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Anyone made Beef Caronnade?

nutcakes_'s picture

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Maybe no one is around to help me now but here goes. I had 3 pounds of beef stew meat and no red wine so I decided to make Carbonnade ala Flamande, since I have a bottle of dark beer. I thought the onions were carmelized, but no. The NY Times and epicurious recipes are similar, but for the first you saute until tender but not brwon, and the second is for golden brown. I have 2 to 2 1/2 quarts of onion to 3 pounds of beef stew meat so the onion is still cooking away.

My recipe is simple: just beef dredged in flour, onion, garlic, beer, meat broth, thyme, bay leaf parsley. When I did a search I found recipes, many in French, that have vinegar. Also some that have mustard. This sounds a little more interesting, but I can't quite translate them. Any ideas appreciated.

mangia!'s picture

(post #58394, reply #1 of 37)

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Hi nutcakes! There you go with another culinary adventure. You are truly inspiring! I have not made this myself, but I found a recipe for you in "La Cuisine de France" by Mapie, the Countess de Toulousse-Lautrec, edited and translated by Charlotte Turgeon.(Had a feeling it might be in that one).


BEEF CARBONNADES MONTEYNARD

FOR SIX PEOPLE
*2 pounds individual beef steaks
*3/4 cup lard
*4-5 onions
*1 1/2 teaspoons mixed powdered herbs
*6 ounces beer
*3/4 cup bouillon
*1 large slab French bread
*French mustard
*Salt & pepper

Order individual steaks that are small but fairly thick (1/2 to 3/4 inch), cut from the eye of the round, weighing about 1/4 pound each. Heat 4 tablespoons of the lard in a skillet and sear the steaks on both sides without letting them cook. Set the steaks aside and pour off the lard, wiping the skillet clean.

Melt the rest of the lard in the skillet and saute the onions, sliced thin, over a moderate heat, letting them turn yellow but not allowing them to brown.

In the bottom of a heavy deep pan or earthenware casserole, place half the onions and cover with the steaks. Spread the rest of the onions over the meat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and a mixture of powdered herbs. This can be a commercially prepared mixture or one of your own making, using powdered thyme, bay leaf, tarragon, fennel, sage, and so on. No one herb should dominate. Pour the beer and bouillon over the onions. Cover everything with a large slab of bread spread generously on both sides with mustard. Cover the pan or casserole tightly and cook at 275' F. in the oven or simmer very slowly on top of the stove for 4 hours.

Arrange the meat and onions on a heated platter. Pour the sauce through a sieve lined with a dish towel dampened in cold water. Reheat and serve separately, along with rice or boiled potatoes.

This dish is even better if made a day in advance and reheated. It makes a particularly fine dish if the cooked steaks are placed on an ovenproof platter, covered with flaky pastry, painted with egg yolk, covered with well-oiled brown paper, and baked 45 minutes at 300' F. Accompany with the vegetables.


















nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #2 of 37)

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Thank-you, the mustard and bread thing seemed like what some of the French websites said. I decided it would probably be best the next day anyway, so I cooked it for 1 1/2 hours and will reheat/finish tomorrow. Haven't decided about the mustard or vinegar yet. SO tasted it and loved it and told me not to add anything. Tons of gravy, does need to be thickened a bit and I think the bread would work perfectly (and I'll sneak some mustard on).

Oh hi Nancy H. Mangia!

mangia!'s picture

(post #58394, reply #3 of 37)

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Hi, nutcakes. Did you get my e-mail?

joiep's picture

(post #58394, reply #4 of 37)

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Nutcakes, this sounds like a wonderful dish. I prefer beef stew, type dishes to taste like "BEEF" and not vegetables. Also, I use Dijon mustard, often, in pan sauces, and it is the best.

