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Bread Dough - Kitchenaid

dixie_'s picture

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The instructions that came with my Kitchenaid said to mix ingredients for dough 2 minutes until it clings to dough hook, then 2 minutes more until smooth & elastic. This doesn't seem very long to me - my bread machine kneads dough about 15-20 minutes.

angrychef's picture

(post #58267, reply #1 of 38)

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General guideline I follow is 1 min. low speed to bring all the ingredients together, then 5-10 min. on medium speed to knead the dough and develop the gluten. When you hear the dough slapping against the side of the bowl(this should happen during the last couple minutes), the dough is usually ready. Pull a little piece and see if it stretches easily without breaking. If you can stretch the piece of dough into a thin membrane, this means the dough is ready. Hope this helps.

dixie_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #2 of 38)

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Thanks, it does help and I have noted this info in my instruction booklet. My instructions were to knead on speed "2".

James's picture

(post #58267, reply #3 of 38)

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It depends on what you are making. If your making pain ordinare or the like you will need to knead it 8-10 minutes on the low setting. For "French" type breads 7-8 mins is the minimum that I use.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #4 of 38)

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I do it for longer too, but I usually go by feel.

Grasshopper_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #5 of 38)

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Speaking of "kneading" dough in a Kitchenaid, I did that for the first time ever today at school. I don't even own a Kitchenaid (yet) so it was fun. I started out low until I got everything incorporated; the first loaf I didn't start out on low and blew my flour, etc., hither and yon. Then when all my yeast was incorporated, I finished on the highest speed. All in all, it was only kneading for a couple mins., possibly 3. This was for focaccia...

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #6 of 38)

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My KA instruction book says there are two types of bread hooks-one needs twice as long as the other (there's a picture in the manual). I used to get so confused at the range of times for similar recipes for "heavy-duty mixers" until I read that. Now I just follow the KA instructions for my mixer.

PS Great visual, Grasshopper. I suspect most of us learned that lesson the hard way!

Wolverine's picture

(post #58267, reply #7 of 38)

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ML - you have the newest version, the 6 qt, don't you? It supposedly has that "soft start" feature that will prevent the cocoa powder blush I sometimes wear, if it works. So - does it work? ;-)

Cooking_Monster's picture

(post #58267, reply #8 of 38)

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i that will prevent the cocoa powder blush I sometimes wear

aah, I see we use the same brand of make-up.

Grasshopper_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #9 of 38)

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Hmmm, maybe I should put cocoa powder in my focaccia...

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #10 of 38)

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No, I have "the little one" (4 1/2 qt). That soft start sounds like a BIG improvement, though. I, too, make some serious messes.

Andi_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #11 of 38)

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A word of caution when mixing heavy dough in the Kitchenaid - don't add all the flour at once. I blew out a part on mine. The guy at the repair shop said he's seen alot of them come in ever since the MS cookbook.

Neo_Phyte's picture

(post #58267, reply #12 of 38)

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I got the new 6qt KA mixer a week ago as a gift - my first stand mixer. I have made many loaves of bread since then to compare with hand kneading, mostly focaccia. I added most of the flour all at once, and worked in the last flour gradually just like I would by hand. The soft start worked great, with no flour tornado. I left the shield off. I added the remaining flour as the dough worked, which let me get the moisture right. I have also experimented with kneading more or less, and adjusting the yeast. I found by kneading more and adding less yeast, I could get a finer consistency than I could by hand. I wound up kneading on the machine between five and ten minutes, which is what I would do by hand, but the machine was more efficient. I was very skeptical in advance that the mixer would be worth the trouble for small batches, but now I'm a total convert.

Mug's picture

(post #58267, reply #13 of 38)

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I have had my Kitchen aid for about 10 years now and just love it! It came with a whisk, a bread hook and a paddle shaped beater. I start my liquid ingredients with 2 cups of the flour using the paddle and mix on medium for 2 minutes. This is supposed to allow the gluten to develop ( sorry, don't remember who said this).

Now, I remove the paddle shaped beater and replace it with the dough hook. Then I gradually add the remaining flour about 1/2 cup at a time. Let knead another 6 - 8 minutes and then I turn it out and finish it by hand.

I like the method of greasing my hands and counter top with "shortening" while I finish the kneading so I don't have to keep adding flour. Betsy Oppenheimer was featured on "Cooking Live" and this was her tip. I'd love to pick up her book.. she seemed to know what she was talking about. She was so enthused about bread baking!

Grasshopper_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #14 of 38)

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i I got the new 6qt KA mixer a week ago as a gift

Boy you must be worth alot to get a KA as a gift; they're pricey.

dixie_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #15 of 38)

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Mug, I also saw Betsy Oppenheimer on this show and I was impressed as well with the fact that she used oil on the board rather than incorporating more flour. She has a web-site (which contributes nothing unless you want to order something). I think it is breadworksinc.com. or something like that. I was very disappointed with the site.

BTW, I have your eggless chocolate mousse recipe that you posted last December (only reason I remember date is that is printed on my recipe) on file, have made it and we all loved it.

Cissy_'s picture

(post #58267, reply #16 of 38)

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Lucky you with the six-quart KA and thanks for the tips. It will be Christmas stollen time here soon and your advice is appreciated.

SandraM's picture

(post #58267, reply #17 of 38)

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Cissy, I don't suppose you have a stollen recipe to share,do you? I love stollen, and am about to start Christmas baking this weekend (fruit cakes for those who don't gag at the thought.)

Cooking_Monster's picture

(post #58267, reply #18 of 38)

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Yes, please post your recipe cissy!

Pennsylvania baker's picture

(post #58267, reply #19 of 38)

My mother used to beat the dough in the soft stage at least 200 strokes.  She learned that from a peasant women some 60 years ago and it always works.  I even read somewhere recently:  beat 200 strokes by hand or 2 minutes after the dough forms a ball on the hook.  Your instructions are probably right on.

ashleyd's picture

(post #58267, reply #20 of 38)

As a newbie (welcome!) you may not be aware that the post you replied to is 6 years old.


Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was.

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

Pennsylvania baker's picture

(post #58267, reply #21 of 38)

Oh how embarrasing.  Sorry.

Gretchen's picture

(post #58267, reply #22 of 38)

You were nice enough to reply. That is all that matters. Welcome. You have obviously been busy reading!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
Ricks503's picture

(post #58267, reply #23 of 38)

And it nice to have some of these old discussions brought up again and revisited.

 


 


" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

SallyBR1's picture

(post #58267, reply #26 of 38)

I agree - I love when these flashback threads pop up

sometimes they bring posts by folks that are not around anymore, and it's nice to "read" them. TXgal is one I miss quite a bit, gone gone gone without even saying why...

Oh, well

 


 


"Sally who? Sally in the corner"
(Amy, November 2006)

Jean's picture

(post #58267, reply #28 of 38)

I'm pretty sure she got sick of all the political ranting.



They told me I was gullible and I believed them.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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SallyBR1's picture

(post #58267, reply #29 of 38)

That was it????

TOo bad. I think that in that case people should just ignore political posts - this site has so much to offer!

Well, come to think of it, she' s probably saving a lot of money being away of the "nasty enablers"

 


 


"Sally who? Sally in the corner"
(Amy, November 2006)

Gretchen's picture

(post #58267, reply #30 of 38)

I ignore them. Sometimes it is just so tiresome however. Over and over.

Gretchen

Gretchen
SallyBR1's picture

(post #58267, reply #33 of 38)

Ok, but just don t go putting me on your ignore me because I am always bringing NYT editorials to our virtual dinner table.. :-)

 


 


"Sally who? Sally in the corner"
(Amy, November 2006)

marie-louise's picture

(post #58267, reply #34 of 38)

If you don't want to see the political threads, the secret is just not to scan all the way down to IPKE. And use the "ignore this thread" feature when a cooking thread takes a detour.

Adele's picture

(post #58267, reply #35 of 38)

Also, usually you can tell by the heading of the thread in IPKE if it is political.  I'd hate to miss all the other good threads by not looking at IPKE at all.

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!

But, but, it's SUPPOSED to taste like that!