NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

bread pudding

MadMom's picture

bread pudding (post #65240)

in

Believe it or not, this is one CT recipe I like.  I think it came from the "Best of" book, and I use it for all my bread puddings.  The secret is to cube all the bread and to take out maybe a third or fourth of it before you mix the rest with the eggs, etc.  The dried bread cubes are then sprinkled on top and covered with butter, cinnamon, and sugar.  Sounds counter-intuitive, but it seems to make it lighter.


Before I found that one, I used one from a New Orleans native which added fruit cocktail and some sort of liquor (rum?) and called for soaking the bread in beaten egg yolks, then folding in well-beaten egg whites.  That one came out really nice and fluffy. 


ETA that I meant bread cubes, not crumbs.




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!


Edited 10/29/2009 9:44 am ET by MadMom

MadMom's picture

(post #65240, reply #1 of 24)

Do let me know which method you like best.  I like both, but then I am a bread pudding freak.  Haven't made any in ages, because I'm apt to eat the whole thing!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

knitpik's picture

(post #65240, reply #2 of 24)

You can also fold some stiff egg whites to your custard. That's what
my Mam does. I think I need to make me some bread pudding. :)

Gary's picture

(post #65240, reply #3 of 24)

A lot of the quality of the final product depends on the quality of the ingredients. No surprise there. I use brioche cut into 1" cubes. These are oven dried at low temperature until the outside is slightly crunchy, but the inside is still somewhat moist. If you dry them too much, the custard won't soak in. The cubes are soaked in the custard with a weight on top (I put the bread cubes and custard into a hotel pan and then nest a second hotel pan on top and wight it down with a couple of large juice cans) overnight in the refrigerator and then baked off the second day.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

The people who gave us golf and called it a game are the same people who gave us bag pipes and called it music and haggis and called it food.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65240, reply #4 of 24)

While this is billed as French toast, it is very much bread pudding and absolutely delicious.


I would not weight it as Gary suggests for his bread pudding if a fluffier result is what you seem to be wanting. This puffs up nicely.  That technique is obviously correct (Gary being a real expert), and something I've never done--and is also obviously why bread puddings are the dense layers as served in restos.


This can, of course be tweaked. I use brioche instead of baguette, and in fact, never use "real" baguette, but do use the fluffy supermarket bakery Italian loaf when I can't get brioche--or challah.


Baked Blueberry-Pecan French Toast With Blueberry Syrup

Ingredients:
6 Servings
-------------------
1 baguette - (24" long)
6 large eggs
3 cups whole milk
1/2 Tsp freshly-grated nutmeg
1 Tsp vanilla
1 cup brown sugar - (packed)
1 cup pecans - (abt 3 oz)
1/2 stick unsalted butter - (1/4 cup), plus
1 Tsp butter, Unsalted
1/4 Tsp salt
3 cups blueberries, (1 cup of which
will make the syrup)
1/2 cup pure maple syrup
1 Tbl fresh lemon juice


Method of Preparation:
Butter a 13- by 9-inch baking dish. Cut 20 (1-inch) slices from baguette and arrange in 1 layer in the baking dish. In a large bowl whisk together eggs, milk, nutmeg, vanilla and 3/4 cup brown sugar and pour evenly over bread. Chill mixture, covered, until all liquid is absorbed by bread, at least 8 hours, and up to 1 day. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a shallow baking pan, spread pecans evenly and toast in middle of oven until fragrant, about 8 minutes. Toss pecans in pan with 1 teaspoon butter and salt. Increase temperature to 400 degrees. Sprinkle pecans and blueberries evenly over bread mixture. Cut 1/2 stick butter into pieces and in a small saucepan heat with remaining 1/4 cup brown sugar, stirring until butter is melted. Drizzle butter mixture over bread and bake for 20 minutes, or until any liquid from the blueberries is bubbling. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, cook blueberries and maple syrup over moderate heat until berries have burst, about 3 minutes. Pour syrup through a sieve into a heatproof pitcher, pressing on solids, and stir in lemon juice. Syrup may be made 1 day ahead and chilled, covered. Reheat syrup before serving. Serve French toast with syrup. This recipe yields 6 generous servings. Source: "COOKING LIVE with Sara Moulton - (Show # CL-9558) - from the TV FOOD NETWORK" S(Formatted for MC5): "08-27-2000 by Joe Comiskey - "


Gretchen
Gretchen
nexus's picture

(post #65240, reply #5 of 24)

Last weekend I made a bread pudding using croissant. It got rave reviews. Simple easy recipe, threw in an apple to use it up.


Cheryl

Gretchen's picture

(post #65240, reply #6 of 24)

Now you can move on to the one made with Krispy Kremes--and don't knock it if you ain't tried it!!  DDIL made it (there's a resto here that does it too), and it was a quota for a sugar rush for sure!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
nexus's picture

(post #65240, reply #8 of 24)

I don't knock it bit I don't even LIKE Krispy Kremes so its just not gonna happen. Not meaning to be insulting.


