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Cake decorating help please

Gary's picture

Cake decorating help please (post #65173)

in

I just found out that a friend, who is getting married in 2 weeks, is not planning to have a wedding cake because they cannot afford it. I think that is a real shame and would like to help out, but I have minimal experience in cake decorating (that's next semester). I know she likes this design. The caption said it is fondant covered and the ribbons are black licorice. Any ideas on how to reproduce the design pattern that looks like three dots? Other options to replace the black licorice yet still have that look? Thanks one and all.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

TracyK's picture

(post #65173, reply #1 of 34)

You can buy really good fondant (Satin Ice) pretty cheaply from www.fondantsource.com. I wouldn't mess with making it. Covering round cakes with fondant is actually fairly simple, you do want a thin coat of buttercream to give the fondant something to adhere to.


You could replace the licorice with hand-piped black royal icing, but it is usually tricky to get a nice deep black. You could also just use very thin black satin ribbon (obviously they'd remove and discard that before serving!).


The dots are piped with a small round tip... shouldn't be too hard to replicate as long as you measure it out so they're evenly spaced. :)


Good luck!


 



"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #2 of 34)

Thanks. I figured that's what was going on, but needed a more expert opinion. I've used satin ice before and it's pretty good.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

chiquiNO's picture

(post #65173, reply #23 of 34)

I think there is a tip with three dots (round holes).  Check out the Maid Of scandanavia website...I think it's called sweet celebrations now.  They have every tip known to man!!!

 

 

RuthWells's picture

(post #65173, reply #27 of 34)

Sweet Celebrations went out of business some months ago, unfortunately.

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com



www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabId=1182&ParticipantID=316&Type=1

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #20 of 34)

What if I piped a line of black royal icing on a strip of parchment paper, applied some piping gel with brush to the stripe, and then pressed it up against the side of the fondant and peeled off the paper? If I cut the paper to the right width, I could pipe two or three stripes and not only have them straight, but also spaced right. The bows could be piped separately and then once they've dried, glued to the stripe.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

TracyK's picture

(post #65173, reply #21 of 34)

I don't think that would work... I don't think the icing would transfer well from the parchment to the fondant. At best it would be an unevenly squashed line, and at worst it would look like an inkblot.


You could use black fondant, rolled into very thin snakes either with your hands or using a pasta extruder (and you can order pre-colored black fondant from fondantsource). Make the bows of fondant ahead of time and let them dry well, then attach them with a bit of fresh fondant or royal icing.


 


 



"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #22 of 34)

Great ideas, thanks.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

chiquiNO's picture

(post #65173, reply #24 of 34)

Does it need to be that many tiers???  I have used satin ribbon and it is shiney and perfect...doesn't run (colors) and can be easily removed before cutting.  You could make the dots with silver dragees...????  Whew!!  You CAN DO IT!!!!!

 

 

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #25 of 34)

Hi Chiqui,

Thanks for the tips. I'm probably going to pare it down to 3 layers (12", 9", 6"). According to RLD, that should feed 150. I hadn't thought about dragees. I bet I could find them in black.

BTW. You remember that pinwheel cake recipe I sent you? If it is filled with Bavarian cream, it is called a Charlotte Royal. Thought you'd like to know.
http://www.axis-of-aevil.net/img/2005_08/charlotteroyale-foranu.jpg

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

TracyK's picture

(post #65173, reply #26 of 34)

I sound like the voice of doom here, but ... dragees may not stick very well on fondant, and I think you'd have the devil of a time trying to affix them in an intricate pattern like that. Sticking tiny round things on a vertical, non-sticky surface would be much trickier than piping small dots. You'd probably have to use tweezers, and that would be a pain!


"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #28 of 34)

You're right, of course. Piping dots is the way to go. I bought some fondant this afternoon and will try out the pasta extruder on my KitchenAid mixer tomorrow.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

TracyK's picture

(post #65173, reply #29 of 34)

That sounds like fun... it's like the Play-Doh Fun Factory writ large and edible. :)


You're so kind to do this for them. :)



"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

evelyn's picture

(post #65173, reply #30 of 34)

that looks like a brain cake! I must have missed the recipe...could you give it again? I'm thinking I could make this (not as nice as in the picture) for Hallowe'en. :-)

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
chiquiNO's picture

(post #65173, reply #31 of 34)

FABULOUS PICTURE!!!!!!  Bet it tasted wonderful!!  I cut the recipe out of the magazine along with the picture that was actually the cover that year....but of course...I've lost it over the years.  Thanks for the picture...I saved it!!!!

 

 

chiquiNO's picture

(post #65173, reply #32 of 34)

UHHHH  Do you have a good Bavarian Cream recipe...since the recipe you sent me was filled with chocolate mousse....LOL

 

 

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #33 of 34)

This is scaled for Charlotte Russe. How much is needed for Charlotte Royal will depend on the diameter of your dome.

