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Aarrgghh! A bungled bundt!

shywoodlandcreature's picture

Okay, there must be more to it thatn just greasing and flouring the bundt pan thoroughly. How do you experts get the cake out of the pan without it falling to pieces? I'm using a nine-cup, Cathedral Nordicware bundt pan. When the cake came out of the oven, I turned it over a plate to cool, let it cool for about half and hour or three-quarters of an hour, then bunged it out of the pan, with a little help from a knife slipped around the edges to help loosen it. Approximately one quarter of the cake looks like it's supposed to look -- gorgeous. The other three quarters are tasty little shapeless chunks. What did I do wrong? (I'm going to serve it anyway - I've glazed with an apricot/Southern Comfort syrup, and will cover with berries macerating in Creme de Cassis, so I don't think the bum aesthetics will kill the whole effect. But still...)





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Adele's picture

(post #64031, reply #29 of 86)

It's a very slight taste- if you didn't know it was there, you wouldn't know it was there, if that makes sense.  I've also used powdered sugar in place of the cocoa lighter colored cakes.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

Duchess's picture

(post #64031, reply #41 of 86)

I made the chocolate sour cream bundt cake last Saturday and served it Sunday.  It was a huge hit with my family.  I checked out the Tried and True recipes when I was deciding what to make and found that recipe.  I used the butter and cocoa powder suggestion to grease the pan, and let the cake cool ten minutes before taking it out of the pan.  Everything worked perfectly.  I served it with the tangy whipped cream and raspberries.  I can always count on Cook's Talk for wonderful recipes and assistance, you are the best.  Thanks everyone for always being here to help me.


Dutchess

evelyn's picture

(post #64031, reply #19 of 86)

http://www.recipezaar.com/136654 Professional Baking Coating (seriously works)

Also, have you ever considered a silicone baking pan? I love the bundt one I've purchased and cakes just slide out (I do give them 20 minutes of cooling in pan first).

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64031, reply #30 of 86)

I had a silicone muffin pan, and hated it - the muffins always seemed soggy, so no, I haven't been tempted to get a silicon bundt pan. Others love it, I know, so it seems to be a classic case of "your mileage may vary".





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Glenys's picture

(post #64031, reply #36 of 86)

I have a few dark coated metal pans, the mini bundts, popovers, mini angel foods etc. I found they began to release better after a few uses, as if they cured a bit. Making savoury things in them, like Yorkshires, or eggy-cheesy bread puddings for breakfast helped the process along.

Pumpkie's picture

(post #64031, reply #38 of 86)

For all the bundt pan lovers W&S has two new nordicware bundt pans for the fall, a new mini pumpkin pan (a bunch of single little pumpkins) and a stadium pan.  Of course I feel the urge to get the pumpkin pan even though I have the bigger one but I've not caved in yet and the stadium one is interesting but I don't feel compelled to get it!

Ricks503's picture

(post #64031, reply #39 of 86)

But you NEEED them to help keep your collection current.


 


LOL


1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Pumpkie's picture

(post #64031, reply #40 of 86)

See that is what I tell my husband!  Seriously what is it with these pans, its like a compulsion!  I have not stopped thinking of the mini pumpkin pan, like I need another nordic ware pan or a smaller pumpkin one!  Of course I'm not obsessed with the stadium one but the dang pumpkin one is callling me.

Ricks503's picture

(post #64031, reply #42 of 86)

When we moved into the new house, DW demanded that I pare down to 4 of my jello molds - claimed there were an eyesore hanging on the wall.  I do not, and never did,  have the Bundt pan collecting bug, but I was collecting Jello molds. I had been up to 13 when we moved and was told to get rid of them

1 - measure the board twice, 2 - cut it once, 3 - measure the space where it is supposed to go        4 - get a new board and go back to step 1

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

crazyoverquilting's picture

(post #64031, reply #44 of 86)

I've never used silicone anything, but from what I've heard, nothing browns in those things.  Why bother if what you end up with looks anemic?


Doughfingers

evelyn's picture

(post #64031, reply #45 of 86)

my bundt cakes always come out a lovely golden-brown - not as dark as in my dark, standard-issue (metal) bundt pans, but a lovely colour, nonetheless.

 

In life, learn the rules so that you know how to break them properly.
crazyoverquilting's picture

(post #64031, reply #46 of 86)

Off topic, but I'm wondering where this name came from?  I registered here as Doughfingers yet it thinks I'm crazyoverquilting -- which I am.  There are gremlins here aren't there?


Doughfingers (or crazyoverquilting?)

Adele's picture

(post #64031, reply #47 of 86)

I used a silicone bundt pan for the first time today.  It was a Christmas gift.  I don't know if it browned or or not because it was a dark ginger cake and is brown inside and out.    I didn't care for the look.  It wasn't nice and smooth, sort of holey looking on top, not attractive at all.


(At least now I can tell my Mom I used it- LOL)


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

mer's picture

(post #64031, reply #48 of 86)

While the weather is nice and hot, use it as a mold to make an ice cream cake.

Adele's picture

(post #64031, reply #49 of 86)

Much better idea than just keeping it on top of the crockpot to keep the dust off the lid.  :)

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

mer's picture

(post #64031, reply #50 of 86)

LOL> Sure would be an expensive crock pot lid dust cover. :) Funny.

I was about to say, use it as a jello mold. I know nobody likes jello anymore, but once a year I will have some. I just love those vibrant colors. Reminds me of my grandmother.

TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #51 of 86)

Apparently it does make a lovely Jello mold:


jellomold.jpg


 


 


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

mer's picture

(post #64031, reply #52 of 86)

OMG! That's exactly the photo that I was thinking of when I was posting but I didn't want to go through explaining the Jello competition that produced such a wonderous beauty!! LOL!.

There is also this one, which is much more restrained and adult::
http://gorgeoustown.typepad.com/lex_culinaria/2005/05/imbb_15_chapter.html

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64031, reply #53 of 86)

Wow! I would love to try that in my cathedral bundt.





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

KitchenWitch's picture

(post #64031, reply #54 of 86)

AAAIIEEEE! My eyes! (the goggles do nothing)


~RuthAnn


CT poster in bad standing since 1998

~RuthAnn

Jean's picture

(post #64031, reply #55 of 86)

Oh, my! Bad Poster!



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TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #57 of 86)

Heh. Why should today be any different from any previous day? ;-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

macy's picture

(post #64031, reply #58 of 86)

I'm getting really good results using a light, even coating of Pam with Flour for Baking. But, I think part of it is this wonderful new platinum series non-stick finish. I love the new 60th Anniversary Bundt.



Here's the latest cake made in this pan. I used the Ice Water Chocolate Cake, because I needed to make sure there was enough batter to fill the pan. I think the volume was just about perfect.



 

 
Adele's picture

(post #64031, reply #59 of 86)

Very nice!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

macy's picture

(post #64031, reply #60 of 86)

Thanks! It really is a beautiful pan. I'm going to have to try some monkey breads and coffee cakes in it too.

Adele's picture

(post #64031, reply #56 of 86)

Shoot, I have a red x.   Can't see the pic.


EDIT- didn't want to delete, it finally came up.  Aaargh!


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!


Edited 8/31/2006 9:29 am ET by Adele

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

pamilyn's picture

(post #64031, reply #63 of 86)

I am probably the only person on this board who thinks that is pretty. I wouldn't want to eat it, I wouldn't want to serve it,  but I think it is pretty. If I were a kid I would LOVE it. All those pretty rainbow colors. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #64 of 86)

LOL... I kind of like it myself... and I probably would serve it, for the right occasion. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

mer's picture

(post #64031, reply #65 of 86)

I wasn't kidding when I said that i loved it.  :)  I haven't yet made it, but it would be fun for a party, especially if it was adult jello.  :)  I wonder how the flavors would combine..  I guess it would be best if you determined a flavor and used knox gelatin, then added the colors in layers. 

schnitzel's picture

(post #64031, reply #67 of 86)

For inquiring minds, here's the recipe: Rainbow Gelatin Mold