Cheryl

Gretchen's picture

(post #65240, reply #10 of 24)

Sorry, should have put a smiley. Everyone ALWAYS says ewwwwww!  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Gretchen's picture

(post #65240, reply #7 of 24)

Buns would be the WORST, unless you just have to use them up.

Gretchen

Gretchen
MadMom's picture

(post #65240, reply #11 of 24)

Believe it or not, I went to a class once where the chef prepared bread pudding with old hamburger buns, and it was actually good.  I, too, would have neve thought to use them, but this was quite tasty.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

nexus's picture

(post #65240, reply #12 of 24)

Its just a dish that's really hard to screw up I guess.


Cheryl

MadMom's picture

(post #65240, reply #13 of 24)

Meant to add that at the same class, she made bread pudding with donuts.  I think you're right, no matter how it's made, it's delicious!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

nexus's picture

(post #65240, reply #18 of 24)

I'm sure somebody somewhere can screw it up but I never have.


Cheryl

Lee's picture

(post #65240, reply #16 of 24)

A chef gave me his recipe for bread pudding, which was the signature dessert at his restaurant.  It's made with hot dog buns, and it's darn good.

Lee's picture

(post #65240, reply #17 of 24)

I like most bread puddings, as long as they aren't dense and heavy, but the two absolute standouts that I've ever had are the signature bread pudding souffle that was created by Chef Jamie Shannon when he was at Commander's Palace in NOLA, and the incredibly light, and incredibly rich, bread and butter pudding that was served at the legendary Coach House restaurant in NYC.  I haven't made either one in quite awhile, but they used to elicit raves from dinner guests.


Here's the recipe for the Coach House version (it's also in The New York Times Cookbook, if any of you still have that book):


http://www.sptimes.com/2005/03/30/Taste/Bread_pudding_recipes.shtml


Here's the one from Commander's:


 http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Bread-Pudding-Souffle-with-Whiskey-Sauce-104643


  

nexus's picture

(post #65240, reply #9 of 24)

Stale French bread is perfect for bread pudding; after all bread pudding is just basically french toast in a bowl. Bread, custard, whatever else you want to throw in, that's it. I jus happened to have some old croissant lying around begging to be used.


Cheryl


 


l

Gretchen's picture

(post #65240, reply #14 of 24)

As I said in another post, I find "real" crunchy baguette just too crusty for our taste. Of course, any of it is good. I just prefer other softer breads like challah, brioche, or the puffy bakery French/Italian bread. Toasting it helps too.


Stale baguette (that is one that is 3 hours old, I think), is REALLY hard!!


Gretchen


Edited 11/3/2009 9:52 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
roz's picture

(post #65240, reply #15 of 24)

<<<i'm going to try some of the lighter loaves>>>

Try challah or panetone....also makes great French toast.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
nexus's picture

(post #65240, reply #19 of 24)

Are you're talking about fluffing or softening? If you just want it softer use more milk and soak it a while until the crust softens. I don't understand the fluffy? I've made it with 100% whole wheat bread and it was delicious.


Cheryl

Jonagold's picture

(post #65240, reply #20 of 24)

I like to use day-old raisen bread but I don't use as much sugar as the recipe calls for.  Of course, we love raisens. Do you place  the bread pudding dish in a pan of water while baking?

nexus's picture

(post #65240, reply #22 of 24)

Should I confess? I riff on the recipe in Barbara Harris's "Lets Cook Microwave" I've had it for years and years and use it as a reference along with the Barbara Kafka books.


I just use whatever I have on hand, use the proportions and Mad Mom it.


Cheryl

thecooktoo's picture

(post #65240, reply #23 of 24)

I didn't get in on the start of this conversation, but I don't see how you can screw up bread pudding.  I have never found any that I did not just dearly love.  Some more than others, sure.  But never have found a bad one.  Did get one out of the back of the fridge one time and did not notice the mold until I took the first bite.  That is one that I did not care for.  So I just cut the top off and ate the rest of it anyway.  Still here!


The best ones I have ever made were made with challah or brioche and then the one I made with the trimmings from big white sheet cakes with no frosting on them...marvelous.


Jim

MadMom's picture

(post #65240, reply #24 of 24)

After the chef demonstrated making bread puddings with stale hamburger buns and with donuts, I experimented.  It was actually pretty good made with leftover chocolate birthday cake.  I tried to scrape off as much icing as possible, but it was still a bit sweet for my taste.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #65240, reply #21 of 24)

"Fluffy" will be (or might be what you are talking about) if you don't weight it as was sggested in one post for bread pudding. Mine sort of puffs up and gets little hills of crustiness on the bread pieces. Didn't adjust any amounts.

Gretchen

Gretchen