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bread not baked through

evelyn's picture

bread not baked through (post #65208)

in

I thought it would be fun to show the kids how to make bread tonight. Didn't follow a recipe, but showed them how to 'feed' the yeast and proof it; add it to flour with salt, a little olive oil and some water. Taught them the fundamentals of kneading and rising (2 risings) and bake the product. We got a lovely-looking loaf. I had it in a 400F oven for 35 minutes. It was a beautiful golden colour and sounded hollow when I tapped the bottom of the loaf. I removed it and we let it cool for about 40 minutes before cutting some hot bread to have with butter. It really could have used another 6-7 minutes of baking. Can I salvage it in any way now?

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65208, reply #1 of 26)

How big was the loaf, Evelyn?

I find that for loaves larger than a baguette, it is important to check the temperature with a thermometer. It is very easy to underbake bread when it's large. That hollow sound, in my humble opinion, is not a good indication.

Some breads will only have a dry, properly cooked crumb when they reach 205-210F, which seems quite high, but it's not.

Since your bread was not a sourdough, I would say that 190-195F would be ok, but you need to make sure the center of the bread reached that temp, and without an instant read thermometer, it's not that easy

If the bread is browning too much, I cover with foil, but the more I bake, the less afraid I am of overbrowning.

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

evelyn's picture

(post #65208, reply #8 of 26)

It was a very large loaf - this was really more of an 'experiment' for the kids - but there's no reason not to eat it (wrong flour used thought - I only had AP). Since the experiment went so well, I'm going to make sure to pick up some hard flour (and some seeds, I think) for next weekend, and we'll make a proper seeded loaf.

Yes, you're right, the loaf was just too large. Still enjoyed a great deal of it with butter after I posted, though. :-)

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Canuck's picture

(post #65208, reply #2 of 26)

Not that this has ever happened to me (wry grin) but I know for a fact that slicing and toasting it helps.

leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #3 of 26)

Genius! Speaking of bread, I found this today at Tastespotting and my mouth is watering looking at the picture. You roll the shaped loves in a mixture of kosher salt and poppy seeds, then brush with an olive oil, garlic, basil and oregano mixture. Surely you'd use dried herbs in this, wouldn't you?

http://web.mac.com/jasonforest/thecupcakeforest.com/Blog/Entries/2009/9/26_Entry_1.html

Canuck's picture

(post #65208, reply #4 of 26)

I'm not a great bread baker (see above) so perhaps not the person to ask. I think it sounds fantastic though.

leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #6 of 26)

Thanks anyway.

MadMom's picture

(post #65208, reply #5 of 26)

Looks like dried herbs to me.  Looks delicious.



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leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #7 of 26)

Thanks. It does look delicious, doesn't it? I'll report back if/when I make it.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65208, reply #13 of 26)

No, I wouldn't necessarily use herbs at all. The salt and seeds look good enough.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #19 of 26)

Yes, that would be good, but I'm going the whole nine yards. lol.

leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #20 of 26)

Rut-roh. I'm cutting it close with the bread flour. If I need to sub some AP flour, do I need to make any adjustments either in amounts or adding/subtracting ingredients? TIA.

Jean's picture

(post #65208, reply #21 of 26)

I never do. shrug.


"The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled,
public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance."
                                               - Cicero  - 55 BC
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #22 of 26)

Thanks, Jean. I just did a quick search and per what I read, if anything the bread wouldn't be as sturdy. I don't think I'll need much if at all, so I'm going for it. That is, if I have everything else!

leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #23 of 26)

So I made the Kruse and Muer House Bread. Before I forget, I checked the temperature when I took it out of the oven and it registered 210 degrees. These were small baguette-sized loaves, using all bread flour, and baked perfectly per the directions. Success so far. Then we ate it. TOOOOO salty from being rolled in the salt/poppy seed mixture. And I even cut the salt in half. Would have been delicious if not for this. I should have known better. Grrr.

