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A baking tip...

Biscuit's picture

A baking tip... (post #64424)

in

Have you ever had the occasion where you were baking cakes at night?  And you are exhausted?  So you measure and mix and pour and bake - and then it comes out of the oven and you have to wait until it cools enough to de-pan it, and then wait some more for it to cool even further so you can wrap it in plastic before you go to bed, but this can take a couple of hours, and it's 1 a.m. and  there is nothing on TV that can keep you awake that long, and even if it did, you need to get up in 5 hours?  Ever had that happen to you?


Well - I learned a little trick last night.  Someone smarter than I has probably already learned this, but it was new to me.


I baked a bundt cake (forgot I had refreshments for todays PTA meeting).  Because I was converting a recipe from loaf pan to bundt form, I had to double the recipe, then extend the cooking time.  Waiting 20 minutes after it comes out of the oven to de-pan, then I was so dead I couldn't stay awake anymore, but I couldn't just leave the cake out uncovered.  So I  loosely wrapped a clean dish towel around the cake, put it on a plate, then tented the entire thing with plastic.


This morning - the plastic wrap was wet with condensation from the cake cooling, but when I pulled off the towel - the cake was perfect underneath.  The condensation from cooling rose to the plastic but the towel protected it from the moisture dripping back onto the cake and making it gummy and wet.


Yay!


Anyway - something to keep in mind next time this happens to you.  Unfortunately, it seems to happen to me way too often these day (g).


 


I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

MadMom's picture

(post #64424, reply #1 of 15)

I hope you're sending that in, because I think it's a great tip!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

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shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64424, reply #2 of 15)

I agree. I'm putting that tip someplace where I'll see it -- in theory, it should work for bread, pies, anything baked.





"the meat was prime,/the produce sublime,/but nevertheless/the dinner was/a horrible mess."
Samchang, 2007

MadMom's picture

(post #64424, reply #3 of 15)

It really is neat, because I'm often in too much of a hurry to wrap things, so don't let them cool enough.  The towel seems like the perfect solution.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Sondra's picture

(post #64424, reply #4 of 15)

Brilliant!  However accidental, that is freaking brilliant!

beebuzzled's picture

(post #64424, reply #5 of 15)

I usually wrap in a tea towel, leave on a cooling wrack and loosely cover in parchment with the same good results. I often bake in the evening if the kids/their friends/DH decide that they really feel like having (insert already-baked good here) during the evening and I don't have enough for lunches the next day.


 


Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
knitpik's picture

(post #64424, reply #6 of 15)

I've used the dish towel for my breads but the addition of plastic wrap is a great idea...specially here where it's very dry in winter. Thanks for the tip, Biscuit. And please send it in.

Just one question, did you remove the rack before wrapping or did you leave it under the cake?

madnoodle's picture

(post #64424, reply #7 of 15)

I just throw a dish towel over the cake or muffins or cookies or whatever, and don't bother with the plastic wrap.  I "invented" this method the same way you did--out of sheer exhaustion.  I've been doing it for years.

Saskatchewan:  our mountain-removal project is nearly complete.

What if there were no hypothetical questions?

 

Jean's picture

(post #64424, reply #8 of 15)

I want to make some jelly doughnuts to bring to Bible study in a couple of weeks but don't want to get up early to make them. I wonder how it would work to make them the night before and do your towel trick. I'd probably fill them in the morning however. Do you think they would stay fresh?



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Biscuit's picture

(post #64424, reply #10 of 15)

I don't know, but it's worth a try.  Let me know how it works, though!

I'm not mean - you're just a sissy.

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

debpasc's picture

(post #64424, reply #11 of 15)

Big disclaimer first, not a baker, not an expert.  However, I read somewhere that yeast dough tends to raise too fast at altitude and it was suggested that the dough be refrigerated over night to slow it down, then baked next day.  For me, this was perfect for making cinnamon rolls that I wanted to serve fresh for breakfast or brunch -- since retiring after getting up for work at 5 A.M. every morning there's nothing that can get me up that early again!  Anyhow, I've done it many times now with really good results.  Don't know if it's because I'm at 5,300 feet or if it works regardless of altitude.

Jean's picture

(post #64424, reply #12 of 15)

I've always had problems with an overnight rise getting them to rise enough to bake for breakfast. Maybe for lunch. Perhaps my refrigerator is too cold, I don't know.


What I wanted to do was to fry them in the evening cover them, like Biscuit suggested and then  fill and glaze them in the morning. I could try it and if it's a failure make a quick emergency trip to the bakery. shrug.




Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
debpasc's picture

(post #64424, reply #14 of 15)

You could try it and if it's a failure -- overnight them to me!  How could fried dough ever be a failure!!!  My Mom was a good baker and I grew up on fresh baked goods -- she made these all the time -- we called them Bismarks.  Those were the days!

Jean's picture

(post #64424, reply #15 of 15)

That's what we called them too. :0



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

(post #64424, reply #13 of 15)

Doughs will rise faster and higher with the same amount of yeast at a higher altitude, so refrigerating them overnight helps counteract this.  If you are going to bake them as soon as they rise, you should decrease the amount of yeast you use.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

unbaked's picture

(post #64424, reply #9 of 15)

That's a great tip, definitely send it in!

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine