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Bread of the weekend...

SallyBR1's picture

This weekend's bread is panettone, following the BBA challenge. his recipe is quite involved, using a sourdough starter to make a wild sponge. The sponge sits for 4 hours at room temperature, then goes to the fridge overnight.

four other people already made this recipe and we have mixed results - two loved it, two absolutely hate it.

we shall see.....

I am taking it to the lab tomorrow no matter what, everybody loves panettone in our group, and I definitely don't need to have the bread hanging around the house.

if anyone here has made this recipe, I am all ears

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Maedl's picture

(post #65237, reply #1 of 27)

I haven't made the recipe, but panettone isn't usually made with a sour dough starter, is it? I know where you can get a seriously delectable panettone in Bologna, should you ever be passing through!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #2 of 27)

Normally it uses only commercial yeast, but it turns out that the original recipe is supposed to take a wild yeast sponge. Peter Reinhart says that one bakery in Italy switched to the original recipe for some of their panettone, and no one wanted the other kind anymore, because this is much much better

I have high hopes for this recipe....

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Jean's picture

(post #65237, reply #3 of 27)

I've made the American Style Panettone recipe from KA Flour and really liked the way it turned out. You can read about it on their blog too.


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/PrintRecipe?RID=172&radio=1



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SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #4 of 27)

I don't remember if I made that or another one from their blog - I think it was the other, they did not call it panettone, but it took fiori di Sicilia in the dough, which is characteristic of it.

the dough smells great, it's almost done rising, I will prepare the pan, shape it, and wait for another two hours to bake it

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Maedl's picture

(post #65237, reply #5 of 27)

Well, it sounds really interesting. If it's good, will you share the recipe? I love panettone, and it's that time of year!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #26 of 27)

Here we go.... since you told me you were not in a hurry, I decided to just post here for everybody

Barm (makes 6 cups)

16 ounces bread flour
16 ounces water at room temp
7 ounces seed sourdough starter (store bought or made from scratch)

stir flour, water and seed culture in a mixing bowl. Cover the container and let it ferment for at least 6 hours. Open the lid to release the gas, put the lid back and refrigerate overnight before using. The barm can be used next day, but will also stay potent for 3 days. If needed, refresh it again before use.

Panettone

Wild yeast sponge
7 ounces active barm
8 ounces milk,lukewarm
4.5 ounces all purpose flour

Fruit blend
6 ounces golden raisins
6 ounces candied fruits
4 ounces brandy or rum
1 T orange extract
1 T vanilla extract (or fiore di sicilia)

DOUGH
13.5 ounces all purpose flour
3 T granulated sugar
3/4 tsp salt
1 T instant yeast
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
4-6 T lukewarm water
4 ounces unsalted butter at room temp
5 ounces blanched almonds (I omitted)

Day before
Make the wild yeast sponge: mix barm, milk and flour - cover. Ferment 4 hours, then refrigerate overnight
Soak the fruits and raisins in the liquor and extracts. Leave overnight at room temp

Following day
Remove sponge from fridge 1 hour before starting to make the dough. Drain the fruits.

Make the dough - stir flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in the bowl of a mixer. Add the sponge, egg and egg yolk. Stir until it forms a ball. Add as much of the water as needed to fom a dough. Stop mixing and let the dough rest for 20 minutes. Add the softened butter and the soaked fruit mixture, continue mixing until everything is incorporated.

Mix the dough with a dough hook for 2-4 minutes, then start adding the almonds as you continue to mix/knead. The entire process should last 6-10 minutes. Cover the bowl and allow it to ferment for 2 hours. It should rise about 1.5 times the original size.

Divide the dough into 2 pans, forming two "boules" - Press the dough slightly to spread it in the pans (6 inches in diameter). Proof at room temperature for 2 hours.

Place in 325 F oven and bake for 1.5 hours, or until internal temp is 185F.

transfer to cooling rack (remove from pans) and wait 2 hours before slicing.

ENJOY!!!!

(if you have any doubts, drop me an email, the recipe is very long, I just summarized here)

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Maedl's picture

(post #65237, reply #27 of 27)

Thanks, Sally! I was in Munich yesterday and bought candied orange and citron at Viktualienmarkt--they come in huge chunks and I know they are really good and will be perfect for the panettone. I also talked with the baker at my favorite bakery shop and he'll help me with the starter. So I'm in good shape and will make it in the next few weeks!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #65237, reply #6 of 27)

As long as you remember that it's just a damn fruitcake.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #7 of 27)

Well, fruitcake or not :-) this is awesome!

moist, tender, fruity, amazing crumb - I am really happy with this recipe

will post it a little later

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #8 of 27)

Just to give you a teaser....