Now, about the bread in this recipe. Is it suppose to cook into the gravy or form a crust?

mangia!'s picture

(post #58394, reply #5 of 37)

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joiep, I'm curious about what BRAND of dijon mustard you use. I have tried several, and there is an amazing difference among them. For that matter, please weigh in anyone else with your favorite. Such a thing can really change the taste of a recipe.

joiep's picture

(post #58394, reply #6 of 37)

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Nancy H. (mangia!), give me time to adjust. You're talking to a girl who grew up on "French's, so consider the source. I always have big jars of Grey Poupon in the cabinet and that is what I use for pan sauces, etc. I like Grey Poupon because it is not so spicey. I also have "Maille" brand that I use at Tropp's suggestion but, for me, it is awfully strong. Recently I purchased a Cajun mustard, "Zatarain's" brand. Haven't use it yet but tastes and smells wonderful.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #7 of 37)

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The bread should dissolve and thicken the liquid giving it some body. I have used this in other dishes, like Elizabeth David's Moules a la Bordeaise, which cook for a much shorter time and it works very well; the soft fresh bread crumbs melt into the wine and tomato based sauce.

joiep's picture

(post #58394, reply #8 of 37)

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Devine! Must try this.

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #9 of 37)

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If you think Maille is strong-try Moutarde de Dijon by Delouis fils! The black label looks a lot like Maille but it has a picture of the Eiffel Tower on the front. They sell it at Home Chef and other places-it was the Gold Medal Winner at a Napa Mustard Competition. BTW-you can also get Costco-sized jars of Maille. I have one but the label doesn't say where it's from. I also like that really strong French mustard that comes in the beige crock and the red plastic top-the one w/ the seeds. IMO, mustard should be as strong as wasabi!

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #10 of 37)

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Did you use 3/4 cup of lard?

mangia!'s picture

(post #58394, reply #11 of 37)

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Delouis fils is the one I had been using (introduced the same way as you, ML - by the way did you hear the rumor that Homechef is declaring bankruptcy?). Then I tried some Grey Poupon my sister had (which by the way I saw Julia Child use on one of her shows) and it was completely different. I've tried various "earthy" mustards, with many interesting tastes.(My family loves a garlic one from Oli..? winery) I'm curious now what qualifies something as "dijon" when they can be so very different - not just the flavored ones, but ones marked simply "dijon". To me, it isn't necessarily a matter of strength, just vast differences in taste. A vinaigrette or a mustard crusted or slathered item will have a completely different outcome depending on what you use. It is interesting to me that so many recipes will have a sentence like "use a goat cheese such as Montrechet", but none say "use a dijon mustard such as...." who is considered the standard?

Guess someone is going to have to have a Mustard Fair, so we can taste lots without having 30 million opened jars all over the house!

I just got a Tarragon dijon by Edmond Fallot from a litle shop in Half Moon Bay that I can't wait to try. Got it because a recipe I was going to try called for a green mustard, and of course now I can't remember where that recipe was!

Joiep, I picked up zatarains' creole mustard at Cost Plus last time I was there because of chiqui's and Big Daddy's posts. We really liked it! We're a small group, so can only have so many jars around at a time. Would love to hear everybody's favs by brand name...dijon and otherwise!

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #12 of 37)

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i did you hear the rumor that Homechef is declaring bankruptcy

That would make me very sad. My skill level is above her classes now and here store can be overpriced, but I have a real fondness for Judith Ets-Hokins. She taught me (and DH) how to cook at a time when no one else was doing techniques classes for home cooks. Besides, if you remember your SF history, she was married to a very rich developer (Jeremy Ets-Hokins) who got into some sort of financial/ legal troubles, then died. She created her first store in Pacific Heights as a way of supporting herself and her kids. I really admire her for that!

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #13 of 37)

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My recipe did not call for lard, just enough oil to brown the meat.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #14 of 37)

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That beige crock one, with the seeds....so good, is that Moutarde de Meaux?

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #15 of 37)

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I bought Creole Mustard for that great Green Onion Dressing BD posted. The brand is Maison Louisianne. I wonder which brand is best?

We also really like a Horseradish Mustard we bought recently (the bottle is already half way gone). It is from England, rhe village of Elsenham. Elsenham Tewkesbury Mustard with horseradish. It has a pure smooth horseradish taste. I have used it to put on salmon with a breadcrumb crust and it is great for roast beef sandwiches.

Jean_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #16 of 37)

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Wow thanks for bringing this up. Just checked the fridge and I'm down to only 3 basics--salad, dipping, and Koop's dijon (rather mild). Time to get adventurous at the specialty store next trip to big city.