Anyway, this reminded me of a fougassi (sp?) from Epi that uses lots of Herbes de Provence in that it is a quick yeast bread relying on seeds and herbs for a big flavor boost and I suspect best eaten the day it's baked. I will probably make it again but roll it in only poppy seeds, brush with the olive oil mixture and lightly sprinkle kosher or sea salt on the top only. One more thing, I halved the olive oil mixture and there was plenty left for dipping. That is one of my pet peeves when a recipe says to make up way more dressing or whatever needed. Good olive oil is too expensive and precious to risk it going to waste.

http://web.mac.com/jasonforest/thecupcakeforest.com/Blog/Entries/2009/9/26_Entry_1.html


Edited 10/4/2009 8:56 pm ET by leonap

leonap's picture

(post #65208, reply #24 of 26)

One last thing if anyone is interested: this bread is very good two days later. I did scrape off as much salt as I could. I will be making this again.

evelyn's picture

(post #65208, reply #9 of 26)

mmmm...going to start slicing for breakfast. Toast with tea it is! And I picked up these lovely orange and blueberry jams last week....

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Maedl's picture

(post #65208, reply #10 of 26)

Back in the late 1980s Marvelous Market introduced decent breads to Washington, DC. Their bread was absolutely outstanding--crisp, crackly crusts and chewy interiors. The baker used to bake the loaves until they were really, really dark. Customers said the loaves were burned but the baker insisted that that's the way bread should be baked--and as far as I'm concerned, he was right.

Those halcyon days of MM are long gone. They sold out and now produce insipid, but excessively expensive breads. A shame, but a big encouragement to bake my own bread.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
evelyn's picture

(post #65208, reply #11 of 26)

at the bakery I buy my bread from, the ladies always tried to reach for one of the paler loaves with a softer crust to give me, in order to please me. They know now that I prefer what they consider the 'burnt'
loaves. But I hadn't baked my own bread in a few years and the inexperience showed. ;-)

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
Maedl's picture

(post #65208, reply #12 of 26)

My grandmother always used to say that if you don't cook frequently, you lose your skills, and I know she was right. You forget and then have to re-learn.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65208, reply #14 of 26)

That is so true!

Yesterday while making multigrain bread from BBA, once more I decided to fold the dough instead of knead it.

when I formed the loaf and allowed it to rise, it had a particular "feel" - I thought that I should not slash it, that it would behave better baked straight as it was. But, for some reason I did not listen to my inner voice, and made three slashes on top

sure enough, the bread opened too much sideways and that prevented it from rising UP.

only after baking bread weekly for what - 1 year and a half maybe? - I am starting very very slowly to "read the dough"

of course, it is not enough to read it, as I learned yesterday, you gotta pay attention to the text!

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

SallyBR1's picture

(post #65208, reply #15 of 26)

ok, a couple of photos from yesterday's bread.

Multigrain Bread Extraordinaire, bread number 20 of the challenge. Twenty down twenty-three to go....

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

PreviewAttachmentSize
bread1.jpg
bread1.jpg77.9 KB
slices1.jpg
slices1.jpg93.03 KB
Jean's picture

(post #65208, reply #16 of 26)

YUM. I wouldn't exactly call that a failure.


"The budget should be balanced, the Treasury should be refilled,
public debt should be reduced, the arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands should be curtailed lest Rome become bankrupt. People must again learn to work, instead of living on public assistance."
                                               - Cicero  - 55 BC
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
SallyBR1's picture

(post #65208, reply #17 of 26)

Let's say that I picked a very special angle to take the picture.... he, he, he....

 


 


American Citizen, with a tropical twist...


(May 29th, 2009)

 


 


http://bewitchingkitchen.wordpress.com

Maedl's picture

(post #65208, reply #18 of 26)

I'd give yourself lots of credit for reading the dough correctly. Now your confidence should be high enough to trust what you've read! :-)

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
knitpik's picture

(post #65208, reply #25 of 26)

I don't know how big your loaf was but I usually bake mine at 400 for
30 mins and it's done. Try to put the loaf on a lower shelf next time.

evelyn's picture

(post #65208, reply #26 of 26)

It was a pretty big loaf, and it was on the lowest shelf. It just needed a few minutes longer, as I said. All eaten now. We toasted it and enjoyed it with butter. :-)

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.