Vanilla Bavarian Cream
Yields: sufficient for two 10" and two 6" Charlotte Russe

Ingredients Amount

Gelatin 1 ½ oz
Cold Water 12 fl oz

Egg yolks 12 oz
Sugar 12 oz
Milk 1 ½ pt
Heavy cream 1 ½ pt
Vanilla bean (2)

Heavy cream 1 ½ Qt

Method:

1. In a small container, bloom the gelatin.
2. In a double boiler, whisk all of the ingredients in the second stage. Heat to 185°F. This is a vanilla sauce.
3. Remove from heat, whisk in the bloomed gelatin. Note that because the sauce is already hot, you do not have to heat up the gelatin mixture.
4. Make sure all of the molds and cake layers are ready before proceeding.
5. Whip the heavy cream to soft peaks.
6. Cool the sauce in an ice bath with constant stirring to 72° F.
7. Add the whipped cream all at once and immediately fold into the sauce.
8. Use immediately.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

chiquiNO's picture

(post #65173, reply #34 of 34)

THANKS!!!!!!!!

 

 

RuthWells's picture

(post #65173, reply #3 of 34)

That's a stunning cake, and I won't add to the great advice you've already gotten -- other than to say, a cake that simple and elegant is REALLY hard to pull off well. When the decor is so spare, there is nowhere to hide, so to speak. I'm not trying to be negative, just a bit realistic about how challenging that design is .... best of luck!

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #5 of 34)

"a cake that simple and elegant is REALLY hard to pull off well. "

Well, let's check my qualifications:

cake decorating experience - nope
steady hand - nope
artistic eye - nope

Perfect score. I've got it nailed!

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Canuck's picture

(post #65173, reply #6 of 34)

enthusiasm, check


immediate access to online experts, check


some ER stitching experience, which must have had to be somewhat symmetrical, check


You'll be fine!

madnoodle's picture

(post #65173, reply #7 of 34)

You took the words right out of my mouth!  Enthusiasm and confidence go a long way in most pursuits, I've found.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Canuck's picture

(post #65173, reply #8 of 34)

Well, yes, because we think exactly the same way!

Gary's picture

(post #65173, reply #10 of 34)

Your comment about stitching got me thinking. I can do running stitches, running locked stitches, horizontal mattress stitches, vertical mattress stitches, interrupted stitches, and the purse string stitch, which I've had to use several times to sew up bullet holes in beating hearts in the ER. Decorating a cake should be a lot easier I hope.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

TracyK's picture

(post #65173, reply #11 of 34)

You'll be just fine. The first time I ever covered a cake in fondant I was surprised at how simple it was, and how perfect it looked even though I didn't feel like I was doing it "right," exactly. It's very like wrapping gifts and playing with play-doh. I imagine a surgeon is pretty good with his hands. You'll be fine.


"Attend to the details. Teach your children manners. Write cogent paragraphs. Drive carefully. And make a good potato salad, one with some crunch, maybe accompanied by a fried drumstick with crackly skin -- the humble potato and the stupid chicken, ennobled by diligent cooking -- and is this not the meaning of our beautiful country, to take what is common and enable it to become beautiful?"

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Canuck's picture

(post #65173, reply #12 of 34)

TMI!!! LOL


Yikes, I wondered how you'd use a purse stitch, and now I know. I hope Sally doesn't see this.


Have you met a lot of brides? Some of them are as frantic about results as the bullet victim probably was. No pressure :)


Edited 7/29/2009 11:50 am ET by Canuck

dorcast's picture

(post #65173, reply #13 of 34)

I have no advice, but think you are making a lovely gesture.
I'm sure ####hand steady enough to stitch up gaping wounds, will do a fabulous job on a cake.

madnoodle's picture

(post #65173, reply #14 of 34)

I've never done either, but I'm thinking that covering a cake in fondant and doing a bit of piping just MIGHT be easier than sewing up a bullet hole in a beating heart.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?


 

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

leonap's picture

(post #65173, reply #17 of 34)

Just wanted to echo everyone else. This is a wonderful thing to do for your friend. And if you can stitch up a heart, this should be a piece of cake! (I know. Groan.) I am not a cake decorator so I may have dreamed this up -- seems like I've heard of cake decorating pens. If there is such a thing, I think it would make making the dots easier. BTW, that is such an elegant cake.

RuthWells's picture

(post #65173, reply #16 of 34)

LOL, you'll be fine!

Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com



www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabId=1182&ParticipantID=316&Type=1

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

evelyn's picture

(post #65173, reply #18 of 34)

LOL - you're funny! I can't wait to see the pictures.

Children are unpredictable. You never know what inconsistency they're going to catch you in next.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.