Gretchen_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #17 of 37)

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Thought I might add my recipe for Hot 'n Sweet mustard

*1 container dry mustard (Colman's or the cheap stuff you buy at Walmart)
*1C vinegar (white distilled or cider)
*2 eggs
*3/4C sugar (white, but you can vary with brown)

Put the mustard and vinegar in the top of a double boiler and allow to sit for 2 hours to overnight.
Beat eggs and sugar together and add to vinegar/mustard.
Cook over simmering water for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Keep refrigerated.

Mix this half and half with honey for a good honey mustard.

As you can see this is a recipe you can play with. First ever had it served with cheese cubes for dipping. Is also good to spread on brie before encasing in phyllo and baking.

Jean_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #18 of 37)

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My version calls for 3 eggs and 1 cup sugar. Also thinning with some dry vermouth, 1 tsp at a time until proper consistancy for dipping. We use it for pretzels. Wonderful with beer and Pinochle.

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #19 of 37)

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Here are another set of proportions. I love this but never know how long it can be kept, with the eggs and all. Any ideas?

Sweet Hot Mustard

Recipe By : Nancy Hammel in Holiday Home Cooking

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 cup malt vinegar
1 can Coleman's dry mustard -- 4 ounces
1/2 cup sugar
6 eggs

In the top of a double boiler, add the vinegar to the mustard slowly, throughly beating the mustard to break up any lumps. Let sit 2 hours. Stir in the sugar, and add the eggs 1 at a time, beating the mixture after each addition. Place the pan over cold water and begin to cook. Stir with a whisk constantly until desired consistency is reached. When the water in the bottom of the double boiler begins to simmer, reduce heat. Take care to whisk the sides and bottom of the pan so you do not end up with scrambled eggs. When sauce is ready, in just a few minutes, pack into jars and refrigerate.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

NOTES : I used cider vinegar.

joiep's picture

(post #58394, reply #20 of 37)

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Now, I did not like the mustard in the beige crock with the red plastic lid. Can't tell you, now, what it was I did not like but just didn't.

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #21 of 37)

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It's very hot & has very big seeds. Not for everything. Also, that lid is very annoying to pry off-it takes brute strength. But I like it.

Adele_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #22 of 37)

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i bay leaf parsley

Never heard of this. What is it? (Or did you forget a comma? (LOL)

nutcakes_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #23 of 37)

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bay leaf, parsley.

kai_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #24 of 37)

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ML, I have one of those beige stoneware containers with a plastic red lid, but from TJs (Moutard de Dijon). Very mild, and no discernable seeds. It's a product of Dijon, France, and the ingredients are (no great surprise) Water, Mustard Seed, Vinegar, Wine, Salt, Citric Acid. French's (hot dog type) has more bite than this. Guess this is not at all similar to true Dijon or the one you referenced as being very hot and with seeds. The label says "The ingredients of real Dijon mustard are strictly regulated by more than 300 years of tradition: mustard seeds, white wine or wine vinegar, water and spices. TraderJoe's Dijon Mustard is made according to ancient methods, in traditional oak barrels, without perservatives, artificial colors or flavors." This stuff is mild, IMO. I do like the crock, however :)

joiep's picture

(post #58394, reply #25 of 37)

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I agree about the seeds but I don't remember it being Hot. It seemed almost vinegery and sweet, I think.

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #26 of 37)

sanderson_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #27 of 37)

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More mustard than anyone needs...

joiep's picture

(post #58394, reply #28 of 37)

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Marie, the crock and the label, from what I can see, look identical to the one I had. Maybe they make different flavored mustards.

Mine came in a gift basket at Christmas and I think the taste that I'm trying to describe is like a pickled relish? Does that make sense? Very seedy but not much of a mustard taste, as I can recall.

Wolverine's picture

(post #58394, reply #29 of 37)

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i Wonderful with beer and Pinochle.

Jean - we played pinochle every friday and saturday nite with my Dad when I was a kid. Pizza with tho - no beer. We were underage.
i Dad
had beer with his pizza! ;-) Ever play the cut throat version?

Jean_'s picture

(post #58394, reply #30 of 37)

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Which cutthroat version? We play one where the bidding must go up by increments of 5 after you hit 60, where 4 face cards of one suit scores the same for meld as doubles around, and you must make a minimum of 20 points in cards or you lose your meld. I think that is a local variation but it's fun.