and frosted with chocolate buttercream.

I baked two 8in squares for a 4 layer cake. I didn't do that great of a job splitting the layers so I tried to even things out with the filling and frosting. I eventually got the cake to even out -- even on the top, nice squared corners. The exterior looked nice. But I was self critiquing, because the cross section was not even. Oh well. Everyone loved the cake. Dad was impressed and touched by the effort. He's great!

I will post a picture as soon as one becomes available.

helena's picture

(post #63619, reply #16 of 26)

Sounds like a big succes, that's great! And the filling sounds yummy, would you post that recipe please?

dlish's picture

(post #63619, reply #17 of 26)

The filling was from a FC issue. The article was about Hazelnut desserts (Gianduia = chocolate/hazelnut combo). The recipe was for Gianduia Mousse. The ingrediants were hazelnut butter (nuts & oil) melted bittersweet, whipped cream and vanilla.

I don't remember the issue or year (a couple of years ago). The cover article was for an easy pizza dough. Maybe the moderator can help?

Li's picture

(post #63619, reply #18 of 26)

Gianduia Mousse
Serves six.
The hazelnut butter in this quick-to-make, creamy mousse adds a bit of texture that’s a real palate pleaser. Try using this delicious mousse as a pie filling in your favorite graham cracker crust or tart crust; serve well chilled. This mousse is best when served within 6 hours of the time it’s made.

For the mousse:
6 oz. bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, finely chopped
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
2/3 cup Hazelnut Butter (see below), at room temperature
2 tsp. pure vanilla extract

For the garnish:
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
2 Tbs. finely ground toasted hazelnuts (see the Hazelnut Butter recipe below for toasting directions; grind the toasted nuts in a food processor)

Make the mousse: In a 2-qt. metal bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water, melt the chocolate, stirring with a rubber spatula until the chocolate is completely smooth. In a separate small saucepan, heat 1/2 cup of the cream over medium heat to just below the boiling point. Remove the bowl of chocolate from the pan of water and wipe the bottom and sides dry. Pour the hot cream into the melted chocolate and stir together with the spatula until well blended. Add the hazelnut butter and stir until well combined. Stir in the 2 tsp. vanilla.

In a chilled mixing bowl, using chilled beaters, beat the remaining 1 cup cream until it holds soft peaks. With a rubber spatula, fold the whipped cream into the chocolate mixture in four batches, blending thoroughly after each addition. Pour the mousse into a 1 1/2-qt. soufflé dish or serving bowl, or into individual serving bowls or glasses. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until set, at least 2 hours (or 1 hour if using it to fill profiteroles).

Make the garnish: In a chilled mixing bowl with chilled beaters, beat the 1/2 cup cream until frothy. Add the 1/2 tsp. vanilla and continue beating until the cream holds soft peaks. Pipe or spoon the whipped cream on top of the mousse. Sprinkle the chopped hazelnuts over the whipped cream and serve.

Hazelnut Butter
Yields about 1 cup.
This butter can be refrigerated in a sealed container for up to three months or frozen for up to six months. If frozen, thaw it slowly in the refrigerator overnight. Always bring the hazelnut butter to room temperature before use.

8 oz. (1 2/3 cups) hazelnuts
1/4 cup vegetable oil, such as canola or sunflower

Prepare the hazelnuts: Heat the oven to 350°F. Spread the hazelnuts in a single layer on a baking sheet and toast in the heated oven until the skins are mostly split and the nuts are light golden brown and quite fragrant, 15 to 18 minutes. Don’t overcook the nuts or they’ll become bitter.

Put the warm hazelnuts in a clean dishtowel. Fold the towel around the hazelnuts and let them steam for at least 5 minutes. Then rub the nuts in the towel to remove most of the skins (try to get at least 50% of the skins off). Let the hazelnuts sit for another 10 to 15 minutes. to cool completely. Toasted, peeled hazelnuts can be cooled and frozen in a sealed plastic container for up to three months.

Make the hazelnut butter: Put the nuts in a food processor; add the oil and pulse a few times. Then process, checking the consistency every few seconds, until the texture resembles that of natural, unhomogenized peanut butter or wet sand, 1 to 2 minutes.
—Carole Bloom, Fine Cooking #49

Central Scrutinizer; Cooks Talk moderator

Only connect.

helena's picture

(post #63619, reply #24 of 26)

Thank you Li!!

Li's picture

(post #63619, reply #26 of 26)

You're welcome!

Central Scrutinizer; Cooks Talk moderator

Only connect.

NanaC's picture

(post #63619, reply #19 of 26)

I read a great tip, can't remember where, for dividing a cake layer.  Wrap a length of sewing thread around the edges of the layer, making sure it's centered and overlaps slightly.  Pull on the thread and it will divide the layer into perfect halves.  I don't need this often, but it's never failed me when I did!

Fran


"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

Jean's picture

(post #63619, reply #20 of 26)

Works great with dental floss too, but make sure it's not the flavored kind. :)

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


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NanaC's picture

(post #63619, reply #22 of 26)

Dental floss?  Great idea... much more sanitary than my sewing thread!  LOL

Fran


"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

Fran

"Life may not be the party we hoped for, but while we're here we might as well dance!"

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63619, reply #23 of 26)

We use dental floss to cut cheesecakes also

deejeh's picture

(post #63619, reply #25 of 26)

It's also a great way to vertically slice a round of Brie, to make a smoked salmon torte.


deej

dlish's picture

(post #63619, reply #21 of 26)

I LOVE it! That is a great tip! I'm definitely going to use it next time.

RuthWells's picture

(post #63619, reply #7 of 26)

I'm always leery of leaving cream-based fillings at room temp for more than a day, 'specially in summer -- what is it that prevents the cream from turning, do you think?


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63619, reply #8 of 26)

The sugar. Ganache is good for several days at least room temperature.

RuthWells's picture

(post #63619, reply #10 of 26)

I didn't think that bittersweet chocolate would contain enough sugar to "preserve" the cream -- learn something new every day! Thanks!

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63619, reply #11 of 26)

The cocoa butter helps too, I'm sure. Honestly, it takes a long, long time for ganache to go bad at room temperature. The cake would spoil first.

RuthWells's picture

(post #63619, reply #12 of 26)

Excellent to know.  Hey, I made dipped truffles for the first time this weekend -- what a gas!!  They were not beautiful, by a loooooooooong shot, but they were tasty and fun to do.  Even Hubby (who does not care for desserts) liked them. 


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #63619, reply #13 of 26)

Careful, that's how I got started...

RuthWells's picture

(post #63619, reply #14 of 26)

LOL, that's what I was afraid of!!


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Biscuit's picture

(post #63619, reply #9 of 26)

Not only will it be okay, but it will probably taste better if you let it sit for a day.  I usually fill cakes a day or so ahead of time, and then frost.  The filling (especially a nut filling) will have lots of time to set up and deepen in flavor, and the cake will start to take on the flavor, giving the finished cake a "seamless" taste and texture.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw