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Assibams? Rye/Caraway Sourdough Starter

mangiaFagioli's picture

Assibams, you mentioned (early in the sourdough thread) a simple sourdough starter with only rye, caraway, and water, your directions just said make slurry and leave out for a couple of days. Any chance you can give me a little more info on this? I'm kind of a novice at this. Thanks

assibams's picture

(post #63444, reply #1 of 7)

Sure can :-)


Actually there is not much more to what you mention. I normally start with around 2 cups of rye and almost the same amount of water, add some crushed caraway (1Tbs), stir well, cover with a cloth and put on top of the fridge. After about 3 days it has fermented enough to form bubbles and has a pleasantly sour aroma. Add another cup or so of rye, some more water and let rest overnight. In the morning you are ready to make your dough.


The proportions of sourdough to rye flour are 1 part starter to 2 parts flour plus enough water (I add salt and bread spices with the water) to make a softish, sticky dough. To make higher loaves you can add some spelt or wheat flour to the dough. Proceed as with every other bread: let rise in a lightly floured bowl, dust with flour, cover, and set aside until the dough has just begun to swell. Take out of the bowl, shape, and put into your proofing basket or set the shaped loaf directly onto parchment. Let the loaf proof - depending on the temperature in your kitchen this can take anywhere from 2-4 hours - until it has risen considerably. Slash and put into the preheated oven. I preheat it to 450°F, pour some water on the bottom - or into a pan on the bottom of the oven - to build up steam before putting the bread in the oven. I add some more water with the bread. Lower the temp to 410°. After 10-15 minutes I open the oven door to let the steam escape, and continue baking until done and nicely browned.


I save about 1/3 of the starter in a lidded, plastic container in the fridge. It stays good for at least a week without feeding. Just add more flour and water the night before baking and let rise.


Another important thing: do not use any metal bowls for the starter or the dough. For some reason the dough will not rise in metal.


"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63444, reply #2 of 7)

I'm so glad you posted this , since I've been meaning to ask you for this recipe since I tasted your delicious bread last week!


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
assibams's picture

(post #63444, reply #3 of 7)

*blush* Thank you!


That recipe is for the dark rye. The emergency snack for the flight was the buttermilk wheat (which is even easier) - btw, did you survive the flight without waking your seat neighbor with your growling tummy ;-)


"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Aberwacky's picture

(post #63444, reply #4 of 7)

I enjoyed both breads, and have been dying to try out my new baking stone(s)--can you share the buttermilk wheat recipe, too?


I've been meaning to thank you for my in-flight snack selection.  I ate every crumb you gave me--it was FAR superior to the indefinable meal they served.  They called it goulash, but it doesn't even belong on the same planet as yours.


Leigh

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
assibams's picture

(post #63444, reply #6 of 7)

Blushing again.


For the wheat I just followed Reinhardt's instructions for pate fermente (very loosely I might add). He describes how in France a portion of the dough would be reserved for next day's baking. Sooo, all I did was make a basic yeasted wheat dough, no eggs, no fat, and baked a loaf, but reserved 250g (around 1/2lb) before I added salt to the dough.


That 'old' dough stays in my fridge until I need it - I have had that starter for almost 2 years now. When ready to bake I take it out, let it come to room temp (when I am lazy I just add warmer than usual liquid to the cold dough) and add twice the weight in flour (500g), plus enough liquid (water or buttermilk) to form a soft dough. I did not use the KA until I got the consistency and its feel right, but now the KA speeds things up quite a bit. I save 250g of the dough for future breads, then add salt and finish kneading. Let rise in a floured bowl, dusted with some flour, covered, until considerably swelled - not doubled. Shape and let proof until almost doubled in size. This bread is pretty hard to overproof, even an hour over the ideal stage gave good results.


Preheat the oven to the hottest setting (long enough so the stone is hot, as well, my thick one takes well over one hour to be hot, check with an oven thermometer) add water to build up some steam. Slash the loaf and slide onto the stone, add some more water. After a couple of minutes reduce the oven temp to 225-230°C, slightly open the door to release the steam and let bake until done. If you want a glossy finish on your bread brush with cold water as soon as it comes out of the oven.


"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

mangiaFagioli's picture

(post #63444, reply #5 of 7)

Thanks Assibams, will give it a try next week.

assibams's picture

(post #63444, reply #7 of 7)

Good luck, and don't hesitate to ask more questions.

"...never forget that the first syllable of convenience is con."
Bill Bryson

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright