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susielynn's picture

 Looing for :Apple pie recipe in Fine Cooking magazine about 2 years ago. It used sliced grannie smith and CUBED Rome or Courland apples and the cinnamon sugar mixture was sprinkled on the apples just before placing them in pie crust. I did the entire tutorial as the recipe stated and it was by far the best ever pie...EVER. My son will be visiting for Thanksgiving and I want to make this again for him. I recently moved and can not find my magazine. Please send info on back issue or the recipe. I really would be so thankful. Susielynn


 

schnitzel's picture

(post #62554, reply #1 of 38)

susielynn's picture

(post #62554, reply #2 of 38)

Thanks for the prompt reply. This is THE recipe and if you want to indulge in a fabulous apple pie..use this recipe. I so much appreciate you help. Susielynn

schnitzel's picture

(post #62554, reply #3 of 38)

You're very welcome.


chiquiNO's picture

(post #62554, reply #4 of 38)

Hummm....Carol uses Crisco shortening....wonder what the bakers think about that!!  Hers is very close to the ones used by the American Pie Cook off that everybody here thought was awful for using Crisco and butter flavor Crisco!!  I guess if shortening appears in Fine Cooking then it's ok!LOL

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #62554, reply #5 of 38)

Actually her recipe is very different from that pie-cook off. No vinegar, no egg, no butter flavored Crisco, and she uses actual, real butter.

Some Crisco or shortening in pie crust is OK. I don't begrudge people for using it. Personally I prefer all butter, but that's just me, and we all know how picky I am.

Butter flavor Crisco is completely different and really awful stuff, and I'd complain about it if it showed up in the magazine even more loudly than when anybody mentions it on this board!


Edited 11/2/2007 12:04 am by CookiM0nster

chiquiNO's picture

(post #62554, reply #10 of 38)

The recipe I use calls for both butter and shortening, too.  I don't use the butter flavor either.  I've tried it in the past with rolls that were dipped in butter and then baked.  The recipe calls for shortening in the dough and dipping in butter to bake.  I guess it was to enhance the imitation butter in the dough...LOL  Use only plain Crisco now.


 


Actually I'm surprised at her addition of baking powder.  ANy guess what that's for??



Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans


Edited 11/2/2007 6:40 am by chiquiNO

 

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #62554, reply #19 of 38)

The baking powder helps out the flakiness. Like shortening, (or vinegar or egg) it's another trick to help make up for imperfect technique.

The crust recipe I have from you, that I made when I did my pie crust bake-off years ago did call for butter flavor Crisco. I'm glad to see you've learned the error of your ways ;-)

The ones from the American pie bake-off that you've compared yours to, also called for the butter flavored stuff, but then the contest was sponsored by Crisco.

chiquiNO's picture

(post #62554, reply #23 of 38)

It may call for butter flavor....but I just use the plain....don't want the artificial color either..LOL  Yes, this old dog learns new tricks all the time thanks to young pups like you!!

Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans

 

Plover's picture

(post #62554, reply #32 of 38)

"The baking powder helps out the flakiness. Like shortening, (or vinegar or egg) it's another trick to help make up for imperfect technique."

So what is the difference between a `trick` and a reliable recipe that gives good results for people who have limited interest in perfecting their technique.

CookiM0nster's picture

(post #62554, reply #33 of 38)

When it comes to pie crust, there is no recipe that will reliably give good results for people who have limited interest in perfecting their technique.

Pie crust is one of those things that depends almost entirely on technique to succeed. There are a few tricks, as I've mentioned, that make success easier, but it still isn't easy.

If you lack the motivation to learn the technique, I'd suggest not making pie, or sticking to other types of crusts like graham cracker.


Edited 11/25/2007 12:28 am by CookiM0nster

Biscuit's picture

(post #62554, reply #34 of 38)

ITA.  My own experience with pie pastry changed DRAMATICALLY when I finally perfected technique. 


Same thing with biscuits - my biscuits were like hockey pucks until I realized what my mother did that made them soft and fluffy.  As soon as I learned it wasn't the recipe, but the technique, my biscuit-making life changed forever! (G)



"Maybe Christmas doesn't come from a store.  Maybe Chrismas...perhaps...means a little bit more!"  - The Grinch

"When a stupid man is doing something he is ashamed of, he always declares that it is his duty."  - George Bernard Shaw

susielynn's picture

(post #62554, reply #6 of 38)

I was so excited to get the apple pie recipe . I realized that the flaky pie pastry  was not listed in recipe and was another link. I can not get to that recipe. i would greathly appreciate a copy of that also. You are a life saver. Thanks again. Susielynn

schnitzel's picture

(post #62554, reply #7 of 38)

susielynn's picture

(post #62554, reply #8 of 38)

You came to my rescue. Thank you so very much. Everything is copied and ready to go.

schnitzel's picture

(post #62554, reply #9 of 38)

Yea! Glad that worked for you.


susielynn's picture

(post #62554, reply #35 of 38)

I made the apple pie for Thanksgiving..it is THE BEST. My son was thrilled and we circled the last piece like vultures.Please try it and see what you think.


