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Acid in tomato sauce

John_J._Napoli's picture

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Any suggestions on how to take the acid out of tomato sauce (e.g. marinara sauce)? I've heard use sugar, baking soda, skim the foam off the pot,.. I just add sugar. Thanks. My stomach will thank you.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #1 of 26)

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Do
i not
use sugar. In the case of marinara, just don't overcook it. Once it is assembled, place it on low-medium heat. Once it deepens in color, it's done. The color change is obvious to the eye so you won't have to worry about not recognizing it. No self-respecting Italian would put sugar in their tomato sauce. It's a "short-cut" technique used by schlock pizzerias.

Marie-Louise_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #2 of 26)

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i It's a "short-cut" technique used by schlock pizzerias.

<<>>

and me...

I like it w/ sugar, even when I'm using great tomatoes. I taste it without it, I add a little sugar, I always like it better after the sugar. But I'm not Italian- I guess that's what happens when you grow up w/ Chef Boy-R-Dee.

PS I'm having some of your Italian Gravy for dinner tonight . Do I have to go stand in the corner if I tell you I slipped a little sugar in it?

MEAN_CHEF's picture

(post #60829, reply #3 of 26)

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The only way to take the acid out is to take the tomatoes out.

Cooking_Monster's picture

(post #60829, reply #4 of 26)

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Baking soda would neutralize the acid, but I can't imagine it would taste very good after that.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #5 of 26)

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BTW... I made marinara last night because most of our other cooking stuff is at the new restaurant. Basically, canned tomatoes are the only thing left here...LOL.

Someone had gifted me with a package of julienned sun dried tomatoes. I re-hydrated about 1/2 cup of the tomatoes in about 1/4 cup water in the nuke; plopped them in the blender, added 1 28 oz. can whole peeled tomatoes and pulsed. Daughter doesn't like big chunks of tomato in sauces so I blended it a little more than usual. In a small saucepan, I placed some olive oil and 2 cloves garlic. I added the tomato mixture and sprinkled with a little dry basil and salt. The sauce cooked for a total of 8 minutes. Then I shut it off. Re-warmed it a tiny bit after the pasta was done and it was very good.

The addition of sun dried tomatoes not only gave a more intense tomato flavor, but a welcome bit of texture, of which even daughter approved.

c (*) (*) (*)


Sometimes, people get used to a technique, even though it is superfluous. If anyone learned to add sugar when they first made tomato sauce, they're reluctant to give it up. I used to work with a woman who described the ingredients of her tomato sauce as follows: Tomato puree, a bay leaf and sugar. Cringe, combined with shudder. Egads.

CLS's picture

(post #60829, reply #6 of 26)

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Use better quality tomatoes. I can tell a distinct difference between different brands of canned tomatoes. If I'm not using fresh (and I rarely do because I eat them raw), I use Hunts Italian Style tomatoes. Never had to add sugar, salt or anything but olive oil, garlic and herbs.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #7 of 26)

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Any can labeled "San Marzano" contains superior tomatoes. Many brands sell San Marzano tomatoes, some are imported. CLS is right...choose a brand and stick with it - but don't count out the "store" brands. Believe me, there is
i no such thing
as a true "store" brand. The product is usually made by a reputable brand name and sold to the store chain with permission to change the label to the store label. Polly-O cheese is the one that comes to mind. Check out your next ricotta or mozzarella purchase. Pick up a package of Polly-O cheese (any of them) and look for the plant number. It's 36-8071. Pick up the store brand and if the plant number is 36-8071, it's Polly-O cheese for half the price.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #8 of 26)

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Mean's correct. The acid still exists whether it's sugared or not. The quality of the tomato makes a huge difference. Gently softened onion at the beginning to capitalize on the sugars there. Removing the seeds with a sieve or tomato strainer helps as well.

