NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

Aarrgghh! A bungled bundt!

shywoodlandcreature's picture

Okay, there must be more to it thatn just greasing and flouring the bundt pan thoroughly. How do you experts get the cake out of the pan without it falling to pieces? I'm using a nine-cup, Cathedral Nordicware bundt pan. When the cake came out of the oven, I turned it over a plate to cool, let it cool for about half and hour or three-quarters of an hour, then bunged it out of the pan, with a little help from a knife slipped around the edges to help loosen it. Approximately one quarter of the cake looks like it's supposed to look -- gorgeous. The other three quarters are tasty little shapeless chunks. What did I do wrong? (I'm going to serve it anyway - I've glazed with an apricot/Southern Comfort syrup, and will cover with berries macerating in Creme de Cassis, so I don't think the bum aesthetics will kill the whole effect. But still...)





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Jean's picture

(post #64031, reply #68 of 86)

Amazing!



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
schnitzel's picture

(post #64031, reply #69 of 86)

I've always liked jello molds and this one's a doozy. ;·)


courgette's picture

(post #64031, reply #70 of 86)

I think it's really cool. It would be great for a casual family barbeque.  Next year!


Mo

Jean's picture

(post #64031, reply #71 of 86)

So it would be the pièce de résistance of your picnic table. I know several people in my family who would eat it and love it--and it's not the kids. LOL. I made oodles of jello-beans and  molded eggs at Easter last year, just for kicks, and my 60 Yr old son-in-law thought he'd died and gone to heaven. LOL. I should make one just for him for Thanksgiving Day. I think I will.



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
schnitzel's picture

(post #64031, reply #74 of 86)

I made oodles of jello-beans and molded eggs at Easter last year


I don't think I've heard of these?  Off to Google. . .

I'm back. Found this: Jello Beans  So, where did you buy the mold?



Edited 9/10/2006 8:55 am ET by schnitzel

Marcia's picture

(post #64031, reply #76 of 86)

I've seen such molds in Kraft ads around Easter, and you send away to Kraft for them. It might be that other places have them now, however.

schnitzel's picture

(post #64031, reply #78 of 86)

Yup, I found molds on the Kraft site and eBay.


schnitzel's picture

(post #64031, reply #73 of 86)

Very retro!
Our family gatherings always included a jello mold. And my mom would make a three-layer mold for Christmas—red, white, and green. ;·) Such fun.


shoechick's picture

(post #64031, reply #72 of 86)

 and I probably would serve it, for the right occasion. :-)


An LSD party comes to mind :)


Cinderella is proof that shoes can change your life....

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

Marcia's picture

(post #64031, reply #75 of 86)

An LSD party comes to mind :)


Heehee.

schnitzel's picture

(post #64031, reply #77 of 86)

...or church potlucks, just imagine the oohs and aahs.  ;·)


CookiM0nster's picture

(post #64031, reply #79 of 86)

For some reason I keep reading this as LDS, which works too, at least around here.

mer's picture

(post #64031, reply #80 of 86)

LOL.  Finally, there's something that the LDS and the LSD parties have in common.  :) 


omg.

Marcia's picture

(post #64031, reply #81 of 86)

What's funny is that it does work - for me, at least.

marie-louise's picture

(post #64031, reply #82 of 86)

Too bad it's still Jello.

Jean's picture

(post #64031, reply #83 of 86)

LOL



My mother's menu consisted of two choices: Take it or leave it.

- Buddy Hackett

http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Marcia's picture

(post #64031, reply #84 of 86)

I grew up in the South, and have something of a penchant for jellied foods. I love Trader Joe's Blackberry Crush juice, lightly jelled with plain Knox gelatin.


Jello is always a misfortune.

deejeh's picture

(post #64031, reply #85 of 86)

The Fannie Farmer cookbook has a recipe for orange gelatin, made with freshly squeezed juice, some sugar (I think) and Knox gelatin.  It's a lovely, light dessert.


