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1/4 cup, 7 oz., 1/3 stick...

soupereasy's picture

Is there any way to agree on a way to measure butter? Why can't we just measure by weight? BLEAH!!!


Yes I can figure it out, but why make it so much trouble?


Actually I am with the tribe that weighs flour as well.


Then there are the recipes that call for 1oz. of this 2/3 cup of that and 1/4  stick of the other.


What brought this on? I am going to make 2 seperate recipes, one cookie, one cake. Wanted to make sure I had enough butter out of the freezer.


Non baker that I am,I prefer simple measures.


Whew!!


Edited 11/10/2009 10:05 pm ET by soupereasy

Risottogirl's picture

(post #65258, reply #1 of 55)

I agree. Let's weigh stuff. Using metrics.


:)


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

soupereasy's picture

(post #65258, reply #2 of 55)

You are the girl!;)


Everything else is in metric, including currency, why not?


Edited 11/10/2009 10:17 pm ET by soupereasy

Risottogirl's picture

(post #65258, reply #3 of 55)

I am totally holding back a huge rant. About why people are so resistant to weights in recipes.


Maybe two huge rants :) Second one about why we are the ONLY developed country that doesn't use metrics.


I cannot rant before bed time.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

soupereasy's picture

(post #65258, reply #4 of 55)

Have a cup of tea instead.


Have to say I agree with you!

paretsky's picture

(post #65258, reply #36 of 55)

Hey, don't look at me. I use metric weights whenever I bake.

For all of the rest of my cooking, I usually eyeball things, rather than go for specific measurements. But I've been cooking long enough to know how much a half teaspoon or a quarter cup is when I pour something into my hand.

"Light the lamp, not the rat! Light the lamp, not the rat!!"
Rizzo the Rat, A Muppet Christmas Carol

"Light the lamp, not the rat! Light the lamp, not the rat!!"
Rizzo the Rat, A Muppet Christmas Carol

CANDILADY's picture

(post #65258, reply #35 of 55)

I prefer weighing stuff too. Perhaps you can answer a question for me. My MIL has a measuring cup that she got in Germany that she uses for measuring metric recipes in grams. Explain to me how this could possibly work?? She uses it with success even on baked goods. I have not checked the cup out yet but have tasted her baking.

heleen's picture

(post #65258, reply #42 of 55)

I have one of those, and they are as accurate as the US cups (so not very accurate, *grin*). It's just a cup that has different measuring stripes painted on it, for grams of sugar, grams of flour, water, sometimes rice or other dry ingredients. So there's basically different''scales' printed on the cup, meaning the mark for 100 ml of water would be next to the mark for say, 50 grams of flour. Does that make sense?

CANDILADY's picture

(post #65258, reply #44 of 55)

It makes perfect sense! Thank you, I just could not figure out how a cup like that could work!

heleen's picture

(post #65258, reply #45 of 55)

Glad I was coherent ;o). I think they are even less accurate than your regular cup measures though...

Gretchen's picture

(post #65258, reply #5 of 55)

Never have weighed.  8 TBS=1/4#.  Works for me.  It's the way my cookbooks are written.   ;o)

Gretchen


Edited 11/10/2009 10:37 pm ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
soupereasy's picture

(post #65258, reply #6 of 55)

Shame a lot of recipes are not.

Gretchen's picture

(post #65258, reply #9 of 55)

Maybe--and as I have come very late in life to know, bread would be one of the major categories where weight is important. But I have countless cookbooks, and weight is just not a part of the mix in the directions.  What's to be done?!!


And, even in my bread class with Peter Reinhart--weight wasn't the end measurement of the ingredients.  Adjusted the dough consistency as it kneaded under the good brother's tutelage and advice.


I don't say it is not important and obviously more to some than others, but I have been able to struggle through in my benighted ways!   ;o0


Gretchen
Gretchen
Syrah's picture

(post #65258, reply #7 of 55)

ITA, but we have our own consistencies. You'll find recipes that call for 125g butter and a cup of flour in the same breath for instance.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained."
-Marie Curie
My perseverance will be rewarded.

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

heleen's picture

(post #65258, reply #8 of 55)

I wholeheartedly agree. The use of cup measurements for flour, for instance, drives me bonkers. I don't understand how cookbook writers use these imprecise measurements when in baking, it really *does* make a diffenrece whether you add 3.5 or 4.5 oz of flour. Grrrr. Irks me to no end ;o)  (how's that for a rant, hihi!) I use a kitchen scale for *everything* in baking.

Maedl's picture

(post #65258, reply #10 of 55)

I have been weighing for years, and have converted my recipes over that me. It's easier and much more accurate. I hate trying to spoon flour into a cup and trying to measure a cup of butter? Forget about it! My only complaint about measuring in metric is that the metric side of my scale is harder to read--but that could be changed easily with a new scale. I can't understand the resistance to going metric--it's so much easier.

Margie
Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay:
Where Food and Culture Intersect
www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com

Margie Between the Alps and the Chesapeake Bay: Where Food and Culture Intersect www.alpsandbay.blogspot.com
ashleyd's picture

(post #65258, reply #11 of 55)

It's not the metric bit that I'd go for, I'll work in metric or imperial, it's the use of volume measurement for something that should be weighed. Volume is fine for liquids and NOTHING ELSE!


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #65258, reply #12 of 55)

I'll grudgingly admit I'd be okay with weights in either.


I do love metric though, it is easier, everything divides by 10, what's not to love about that???


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

ashleyd's picture

(post #65258, reply #13 of 55)

I prefer metric, but small steps...


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

assibams's picture

(post #65258, reply #14 of 55)

I weigh, much easier than anything else. It amazes me that so many in the States, the land of kitchen gadgets and multiple (small) appliances, don't own kitchen scales. I'd much rather be without my food processor than my scales!


"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Gretchen's picture

(post #65258, reply #15 of 55)

WHAT can we do?!!!   I just have to say again, our cookbooks haven't been written for weights for the most part--probably certainly not until comparatively recently, if then. 
And we have been living in the land of convenience--nothing much more convenient than pulling out a stick of butter--what's to measure.

Gretchen

Gretchen
ashleyd's picture

(post #65258, reply #19 of 55)

nothing much more convenient than pulling out a stick of butter


Unless your butter doesn't come in sticks...



Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

roz's picture

(post #65258, reply #21 of 55)

<<<nothing much more convenient than pulling out a stick of butter

Unless your butter doesn't come in sticks...>>>

So true...or pounds.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
Gretchen's picture

(post #65258, reply #25 of 55)

Water displacement.  ;o)

Gretchen

Gretchen
Glenys's picture

(post #65258, reply #28 of 55)

Hear, hear!

Salzburg1's picture

(post #65258, reply #50 of 55)

I totally agree. However some of my old US cook books as well as modern US cooking magazines use this cup and ounce nonsense. To cure this I use an electronic scale which has ounces/pounds and the metric system. Through the years though I have learned that 250 grams of butter (as we don't get sticks in Europe) = to 1 cup. Everything else I have converted. I don't know why in the States the magazines can't also put the weight in as in Canada they also use the metric system.
The best scales to buy are the convertible ones. Cheap too.

assibams's picture

(post #65258, reply #51 of 55)

Hi there, and welcome to CT! Does your screenname indicate your location? If so, do you live in Salzburg Stadt or Land? My family lives in Hallein and I just visited them last weekend :-)


"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

nexus's picture

(post #65258, reply #53 of 55)

I LOVE your tag line. That's exactly what I do at work.


Cheryl

Salzburg1's picture

(post #65258, reply #54 of 55)

Yes I live in Salzburg. Love to bake and cook. Adore Fine Cooking which my mother gives me as an Xmas gift every year. The Best of the Best in Cooking magazines!
I also wrote the first and only restaurant guide to Salzburg which appeared in August 2007. Was and still is a best seller in the city.
Europeans have this stigma that North Americans don't know how to cook
but having lived in several countries in the world I have come to the conclusion that the Amis are really good cooks especially in the home.
The French are highly overrated, the Austrians, Germans and Hungarians are quite good at home cooking.
I get CARE packages from the New World - Chocolate chips, brown sugar and corn syrup - once a year.
Frohe Weihnachten

assibams's picture

(post #65258, reply #55 of 55)

Very cool (on the restaurant guide especially)! Salzburg is a very active region for good food, lots of really good places to eat throughout Land Salzburg, being a tourism-heavy area sure helps, also the culture and importance of good food and wine over the past centuries.


My dad is a born and bred Halleiner, and I spent my early childhood there. They have since moved back and are friends with a number of people in the culinary world in Salzburg.


Painting with a wide brush is often wrong, there are many people who love to and can cook all over this world, and many whose main focus definitely isn't food or even worse, having to prepare it themselves. I think the a lot around home cooking in various countries has to do with school systems. In countries where kids come home for lunch cooking at home is a must for families, plus the culture in Germany, Austria, Hungary, and many more was that the woman stayed home with the kids and took over the household. It is changing and I sure know many people in Europe who cannot and do not want to cook, for whom eating is merely fueling your body with whatever is available, and convenience products are all over the place in any supermarket.


I send my DH out for brown sugar, chocolate chips, and maple syrup (he's an airline pilot), regular syrup I can get in Sweden (my mom is Swedish and we spend the summer vacations there)


We really should meet up whenever I'm in Salzburg next time! Maybe a cup of coffee at Konditorei Braun in Hallein (on of my dad's oldest friends) they have such wonderful cakes and even worse, patisserie.



"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

cyalexa's picture

(post #65258, reply #52 of 55)

I do the same as you. In addition, when the recipe gives volumes, I look on the nutritional information panel to see the weight in grams of a volumetric serving size. A little arithmetic and I don't have to dirty a measuring cup.