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Big, FLAT cookies

helena1's picture

Big, FLAT cookies (post #64395)

in

Is what I ended up with when I made the chocolate chip-fudge filled cookies from the Elinor Klivans book. Ik was so disappointed! The cookies were on the front cover of the book and looked like a cakey, thick cookie with a ganache filling. What's not to like? But when I was baking them (the batter was so delicious by the way) they spread into humongous puddles, to end up as pancake thick cookies, big as a saucer. The ganache couldn't even save them.


I'm thinking it is the difference in sour cream that we have here versus the US kind. Ours is just a lot thinner. Bummer! 


courgette's picture

(post #64395, reply #1 of 104)

Maybe they need to be refrigerated before baking. That helps a lot with spreading.


Mo

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #3 of 104)

Well, the recipe didn't specify that, but I tried after the first disastrous sheet of cookies, and it didn't help squat :o(.

Canuck's picture

(post #64395, reply #2 of 104)

If it's thinner, could you put it in a coffee filter over a sieve for a while to thicken it up? Otherwise, I agree with Mo that refrigerating may help. When I chill the dough first I always reduce the temp. (Sorry, I know you're a fantastic baker and are probably doing that; just general info.)

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #4 of 104)

Please, I'm glad you're giving suggestions! I've learned so much around here, I wouldn't have posted if I didn't want advice :o). I never thought about sieving the sour cream to thicken it, might have to try that some time. So you lower your oven temp after chilling the dough? Never did that before. How much would you turn it down?


CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64395, reply #5 of 104)

straining out some liquid is a great idea.
You could also try substituting quark for the sour cream.

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #8 of 104)

Hmmm, never thought about that, but then I'd think quark is even more water-y? Just seems like that (she sais without ever trying that..)

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64395, reply #25 of 104)

It depends on what kind. It's been a few years, but if I remember correctly the magerquark is rather thin, but the full fat version is much thicker.

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #28 of 104)

That is most definately true. I love quark in non-baked cakes, but usually stick to the lower fat versions because most of the non-bake recipes call for gelatin which makes it possible to use the runnier quark. Do you get any quark at all in Canada/US?

deejeh's picture

(post #64395, reply #6 of 104)

Just following up on Canuck's straining suggestion - we do it with full-fat Balkan-style yogurt, which is a little thick to begin with.  Strain it in a coffee-filter overnight in the fridge, and it has an absolutely sour cream texture.  It's not much tangier than sour cream, either.


deej

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #9 of 104)

Okay, you ladies have me convinced I should try it again because it just might work :o)


Canuck's picture

(post #64395, reply #31 of 104)

I reduce the temperature by 25 degrees F. Since I started making big choc chip cookies, I always bake them at 325 or 300 even so they stay thick. This also works to keep them thick if the dough is room temp (I did that last night).


Edited 7/29/2007 10:04 am ET by Canuck

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #35 of 104)

That sounds like great advice. I will definately try that next time. One thing about this book is that the cookies are all huge. I'm not used to it. I always make 'normal' sized cookies (always err on the small side even). I can see how lowering the temp would help though. Thanks so much!

Biscuit's picture

(post #64395, reply #7 of 104)

Hmmm - that shouldn't do it.


Post the recipe, let me try them.  They sound delicious.


FWIW - generally speaking [emphasis added] the first culprit in a "spread-too-much" cookie is sugar - too much, not the right kind, etc.


I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #10 of 104)

Will definately do that tomorrow, thanks!

KarenP's picture

(post #64395, reply #11 of 104)

  Would drained yogurt work in a recipe like this as a replacement for sour cream?  It works in breads, but I have no idea about cookies.

RuthWells's picture

(post #64395, reply #21 of 104)

"FWIW - generally speaking [emphasis added] the first culprit in a "spread-too-much" cookie is sugar - too much, not the right kind, etc."


Ooh, I'm eager to hear more about this -- I always assumed it was due to high butter content.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


www.cookiesforacure.blogspot.com

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Biscuit's picture

(post #64395, reply #24 of 104)

Not always.  Let me dig out my notes from baking school.  We had this entire section on just ingredients and how they affect baking.  I'll post it for you.

I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #27 of 104)

In this case the recipe does have quite a bit of sugar, so you think that might be what caused the disaster?

Biscuit's picture

(post #64395, reply #33 of 104)

Well, the theory is, the more granulated sugar, the larger the spread.  i.e., snicerdoodles vs. say, mexican wedding cakes.  Snickerdoodles have spread - mexican wedding cakes stay nice and tight.  Snickerdoodles use a large amount of granulated sugar - mexican wedding cakes don't, and what little they use, they use powdered sugar.


I remember doing an experiment in baking school once - a plain sugar cookie recipe.  In one batch we used all white granulated sugar.  In another, all light brown.  Another, all honey.  Another 10X only.  Another used an even finer grade of powdered sugar (20 X or something - bakeries use it for icing).  Anyway - same recipe, simply different sugars.  The difference in spread was astounding.  The honey cookies were a mess.  But the finer the grind of sugar, the less spread there was.


As I said - I have notes here somewhere.  I'm going to dig them out later.


In the meantime, I'm going to try these cookies today.  It may not be you or your ingredients - it might be the recipe.


I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #36 of 104)

Wow, I never knew that it would have such an impact on the outcome. And it does fit with this recipe in particular, that called for nothing but brown sugar (and quite a lot of it).


Thank you for your research and your testing, I surely appreciate it. The cookie is quite appealing to me, I'd love to be able to make it 'right'.


I'll try to experiment sometimes with the sugars as you noted, very interesting indeed.


DeannaS's picture

(post #64395, reply #38 of 104)

Did you measure the sugars by weight, or volume? 1 cup of powdered sugar weighs a lot less than 1 cup of brown sugar. Just curious, cause I might like to try it sometime to see what the results are.

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

Biscuit's picture

(post #64395, reply #40 of 104)

Weight.  In baking school, we weren't allowed to use measuring cups! (G)  EVER.  For any reason. 


I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

DeannaS's picture

(post #64395, reply #41 of 104)

That's what I figured - so you were using equal weights then, of each type of sugar?

"As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists." - Joan Dye Gussow

RuthWells's picture

(post #64395, reply #32 of 104)

If it's not too much trouble, I would love to have that as reference material.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


www.cookiesforacure.blogspot.com

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

knitpik's picture

(post #64395, reply #12 of 104)

You know, I'm pretty sure that's the first and last cookie I tried from this book. I got discouraged after my first attempt. Either we both did something wrong or it's the recipe. They look so good on the book cover.

helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #13 of 104)

Well, if nothing else I'm glad  to know I'm not the only one having problems. If you want to try one more recipe, make the chocolate chunck mountains, they are fabulous.

schnitzel's picture

(post #64395, reply #14 of 104)

Jean's picture

(post #64395, reply #15 of 104)

Looks like that's it according to my book. Good hunting.  We should all try them and see what we come up with. I'l have to shop first.



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
helena1's picture

(post #64395, reply #17 of 104)

They look a heck of a lot different from mine in that blog :o(

Jean's picture

(post #64395, reply #18 of 104)

BTW I love the big rose bundt cake! Beautiful.



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need