The Blackberry Crush sounds delicious - I'll have to look for something similar, since we don't have a TJ here.


deej

Aberwacky's picture

(post #64031, reply #86 of 86)

I love fruit gelatins made with Knox and fruit juice.  Not the same as Jello at all!


Leigh


How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
moxie's picture

(post #64031, reply #66 of 86)

You're right about the kids. My daughter walked by as I was reading and exclaimed "what is that beautiful thing???!!!!" LOL

"I have always relied on the kindness of strangers." - Blanche Dubois

RuthWells's picture

(post #64031, reply #22 of 86)

A release spray containing flour (either Pam with flour or Baker's Joy brands), applied verrrrrrrrrrrrrrry liberally, does the trick for me. 


Edited to chime in on the 10 minute rule -- I've never heard of this and never adhere to it, and never have a problem (as long as I've sprayed liberally as per paragraph #1).


Edited to clarify -- the cake must be cool before de-panning, and my tendency is to cool for LONGER than 10 minutes.  I'm sure that an attempt to de-pan any earlier than 10 minutes is a recipe for cake chunks.


 



Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw


Edited 8/28/2006 9:34 am ET by RuthWells


Edited 8/28/2006 9:35 am ET by RuthWells

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Aberwacky's picture

(post #64031, reply #27 of 86)

Charlotte advised me to butter (melted) and flour the pan, then chill it before pouring in the batter.


Since I started doing that, my bundts look like they're supposed to.


Leigh


How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64031, reply #28 of 86)

Oh, good suggestion! Advice from Charlotte is always worth taking. Thanks.





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

laserbeam's picture

(post #64031, reply #32 of 86)

Don't you just hate it when only part of a cake unmolds?!  For Bundt cakes, I use the method I learned in cooking school, which is to brush the pan well with softened butter.  We used to use a KA to whip the butter in class, but you don't need very much for just 1 cake, so I don't bother with that step.  The brush gets into all of the little nookers and crannies, and I have no problems with unmolding, even when using the more elaborate Bundt pans.  As others have noted, it's also important to let the cake rest for 10 minutes on a rack before inverting.

crazyoverquilting's picture

(post #64031, reply #43 of 86)

What a disappointment that must have been!  The cathedral pan is the one that I had the worst luck with (I had them all at one point) but the main thing is to thoroughly grease all those little nooks and crannies.  You could make a paste with butter and flour (or if you've made a chocolate cake use butter and cocoa) and use a pastry brush to get it into all those little places.  When the cake comes out of the oven, don't turn it upside down.  Let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes (15 at the longest) and then turn it out.  It should just drop right out.  I believe that even if you thoroughly greased the pan, you allowed the cake to cool too much before trying to get it out.  Sometimes I will butter the pan and then instead of flour I use granulated sugar and that makes a really nice outside for the cake.  About 6 months ago I gave away all but my very favorite bundt pans because they were taking over my entire apartment.  Now I have the sunflower (my favorite), the rose, a 6-cake mini pan, a 6-cup "regular" pan and the 60th anniversary classic pan.  I never have  a problem removing cakes from any of these.  Oh, I also have the castle but haven't made anything in it yet.  Good luck to you!


Doughfingers

Cooking Mom's picture

(post #64031, reply #61 of 86)

I have had the same experience with my cathedral bundt - mostly with FC's cranberry bundt (but then I eat most of the broken bits and make another one...).  My new technique is to use this "Cake Release" recipe (listed below) I found somewhere online.  I paint it into all the nooks and crannies (my bristle brush does a better job than a silicone one), then for extra insurance, sprinkle a little flour or cocoa over the greased pan and shake it out.  After baking, let the cake sit for 10 - 15 minutes to "sweat" (if it doesn't come out after 10, wait another 5).  I agree with the thumping the sides of the pan to loosen it.  Sometimes I have to use a plastic knife to loosen the cake around the center post.


Good luck!


 


 Cake Release


1/4 cup shortening


   3 tbsp oil


1/4 cup flour


 


Combine well; store in airtight container.  Does not need to be refrigerated.  Stir before each use.