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Banana Bread disaster

AmyElliesMom's picture

I'm so irked. I never, ever have problems making banana bread, but with my nifty new KA, I decided to try a new recipe.

I used this recipe:

2 cups AP flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup butter

1/4 cup shortening

1/4 cup white sugar

1/4 cup brown sugar (light brown)

2 eggs

2 cups mashed banana (I wound up using 6 small mashed bananas for slightly over 2 cups)

Creamed the butter/shortening and sugars together, per the instructions in the KA cookbook for banana bread. Added the dry ingredients and bananas (half of each, mix, remainder, mix).

Poured it all into a 9x5 loaf pan. (This may be the source of my problem - i used a blue glass Pyrex loaf pan, which I've not done before.)

Baked at 350F for an hour. Outside was very, very, very brown. Loaf was high and top nicely cracked open. Inside was raw. I covered the top with foil, and returned to a 300F oven for about 20 more minutes. By this time, the loaf is dark brown, bordering on burned. I'll call it very caramelized, as it tastes fine.

I let the loaf cool in the pan for about 20 minutes (I lost track of time). When I come back, the top has sunk like a sad souffle. I cut off the end and it's still raw inside. Not underdone; sticky raw. Not runny, but sticky and not good to eat.

What the heck went wrong? My oven temp is good and has never given me a problem before. The recipe called for it to bake for an hour.

I'm really dissappointed in this.


DON'T PANIC


You live and learn. At any rate, you live..

- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Meryl's picture

(post #63283, reply #1 of 17)

Glass pans and dark pans conduct more heat than shiny ones, therefore, one needs to lower the temperature by 25 degrees when using them. It sounds like your heat was too high for the pan, and hence, it baked the outside too fast, which left the inside underbaked. That's just one possiblity - I'm sure you'll get more responses and analyses from the other bakers here.


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63283, reply #2 of 17)

That was my first thought, but I just couldn't remember if it was "lower the heat" or "raise the heat" for glass. I figured leaving it be was safest. Guessed wrong.

Good thing I got about 4 pounds of bananas for $.99! I'll just make more tomorrow.


DON'T PANIC


You live and learn. At any rate, you live..

- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Lword's picture

(post #63283, reply #3 of 17)

> i used a blue glass Pyrex loaf pan, which I've not done before


If before you used a clear Pyrex I would think there is something else going on besides a different pan. Is it possible your oven has changed its temperature? If neither of these, yes, it was too hot an oven. Sorry. Maybe you can recook the undercooked part and make a pudding.


L.
L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63283, reply #4 of 17)

I think I'm going to slice it up, toast it in the oven until it's not gooey anymore and then make french toast out of it, or a bread pudding...still tasty, but not what I was craving...wah!

I've not used my pyrex for anything other than casseroles or meat loaf before. I just happened to grab it, and figured what the hay? I'll be using my real loaf pans tomorrow.

Thanks for the help, guys. It's good to know the recipe is good; Mom likes the idea of all that banana. A new pan is easy to fix.


DON'T PANIC


You live and learn. At any rate, you live..

- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Lword's picture

(post #63283, reply #5 of 17)

Yep, definitely the Pyrex and oven temp. Meat casseroles are good in glass as they get a bit of a crust. Your French toast idea sounds wonderful! If Mom is a real banana lover you can add some sliced banana when serving.

L.

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63283, reply #6 of 17)

Thanks for your help. Upon closer inspection, I've discovered that the bananas have sunk to the bottom, accounting for some of the stickiness, I'm sure.

The top half of the bread is too dry and overcooked, and the bottom half is rawish and sticky.

I think maybe I had too much baking powder or baking soda...not sure which.

About halfway through cooking, the loaf was about 3 or 4 inches above the lip of the pan; much larger than my usual loaf.

Then, of course, it sank to about 4 inches high all told.

Perhaps more flour, less leavening and an aluminum pan or lower heat next time?


DON'T PANIC


You live and learn. At any rate, you live..

- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

Lword's picture

(post #63283, reply #7 of 17)

>Perhaps more flour, less leavening and an aluminum pan or lower heat next time?


I'd try one variation at a time, and start with using a metal pan.


I made banana bread almost once a week [edit: in a metal pan] for at least two years but that was so long ago that I don't remember any other information but mine never popped over the top to that extent or sunk appreciably. You will figure it out, I know!


L.


Edited 10/20/2004 2:14 am ET by Lword

L.
"If you can't feed a hundred people, then feed just one." Mother Teresa
leeannr's picture

(post #63283, reply #8 of 17)

I've got a touchy banana bread recipe, too. I need to cook it at 325° for 1 hour and 25 minutes, in a glass pan. It's absolutely perfect and delicious when it's done, but it needs the lower temp and longer cooking time.

One other thing I've noticed: if I want the bread to turn out perfectly (and who doesn't?) I need to measure the mashed bananas, and not just mash up what I think I need in there and toss them in. The size of the bananas in a recipe makes a huge difference. (Yes, size DOES matter, lol)

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63283, reply #9 of 17)

Banana Nut Bread #65535 by MEAN CHEF | my other recipes | e-mail me



from Nancy Silverton's "Pastries from La Brea Bakery." — Jun 25, 2003

2/3
 
cup walnuts (2 1/2 ounces)

2/3
 
cup pecans (2 1/2 ounces)

3-4
 
bananas, very ripe,mashed to equal 1 1/4 cups,plus

1
 
whole banana (to garnish)

2
 
extra-large eggs

1 1/2
 
teaspoons pure vanilla extract

4
 
ounces unsalted butter, chilled and cut into 1 inch cubes

1 1/4
 
teaspoons baking soda

1 1/2
 
teaspoons baking powder

3/4
 
teaspoon kosher salt

1
 
teaspoon ground cinnamon

3/4
 
teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

1/4
 
teaspoon ground cloves (scant)

1
 
tablespoon poppy seed

1/2
 
cup granulated sugar, plus

1
 
teaspoon sugar, extra for sprinkling

6
 
tablespoons light brown sugar, lightly packed

1 1/2
 
cups unbleached all-purpose flour


1 loaf Change size or US/metric | 2 hour 30 minutes 30 mins prep




1. 
lightly coat a six Cup capacity loaf pan, with melted butter.

2. 
Adjust the oven rack to the middle position and preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

3. 
Spread the nuts pn a baking sheet and toast in the oven until lighly browned, about 8-10 min.

4. 
Shake the pan halfway through to ensure that the nuts toast evenly.

5. 
Cool, chop coarsely, and set aside.

6. 
Turn the oven up to 350 degrees.

7. 
In a medium bowl, whisk the banana puree, eggs, and vanilla extract to combine.

8. 
In the bowl, of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle, attachment, cream the butter, baking soda, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and poppy seeds on low, 2 to 3 minutes, until softened.

9. 
Add the sugars and turn the mixer up to medium, mixing another 3 to 4 minutes until fluffy, scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.

10. 
Add the flour and banana mixture alternately in three batches, beginning with the flour, mixing until just combined.

11. 
Remove the bowl from the mixer and fold in the nuts.

12. 
Pour the batter into prepared loaf pan to just below the rim.

13. 
Cut two 1/4 inch thick strips from the remaining banana, slicing down the entire length.

14. 
Arrange the two C-shapes on top of the loaf, staggered, with the two ends slightly interlocking with each other in the center.

15. 
Sprinkle about one tsp.

16. 
of granulated sugar over the surface.

17. 
Bake for 50-60 minutes until nicely browned and firm to the touch.

18. 
Do not slice bananas for the top too thickly or they will sink.

AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #63283, reply #10 of 17)

Any suggestions on how to tweak my recipe? I really like the extra banana taste and we don't do nuts or spices in our banana bread.


DON'T PANIC

You live and learn. At any rate, you live..
- Douglas Adams

 

Save the Earth! It's the only planet with wine and chocolate.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63283, reply #11 of 17)

Use two smaller metal pans

jocelyng's picture

(post #63283, reply #12 of 17)

I've made this and it was a huge hit.  Really delicious and unusual.


Jocelyn

Glenys's picture

(post #63283, reply #13 of 17)

Unusual. Well that's apropo for MC isn't it?

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63283, reply #14 of 17)

Look who's talking.

Glenys's picture

(post #63283, reply #15 of 17)

You're awake are you? Are your ears burning while Washington sizzles at the 'fest?

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #63283, reply #16 of 17)

I imagine they are having a bit of entertainment at my expense.

Syrah's picture

(post #63283, reply #17 of 17)

Have I missed something??? Why would you say that??

"The truth lies in between the first and the fortieth drink" Tori Amos, Concertina

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie