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Aarrgghh! A bungled bundt!

shywoodlandcreature's picture

Okay, there must be more to it thatn just greasing and flouring the bundt pan thoroughly. How do you experts get the cake out of the pan without it falling to pieces? I'm using a nine-cup, Cathedral Nordicware bundt pan. When the cake came out of the oven, I turned it over a plate to cool, let it cool for about half and hour or three-quarters of an hour, then bunged it out of the pan, with a little help from a knife slipped around the edges to help loosen it. Approximately one quarter of the cake looks like it's supposed to look -- gorgeous. The other three quarters are tasty little shapeless chunks. What did I do wrong? (I'm going to serve it anyway - I've glazed with an apricot/Southern Comfort syrup, and will cover with berries macerating in Creme de Cassis, so I don't think the bum aesthetics will kill the whole effect. But still...)





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Pumpkie's picture

(post #64031, reply #1 of 86)

Hi, Did you turn it over on the plate while it was still hot?  I leave mine to cool in the pan a while before flipping especially with the specialty pans.  I do not grease any of mine, just use a non cook spray and I haven't had a problem yet, now where is that wood I need to knock on lol

ashleyd's picture

(post #64031, reply #2 of 86)

What did I do wrong?


At the risk of truly p***ing off 99% of this board the answer is you used a bundt pan. An abomination of form over function. I duly expect serious abuse, probably well deserved.



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marie-louise's picture

(post #64031, reply #4 of 86)

Ashley-LOL. Personally, I love bundt cakes.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64031, reply #6 of 86)

Yes, I can agree, intellectually, that bundt pans are a function of hell. However, they just look so damned nice...





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

MadMom's picture

(post #64031, reply #9 of 86)

Maybe I have the right idea...just buy the damn things and never use them, LOL.



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TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #10 of 86)

That cranberry-almond bundt cake from some issue of FC is honestly one of the best cakes I've ever had. Yum.

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

VAgardengirl's picture

(post #64031, reply #12 of 86)

TracyK, could I bother you for that recipe, please?  It sounds like something I would like to serve for Christmas Open House.


 


Thank you.

When the miseries strike and you're down in the dumps, food transformed by love and memory becomes therapy.

TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #14 of 86)

Yep...  http://www.recipezaar.com/recipe/getrecipe.zsp?id=75620


It is SOOOOO good.


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

VAgardengirl's picture

(post #64031, reply #18 of 86)

Thank you so much!

When the miseries strike and you're down in the dumps, food transformed by love and memory becomes therapy.

TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #34 of 86)

You're welcome! It is SOOO good. My family is not a cake family (we are pie people, LOL) and everyone scarfed it down.

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

VAgardengirl's picture

(post #64031, reply #37 of 86)

We are "pie people," too!  I always have a "birthday pie" on my birthday.  ;)  But this is a wonderful sounding cake.  Perfect for the function.


I sure do appreciate you posting this.

When the miseries strike and you're down in the dumps, food transformed by love and memory becomes therapy.

courgette's picture

(post #64031, reply #13 of 86)

I've made that cake and mailed it to my mother the last two years at Christmas. She loved it. It helps, of course, that it's cold.at that time of year.


Mo

Marcia's picture

(post #64031, reply #15 of 86)

But it can be baked in a tube pan, and would be just as good, if not so pretty.


Confession time...I'm not a bundt fan, but neither am I a willing baker, so I hate to comment.

TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #16 of 86)

But isn't that true of virtually any cake recipe?


I don't understand the position of "not being a Bundt fan." It's just a pan. Same cake, different shape.


 



CT poster in bad standing since 2000.


Edited 8/27/2006 11:26 pm ET by TracyK

Marcia's picture

(post #64031, reply #17 of 86)

I get that you don't understand, and realize it's a sort of strange position. I'll think about it. Maybe some overnight insight will pop up, although it's doubtful. Perhaps it's as simple as not finding the shape of a traditional bundt pan aesthetically pleasing. I believe it's as simple as that.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64031, reply #11 of 86)

yeah, even as I was cursing the damned bundt pan, I was whining to P about how much I'd love, no, NEED!) to have all the different forms, just to hang on the wall...





