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Black Bean Hummus

CLS's picture

Black Bean Hummus (post #62280)

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I got involved in a cooking discussion on Ipke, so I'm moving it here. Splinter, here's the recipe I told you I'd post for you.

For everyone else, this is a great vegetarian/vegan recipe. I use it as a dip, but DH spreads it into pita pockets just like he does hummus. It sounds odd, it even looks a bit odd, but it's one of my most requested recipes, even by carnivores. Best made a day in advance and refrigerated overnight to let all the flavors come together. Max likes this, too.

b Black Bean Hummus

8 oz. dried black beans, soaked overnight and cooked in fresh water until tender
5 lg. cloves garlic (more or less to taste)
2 jalapenos, stemmed and seeded
1/3 c. FRESH lime juice
1/2 c. smooth peanut butter (fresh ground or low-sugar)
1/2 to 3/4 c. water
1/2 c. minced cilantro
salt to taste

Drain and rinse the beans. Let cool to room temperature. Put the garlic and jalapeno in the food processor. Process briefly to mince. Add the peanut butter and lime juice - process to a smooth paste. Add the beans and process until the mixture is very smooth, thinning to spreading consistency with water while processing. Add the cilantro and salt, pulsing just to combine.

Transfer to a serving bowl. Serve at room temperature with pita wedges.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #1 of 26)

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OK thanks CLS this does sound weird but I'm gonna try it--it's righ up someones alley here. I thought I had everything on hand (was going to use canned beans) but I don't have black beans, only chick peas, so I'm going to use that. How about adding some southwest seasoning?

chiqui_new_orleans's picture

(post #62280, reply #2 of 26)

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CLS!! I can't believe you posted this today!! I was looking in my pantry this morning eyeing two cans of black beans wondering what they would taste like if prepared in hummus fashion!!!!!! Thanks, I'm gonna try this. I adore Hummus!!!!
I am just kind of leary about the peanut butter??????Sounds weird!!

kai_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #3 of 26)

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Sounds good, CLS. Ever subbed the PB w/say, tahini?

How cool that Max likes jalapenos, or the flavor they impart. You did list them twice, right?

CLS's picture

(post #62280, reply #4 of 26)

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CORRECTION!!!! The jalapenos should NOT be listed twice! Ignore the 2nd listing of jalapenos! Thanks.

Yes, everyone, it is weird, but wonderful. Another case of the whole being very different than the individual parts.

* I don't think it would be the same with tahini. In fact, it wouldn't, so I don't recommend it. I swear, you cannot taste the PB, as long as you use fresh PB or low sugar. FHS, don't use Jiff or the kind you would use on sandwiches. I buy the unsweetened kind you get at healthfood stores. Anyway, you won't taste PB, I promise. If you did, it really would be weird.

* Fresh lime juice is a must. It doesn't taste right without it, so please don't sub bottled or concentrated or whatever. There's something about the fresh taste of fresh lime juice that just completes this dip.

* DO NOT leave out the jalapenos. It tastes flat. The dip isn't spicy, so you could probably add a few more. But if you leave them out you will notice it tasting very flat. So please don't.

* DO NOT leave out the cilantro and sub parsley or something. Once again, it will not taste right, it will taste flat. Even DH, who hates cilantro, agrees that you need it in this dip. Parsley won't do it.

* Do not leave out the garlic. As a matter of fact, The only thing I think you could get away with subbing in this is the black beans, although I'm not sure, I've never tried it. I'd like to know if someone does and it comes out right. But, personally, I don't vary this recipe at all, except how much garlic I add. As everyone knows, I like garlic, so depending on my mood I add a lot or a little.

CLS's picture

(post #62280, reply #5 of 26)

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Li, I don't suppose you could go in and take out that second listing of jalapeno, could you? Thanks!

kai_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #6 of 26)

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Thanks CLS! As long as I can't taste the PB, I know I'll love it. Wouldn't dare sub anything else except if I ground salted peanuts, maybe I wouldn't salt. No point in subbing the beans it seems.

splintergroupie_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #7 of 26)

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Now, perhaps this is a faux pas, but what about garlic-in-a-jar? Peeling garlic cloves and sewing on buttons are right at the bottom of leisure time activities for me.

kai_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #8 of 26)

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SG, no faux pas at all I expect, although I've never tried garlic in a jar.

Peeling fresh garlic can be a drag, and there are several "tools" out there to help, but all you need to do is whack the cloves w/the flat side of a big knife and the skin comes off. Then chop, dice, or smash away.

If you want a milder garlic flavor, roast the entire bulb w/all its cloves, and you can just squeeze it out of the tops.

Jean_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #9 of 26)

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Shhhh, don't tell, but I've been known to use it. DH is not a big garlic lover and the stuff keeps well in the fridge.

CLS's picture

(post #62280, reply #10 of 26)

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I buy pre-peeled garlic. Why not? When I use it as much as I do, it has no chance to degrade. My supermarket sells little paks of peeled garlic cloves - I buy them all the time. As long as it's fresh garlic, and not dried, granulated or processed in some disgusting manner, it's fine.

splintergroupie_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #11 of 26)

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Great! I buy the stuff in the Costco-sized jars preserved in oil. I go through a jar in about three weeks bec the mutts just love the stuff, too.

Roated garlic is the bee's knees, but i have one hour after enjoying it before i require solitary confinement.

angelina_cookalina's picture

(post #62280, reply #12 of 26)

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Here's my favorite Hummus. I usually omit the checca and just make the hummus. I serve it with wedges of lemon, warm pita bread in triangles and sometimes the vegetables listed below. yum yum.

I look forward to trying your hummus, CLS. It looks fab.

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Makes 8 to 10 servings

"Yummus" is how Hayley Ohman, a counter server at the CPK in Irvine, California, describes this appetizer to her customers. What makes this version uniquely Italian is its use of white beans in place of the garbanzo beans of traditional Middle Eastern recipes. For those who might enjoy an extra-Zesty flavor, accompany the dip with lemon wedges to squeeze-a suggestion that Adam Hoffman, a host at the CPK in Tarzana, California, likes to make to his customers. Vegetables, such as the cherry tomatoes shown, are also good for dipping.

8 TO 10 MEDIUM CLOVES GARLIC

3 CUPS DRAINED CANNED CANNELLINI BEANS OR GREAT NORTHERN BEANS
(ABOUT TWO 15-OUNCE CANS) (SEE NOTE)

1/2 CUP SESAME PASTE (TAHINI)

6 TABLESPOONS EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

1/4 CUP FRESHLY SQUEEZED LEMON JUICE

1 TABLESPOON PLUS 1/2 TEASPOON SOY SAUCE

1 1/2 TEASPOONS SALT

1 1/2 TEASPOONS GROUND CUMIN

1/8 TEASPOON GROUND CORIANDER

1/2 TEASPOON CAYENNE PEPPER

1/4 TO 1/2 CUP COLD WATER (IF NEEDED)

8 GOOD-QUALITY PITA BREADS

1 RECIPE CHECCA (below)

2 TABLESPOONS MINCED FRESH ITALIAN PARSLEY

1. Fit a food processor with the steel blade. Process the garlic cloves until finely minced, stopping the processor occasionally to scrape down the sides of the work bowl.
2. Add the beans and pulse the machine a few times to chop them coarsely. Then, with the machine
running, puree them while you slowly pour the sesame paste through the feed tube. Still with the motor running, pour the olive oil, lemon juice, and soy sauce through the feed tube, stopping the processor occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl.

3.Stop the processor, open the lid, and add the salt, cumin, coriander, and cayenne. Process until thoroughly blended. If the puree seems too thick for dipping or spreading, pulse in the 1/4 to 1/2 cup cold water.
Transfer the puree to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate to chill well before serving.

4.Preheat the oven to 2500F. Put the pita breads in the oven and heat until thoroughly warmed, 6 to 8 minutes. Carefully remove and cut into wedges.

5.Place the chilled hummus in a serving plate or bowl and arrange the tomato Checca on top. Garnish with the chopped parsley and surround with the pita triangles. Serve immediately.