Michael_P.'s picture

(post #60829, reply #9 of 26)

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If aesthetics don't matter you could make the marinara using yellow tomatoes which are lower in acid. Unfortunately they sometimes are missing the intense flavor of a red tomato.

samchang_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #10 of 26)

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If you're going the home-made route, you can also use Brandywines, Cherokee Purples, Pineapple, or Japanese tomatoes. All are very flavorful and to me don't have the acidic bite that some tomatoes have. Since tomaotoes don't bother my GI system, I unfortunately cannot say whether they are low enough to prevent any stomach upset.

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #11 of 26)

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i ...Removing the seeds with a sieve or tomato strainer helps...

Oh duh...I
b can't
believe I forgot about removing the seeds!!! I'm so used to them, they don't cause me a problem but I know lots of people who strain them out complaining of bitterness. Good catch, Glenys.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #12 of 26)

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Chiff, I"m so used to making a quick "fresh tomato sauce" with canned Italian tomatoes, breaking them up and quickly reheating to bright red, trying to avoid really cooking those damn seeds. Last night we made the same tomato sauce but put the tomatoes through the traditional Italian tomato press. What nectar!!! My co-instructor is Neopolitan Quebecer- brought his press from home. For the class, his mom made gnocchi that were to die for. The sauce was perfect.

Jean_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #13 of 26)

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Did you put them through after cooking or before? Peeled or unpeeled?

Chiffonade_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #14 of 26)

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When I do fresh tomato sauce, I cut up the unpeeled tomatoes (discarding the little stem circle at the top), bring to a boil with fresh basil. Simmer for about 10 minutes, then put through a food mill. The food mill will remove the seeds and skins. I don't salt or pepper it because I expect to use it as an ingredient, much like you don't salt or pepper stocks because you may not know what the final product will be.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #15 of 26)

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We were using canned and put them through before cooking. The pap was saved for pizza. Gently heated a little onion in olive oil- must be translucent or it will firm again with the acid of the tomato- and then warmed the garlic. Add the strained tomato and just heat through. Tore the fresh basil in off the stove.

Glenys_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #16 of 26)

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Ditto

Jean_'s picture

(post #60829, reply #17 of 26)

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YUM

Lee's picture

(post #60829, reply #19 of 26)

I have a friend who is of Italian descent; she's a wonderful cook, as was her mom, BUT she adds baking soda to her tomato sauce.  I hate it when she serves anything with tomato sauce!  There's no way to avoid eating it, and I can't tell her what I really think, but I can taste it.  I don't know exactly what it does to the tomatoes, but it's not a good thing. 

MadMom's picture

(post #60829, reply #20 of 26)

Does anyone realize this question was asked over six years ago?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Lee's picture

(post #60829, reply #21 of 26)

LOL -- that's hilarious!  As for my post, never mind ...

MadMom's picture

(post #60829, reply #22 of 26)

I know - my first clue was when I thought "boy, chiff would have a fit" then read back in the thread and saw she had already replied...in 2000!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Gretchen's picture

(post #60829, reply #23 of 26)

I call that REAL spelunking!!  And putting soda in tomato sauce is AWful!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
chiffonade's picture

(post #60829, reply #24 of 26)

...My first clue was when I thought "boy, chiff would have a fit" then read back in the thread and saw she had already replied...in 2000!


ROFLMAO!  I think I need to have There is no sugar in tomato sauce on my headstone or no one will be able to find it.


How did this question get unearthed, anyway?


"You can ask for cheese on your linguini with clam sauce...Just don't do it in front of me."  Mario Batali

*You're a REAL person, eat REAL food."

Chiffonade

MadMom's picture

(post #60829, reply #25 of 26)

Some poor soul came here on her first visit, and on her first and only post, replied to a six year old question. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

blondee's picture

(post #60829, reply #18 of 26)

three ways:


 


add a raw carrot or two to the sauce and leave in till soft


or add some sugar or


add 1 1/2 teaspoons of baking soda to counter the acid...not too much tho

kokaneestarr's picture

A whole carrot and a stalk of (post #60829, reply #26 of 26)

A whole carrot and a stalk of celery!