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Glenys's picture

(post #64031, reply #31 of 86)

Being the great cake baker that I am, I recently found out that bundt pans and recipes geared to them, make owning one a requirement. I measured all my tube pans and found that no brand or style makes one as large, so bundt pan purchase it was. All that to test a recipe.

deejeh's picture

(post #64031, reply #3 of 86)

There are 2 things required.  The first is this:



or something like it.  Once you've given the pan a good spray, take a silicone brush and go over all the little pattern bits to be sure they're coated.


The second thing is, when the pan comes out of the oven, cool it on a rack for 10 minutes exactly.  Turn it out onto the rack to finish cooling.  I swear this will work.  I've made the rose and fleur de lys pattern bundts often, and the cakes from both pans unmould without a problem.


deej

TracyK's picture

(post #64031, reply #5 of 86)

The Nordicware web site says:


Bake and then cool for 10 minutes before inverting. Place the pan on the center rack of the oven. Black or dark colored pans require a 25-degree Fahrenheit (10°C) heat reduction from the recommended oven temperature. Bake for time indicated and cool 10 minutes – no less, no longer. With hot pads, pick up the cake pan and gently shake the pan from side to side listening for thumping. This indicates cake is loose and ready to invert. A plastic knife may be used to carefully loosen the cake around the center tube and sides if sticking persists.


 


CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64031, reply #8 of 86)

Thanks, all. I only make bundt cakes about once a year, but next time I will remember the 10 minute rule.





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984

Glenys's picture

(post #64031, reply #33 of 86)

It makes perfect sense, it literally sweats in the pan, making the crust soft and the entire cake is loosened. A good rap and it finishes the job.

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #64031, reply #35 of 86)

Obviously the more elaborate the bundt design the more likely there will be trouble dismounting the cake.


Generally the culprits will be underbaking or inadequate greasing/flouring of the pan.  Having made hundreds of bundt cakes, I honestly don't think it makes much difference when you take it out of the pan as long as it is not hot.


In a pinch freezing for a while will improve the odds of a clean release.


pamilyn's picture

(post #64031, reply #62 of 86)

"unmounting?"   (G)

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

Adele's picture

(post #64031, reply #7 of 86)

I have a bundt pan that doesn't have all the deep indentations and nooks and crannies but it does have some.  I was about to throw it out, as I could never get the darn cake out all in one piece.  Then someone here mentioned melted butter and cocoa powder (or use powdered sugar).  I now apply this with a brush and haven't since had a problem with release.  I use this method for every thing I bake now.


 


But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #64031, reply #20 of 86)

Somewhere, I have a recipe for the cake that used the brushed on chocolate in the bundt pan.  I can not find it at the present time. 


Does anyone have a clue as to what the cake recipe might be? 


I found it!  A really good recipe.


...and it is "Chocolate Sour Cream Bundt Cake", posted by Meryl


 
Meryl  
3/9/2005 6:45 pm 

 
 
  

 
22065.1


Edited 8/28/2006 7:39 am ET by ICDOCEAN1

Jean's picture

(post #64031, reply #21 of 86)


Cake release:


1 Tablespoon butter, melted


1 Tablespoon cocoa


Stir together butter and cocoa in small bowl until paste forms; using a pastry brush, coat all interior surfaces of a standard 12-cup Bundt pan. (If mixture becomes too thick to brush on, microwave it for 10 to 20 seconds, or until warm and softened.)




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Adele's picture

(post #64031, reply #23 of 86)

Yup- that's what I use.  It's also nice because you can easily see the areas you might of missed the first time brushing.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

marie-louise's picture

(post #64031, reply #24 of 86)

Can you taste the chocolate in the finished cake, or is it a small enough amount that it is mostly there for color?

(Send that in as a tip!)

shoechick's picture

(post #64031, reply #25 of 86)

I have the Christmas Tree one, and talk about nooks and crannies.  I've never had it stick, I butter and flour or olive oil spray and flour.  I do however stick to the 10 minute rule.

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shywoodlandcreature's picture

(post #64031, reply #26 of 86)

Thanks to all. 10 minutes it is, from now on.





"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen."
George Orwell, 1984