Note: To cook the beans from scratch, carefully sort through 1 1/2 cups dried cannellini or great northern beans, discarding any stones, debris, or discolored or misshapen beans. Rinse the beans under cold running water. Put them in a large bowl, add 6 cups cold water, and leave to soak overnight. Drain the beans, place them in a pot, cover with 6 cups more cold water, and bring to boil over high heat, skimming the surface of any foam. Continue to boil them hard for ten minutes. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, covered, for about 45 minutes or until very tender. Drain the beans and rinse under cold water until completely cool to the touch. Measure out 3 cups and proceed with the above recipe, reserving any remaining beans for another use.

Main Course Hummus Variations
Although Tuscan Hummus is traditionally served as an appetizer, it also makes a terrific light main course. Turn the dip into a satisfying vegetarian dish by topping it with corn kernels, black beans, shredded carrots, sun dried tomatoes, spinach, shredded jicama, and chopped red onion.

Checca
2 lbs roma (plum) tomatoes cut into ½ inch dice
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced fresh basil
2 teaspoons salt
½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Toss ingredients together thoroughly, cover with plasitic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Source: CPK, Pastas, Salads, Soups and Sides

Li_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #13 of 26)

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No problem. Also, I changed steemed to stemmed. (I am assuming that you're not steaming your chiles?)

splintergroupie_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #14 of 26)

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I'm glad you clarified that. When i saved it to my hard drive, i modified the quantity and "steamed" them. Back to edit...

StevenHB_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #15 of 26)

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i 4.Preheat the oven to 2500F

If your oven ever gets to 2500F you're going to have a big problem ; )

Seriously, this looks good. I'll have to try it.

angelina_cookalina's picture

(post #62280, reply #16 of 26)

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i 2500
Yikes!

Sorry.
I hope you like it.. I really do.
I've served it a lot to visitors and always get compliments.

CLS-
Do you ever sub canned black beans? Does it compromise the final outcome?

CLS's picture

(post #62280, reply #17 of 26)

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You can substitute canned black beans, but rinse them really well, then weigh them to make sure you have enough.

angelina_cookalina's picture

(post #62280, reply #18 of 26)

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I'll be making it tomorrow. DO you know if the hummus is better when made with the dried beans?

CLS's picture

(post #62280, reply #19 of 26)

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I think so, but - I'm a food snob! I'm really not sure if you can tell the difference. I just don't buy canned anything except tomatoes so I always use dry.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #20 of 26)

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Canned beans are a good and handy food product, but if you start to bother to make you own from dried, you will notice the improvement. Unless you are like my roommates, who just hoover up any old thing you put on a plate.

I have to say the thought of putting soy sauce in Hummus makes me cringe. Hummus is a dish that does benefit from your own cooked beans, and I think needs to be kept pure to be best. Like guacomole, where some peeps try to put in gross crass things like spices. I can't even believe that they sell 'guac dip' in a package that you are supposed to mix in? What is that?

That said, I am a big fan of a tofu hummus. Go figure.

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #62280, reply #21 of 26)

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We make both a chickpea and black bean version at work. The black bean one is nasty looking. It doesn't taste bad, but it sure looks like something you don't want to eat. It is not like your recipe - more like a black bean version of the regular hummus.

I love hummus and have made it many times with both dried chickpeas and canned. I have to say that this is one time where I prefer to use the canned.

Mer1's picture

(post #62280, reply #22 of 26)

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i I am a big fan of a tofu hummus.

Nutcakes, would you give me your recipe? TIA.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #62280, reply #23 of 26)

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I use this one, but usually use tahini instead of some/all of the olive oil. I also add garlic. Silken tofu gives it a beautiful smooth texture. This makes a great lo-cal lunch with a varitey of cut veggies: celery, carrot, jicima sticks, radish, cucumber.

angelina_cookalina's picture

(post #62280, reply #24 of 26)

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Soy sauce...

I know, but its good. The restaurant that this recipe came from specializes in blending different ethnic cuisines, (fusion cooking, I think its called?) so I think thats where the addition of soy sauce to hummus came from.

Mer1's picture

(post #62280, reply #25 of 26)

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oh... That does look like a good recipe. I especially like the idea of adding a bulb of roasted garlic and/or roasted red pepper. Thanks! My DH is in a phase now where he is eating a lot of hummus for snacks when he comes home and I am concerned about the fat levels. We also are looking for ways to incorporate tofu if we can.. Thanks!

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #62280, reply #26 of 26)

Thanks to whoever angelina cookalina is...


I just made this for an appetizer and it is really good.  I am just doing the hummus and the checca. 


 I am making curry tonight and both dishes have some of the same spices, but I don't care.  I also am going to saute the rest of the Swiss chard as a side and have a salad.  DH is bringing home dessert


Oh so yummy for a cold night!




 Makes 8 to 10 servings

"Yummus" is how Hayley Ohman, a counter server at the CPK in Irvine, California, describes this appetizer to her customers. What makes this version uniquely Italian is its use of white beans in place of the garbanzo beans of traditional Middle Eastern recipes. For those who might enjoy an extra-Zesty flavor, accompany the dip with lemon wedges to squeeze-a suggestion that Adam Hoffman, a host at the CPK in Tarzana, California, likes to make to his customers. Vegetables, such as the cherry tomatoes shown, are also good for dipping.

8 TO 10 MEDIUM CLOVES GARLIC

3 CUPS DRAINED CANNED CANNELLINI BEANS OR GREAT NORTHERN BEANS
(ABOUT TWO 15-OUNCE CANS) (SEE NOTE)

1/2 CUP SESAME PASTE (TAHINI)

6 TABLESPOONS EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

1/4 CUP FRESHLY SQUEEZED LEMON JUICE

1 TABLESPOON PLUS 1/2 TEASPOON SOY SAUCE

1 1/2 TEASPOONS SALT

1 1/2 TEASPOONS GROUND CUMIN

1/8 TEASPOON GROUND CORIANDER

1/2 TEASPOON CAYENNE PEPPER

1/4 TO 1/2 CUP COLD WATER (IF NEEDED)

8 GOOD-QUALITY PITA BREADS

1 RECIPE CHECCA (below)

2 TABLESPOONS MINCED FRESH ITALIAN PARSLEY

1. Fit a food processor with the steel blade. Process the garlic cloves until finely minced, stopping the processor occasionally to scrape down the sides of the work bowl.
2. Add the beans and pulse the machine a few times to chop them coarsely. Then, with the machine
running, puree them while you slowly pour the sesame paste through the feed tube. Still with the motor running, pour the olive oil, lemon juice, and soy sauce through the feed tube, stopping the processor occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl.

3.Stop the processor, open the lid, and add the salt, cumin, coriander, and cayenne. Process until thoroughly blended. If the puree seems too thick for dipping or spreading, pulse in the 1/4 to 1/2 cup cold water.
Transfer the puree to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate to chill well before serving.

4.Preheat the oven to 2500F. Put the pita breads in the oven and heat until thoroughly warmed, 6 to 8 minutes. Carefully remove and cut into wedges.

5.Place the chilled hummus in a serving plate or bowl and arrange the tomato Checca on top. Garnish with the chopped parsley and surround with the pita triangles. Serve immediately.

Note: To cook the beans from scratch, carefully sort through 1 1/2 cups dried cannellini or great northern beans, discarding any stones, debris, or discolored or misshapen beans. Rinse the beans under cold running water. Put them in a large bowl, add 6 cups cold water, and leave to soak overnight. Drain the beans, place them in a pot, cover with 6 cups more cold water, and bring to boil over high heat, skimming the surface of any foam. Continue to boil them hard for ten minutes. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, covered, for about 45 minutes or until very tender. Drain the beans and rinse under cold water until completely cool to the touch. Measure out 3 cups and proceed with the above recipe, reserving any remaining beans for another use.

Main Course Hummus Variations
Although Tuscan Hummus is traditionally served as an appetizer, it also makes a terrific light main course. Turn the dip into a satisfying vegetarian dish by topping it with corn kernels, black beans, shredded carrots, sun dried tomatoes, spinach, shredded jicama, and chopped red onion.

Checca
2 lbs roma (plum) tomatoes cut into ½ inch dice
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced fresh basil
2 teaspoons salt
½ cup extra virgin olive oil

Toss ingredients together thoroughly, cover with plasitic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Source: CPK, Pastas, Salads, Soups and Sides



Edited 2/29/2008 11:59 am ET by ICDOCEAN1


Edited 2/29/2008 2:38 pm ET by ICDOCEAN1