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

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MadMom's picture

(post #65237, reply #9 of 27)

Looks gorgeous.  My only experience with pannetone is when the housemother at our sorority house made some for the girls who were late going home for Christmas.  One of the girls didn't even taste it, but immediately put peanut butter on hers.  I thought the housemother was going to faint!



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SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #10 of 27)

I read too fast and instead of faint, read "fart".

Well, peanut butter could do that, I guess. :-)

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

tones's picture

(post #65237, reply #11 of 27)

OMG!  Sally, I want some.  My downfall is bread and that is not just bread...it's from heaven!  Beautiful.

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #12 of 27)

My loaf is a little shallow, but I did not have the correct pan size - 6 inches.

mine was bigger. But it turned out ok.

it just proves that sometimes size matter, and bigger is not necessarily better. Heck, I am in the corner already, might as well do it justice

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

tones's picture

(post #65237, reply #13 of 27)

Are you sure the correct pan size was 6"?  There isn't a corner big enough if size matters.   LOL!!!!

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #14 of 27)

Yeah, I doubled checked. We can ask Peter Reinhart, just to make sure...

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Maedl's picture

(post #65237, reply #19 of 27)

Sally, that looks heavenly. I wouldn't be surprised if the recipe did specify a 6-inch pan. The recipes I've seen say to bake it in a coffee can. I'm glad to see you used a regular pan and it worked, because I can't get a US-sized coffee can here.

I have put candied citron and orange on my shopping list. I'm going up to Munich and the Viktualienmarkt on Saturday. They see beautiful candied fruit!

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #25 of 27)

I got feedback from an Italian woman, who said that the original recipe for panettone was more or less like mine (believe it or not.. :-) - only much later they changed the format to the "coffee can" style.

this recipe is supposed to be very close to the original, from hundreds of years ago

what do I know? It tasted great, the students swallowed every crumb next day

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

tones's picture

(post #65237, reply #21 of 27)

I'm not going to touch that line that with a 6 or 9 inch pole.

chiquiNO's picture

(post #65237, reply #22 of 27)

But where is the recipe????? LOL

 

 

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #23 of 27)

The folks doing the BBA Challenge (that is, cooking the whole book) agreed not to post any of the recipes, because it would be unfair to Peter, to have every single recipe of his book available in each of those blogs. So, we don't

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

cyalexa's picture

(post #65237, reply #16 of 27)

Warning - sexist, anatomically explicit naughty story in reply to Sally's 


it just proves that sometimes size matter


When I was an equine practitioner (horse doctor) and would get a phone call about a horse with a laceration (cut), if the caller was a woman I would assume she was correct about the length of the laceration. If the caller was a man I would assume he was overestimating the length by about 50% because most men think that this:


I----------------------------------------------------------I


is 9 inches.


Edited 10/26/2009 9:31 am ET by cyalexa

TracyK's picture

(post #65237, reply #17 of 27)

Heeeeeeee. :)


We are all in the same boat, you and me and ex-Gov. Palin and Rep. Joe Wilson, and wealth and social status do not prevail against disease and injury. And now we must reform our health insurance system so that it reflects our common humanity. It is not decent that people avoid seeking help for want of insurance. It is not decent that people go broke trying to get well. You know it and I know it. Time to fix it.

                                                            -- Garrison Keillor

Syrah's picture

(post #65237, reply #15 of 27)

Yum. That looks fabulous.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

chiquiNO's picture

(post #65237, reply #18 of 27)

Gorgeous!!!!  I buy a few of the Italian ones every year at a local grocery...but the prices have gone up so much!!!  I love it in the morning with a little butter and a hot cup or two of coffee!!  Heaven


Can't wait for the recipe!!


Edited 10/26/2009 3:53 pm by chiquiNO

 

bjb0777's picture

(post #65237, reply #20 of 27)

I am afraid that this beautiful bread is beyond my capabilities..but I want all of you to try Sally's Brazilian cheese bread.. cannot remember the real name...but!!..it is fabulous.. inhaled by family and friend before I could even put it on the table! Check it out on Sally's blog!! Thanks Sally... Barb Want to add..no fainting or farting!!


Edited 10/26/2009 8:55 pm ET by bjb0777

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65237, reply #24 of 27)

Glad you enjoyed those!

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com