Thanks again.

ashleyd's picture

(post #62554, reply #13 of 38)

OK, this is not the requested recipe, but it came from a recent TV series called Britain's Best Dish, and it received high praise from the judges and from my DSIL, no mean baker, who declared it the "best apple pie ever".


Bramley apple crump with vanilla custard (Janet Jones)



INGREDIENTS

• 100 g butter, at room temperature
• 100g sugar, granulated
• 4 heaped tablespoons organic plain flour
• 450 g Bramley apples

CUSTARD
• 300 ml full cream milk
• 30 ml single cream
• 1 vanilla pod
• 2 egg yolks at room temperature
• 1 tablespoon soft light brown sugar
• 1 teaspoon corn flour

PRE-HEAT THE OVEN TO 170 DEGREES CELSIUS

METHOD
1. For the crump topping, place the flour into an oven proof bowl and add the sugar and butter.
2. Transfer the bowl to the oven for 10-15 minutes until the butter has melted
3. For the filling, peel, core and slice apples, place in another ovenproof dish and put in oven for 5 minutes.
4. Remove the crump mixture from oven and stir the ingredients together and spread over the part cooked apples.
5. Place in oven at 170 degrees Celsius for 40 minutes.
6. For the custard, put the milk, cream and vanilla pod into small pan and bring to boil. Remove from heat, remove vanilla pod then add the sugar and stir for 30 seconds.
7. Add the corn flour to yolks. Whisking the egg yolk mixture continually, slowly add the vanilla, milk and cream mixture.
8. Pour the custard into a heat proof bowl, place over a bowl of boiling water, stirring with a spoon until it has thickened. Remove from heat and pour in jug.
9. Serve a spoonful of apple crump in a bowl and pour over the custard.


 



Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Lee's picture

(post #62554, reply #16 of 38)

Too bad we don't get Bramley apples here.  I have fond memories of a blackberry and Bramley apple crumble that I enjoyed in London.  The flavor and texure are different from anything other apple I've had.

ashleyd's picture

(post #62554, reply #17 of 38)

When I'd posted that I had a thought that Bramleys might not be available, but a sharp cooking apple should work reasonably well. Apparently it's the crump which is successful, you could probably wing it on the filling.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Lee's picture

(post #62554, reply #20 of 38)

There are many lovely varieties of tart cooking apples available, but my recollection is that I thought the Bramleys were exceptional.  I must add, however, that I'm an enthusiastic audience for local dishes and foodstuffs when I travel.

Jean's picture

(post #62554, reply #18 of 38)

This sounds like a Dutch apple pie without the bottom crust?? Then topped with custard ?? I'd love to see a photo of it. Does the custard go on top or on the bottom?  I don't always understand English. :)


Well I found one by googling. Not that it helped much.


 


 




Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 11/2/2007 2:56 pm ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
Lee's picture

(post #62554, reply #21 of 38)

It sounds like the baked apples and topping go into a serving bowl and the custard is poured around and over the top in lieu of ice cream.  Sounds warm and homey and very English.  :^).

ashleyd's picture

(post #62554, reply #22 of 38)

The only picture is the way it was presented for the competition, which was artful streaks of custard around the crump, but the normal English way is to put the pie in the bowl and pour custard over it (or round it if you want to preserve the crispiness of the topping).


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Jean's picture

(post #62554, reply #24 of 38)

Oh, yes, crisp is good!


Now I have to try to decipher the measurements. Heh.




Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 11/3/2007 12:11 am ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ashleyd's picture

(post #62554, reply #25 of 38)

I finally got around to making this and er, it's strange. I didn't have Bramleys so I used Granny Smith apples with a dash of lemon juice, and didn't make the custard, just served it with a spoon or two of heavy cream.  After warming the topping comes out like a sort of paste, almost like wet sand, but I spread it over the top and of the apples and cooked it. It took probably closer to 50 minutes and came out like a very thin crisp over the apples and was absolutely delicious, very light and full of flavour. For something quick and different this is definitely worth a try.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Jean's picture

(post #62554, reply #26 of 38)

Thanks for the report. I'll have to put apples on my  grocery list and give it a whirl later this week. What made you decide against the custard?



Birthdays are good for you. The more you have, the longer you live.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/


Edited 11/11/2007 8:17 pm ET by Jean

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
ashleyd's picture

(post #62554, reply #27 of 38)

Time really, and I know what good custard tastes like, the crump was new territory.


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62554, reply #28 of 38)

Would you say that Grannies plus lemon juice are a good sub for the Bramleys? I have a few recipes with Bramleys and I have never (knowingly) tasted one.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

ashleyd's picture

(post #62554, reply #29 of 38)

Pretty much, the taste is close and they hold together reasonably well. Although we tend to use Bramleys as default cooker, a Grannie will do if we don't have any in, especially for apple sauce. 


Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Risottogirl's picture

(post #62554, reply #30 of 38)

Thanks!


Another random question...what is the point of "bread sauce" ?


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay