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What's for Thanksgiving this year?

tcurda's picture

I hope this isn't too early to start a discussion on Thanksgiving dinner.

We're going to my DSIL (across the back yard from us) yet again for the traditional family TD dinner. My DBIL will make his braised/steamed dual turkeys (he calls it roasted, but it's really more of the former), bagged bread-cube dressing moistened with water, whipped potatoes with ranch dressing, canned french-style green bean casserole with canned mushroom soup and canned crispy onion topping, boiled-to-death cauliflower topped with American cheese slices (done early enough so that the cheese melts and becomes a slurry with the water that came out of the cauliflower), heated up frozen corn, bottled gravy, canned cranberry jelly, and Pillsbury Doughboy biscuits.

I'm going to break tradition and actually bring dessert, which will be the FC pumpkin/streusel tart, and I'm going to attempt Chiqui's carmel/apple pie (with a test-bake before-hand for practice).

DW and I will have a TD-style Sunday dinner either the week before or after, for both DDs and their SOs along with DMIL. I want to try a fresh turkey for the first time, and another first, I want to try Mean's apple brine on it. I'm researching dressings, and I'll make a pan gravy similar to the one in FC #74. The roasted Yukon Gold potatoes from FC awhile back might also be done; these always go over well here. For veggies I want to try Tracy's garlic sprouts, and another I'm still deciding on for those that absolutely don't like sprouts. A nice cranberry/orange relish, and maybe some home-made biscuits (and definitely home-made bread) will round things out.

I'm still working out what to have for before-hand, and for dessert.

Sorry for the long post... :-)

Tom aka tomcatt

Live today like there's no tomorrow.

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.


Tom aka tomcatt

Live today like there's no tomorrow.

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.
MEANCHEF's picture

(post #57240, reply #61 of 135)

This thanksgiving will be:


Maple brined turkey and gravy
traditional farce a la tapenade
green salad
twice baked potatoes with gruyerre and chives
pumpkin prailine pie



And of course jellied cranberry sauce out of a can - no lumps please

MEAN CHEF RECIPES


Edited 11/10/2005 6:06 pm by MEANCHEF

Risottogirl's picture

(post #57240, reply #64 of 135)

Where is the recipe for "traditional farce a la tapenade"? Not sure what category to look under in your recipe listing.

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #57240, reply #65 of 135)

http://recipecircus.com/recipes/MEANCHEF/VEGETABLES/FARCE_A_LA_TAPENADE_-_Turkey_Dressing.html


Unfortunately it doesn't fit any of the categories - I may have to make a new one since I had a hard time finding it also. LOL


Risottogirl's picture

(post #57240, reply #70 of 135)

That "farce" might just be the ticket - olives? mushrooms? It is calling my name. Thanks!


What type of black olives do you normally use?


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #57240, reply #71 of 135)

regular old Califonia black olives.


Risottogirl's picture

(post #57240, reply #74 of 135)

regular old Califonia black olives


really? the kind that was always on the relish tray? we used to pop one onto each finger. I could have eaten them by the can when I was a kid.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #57240, reply #75 of 135)

Jean's picture

(post #57240, reply #76 of 135)

I could have eaten them by the can when I was a kid.


DH still does, I wonder not when, but IF he'll ever grow up.


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wisekaren's picture

(post #57240, reply #77 of 135)

Today at WF they had samples of an entire TD dinner! It was all quite good. Turkey, gravy, cornbread-sausage-spinach stuffing, squash with candied pecans, cranberry-orange sauce (a little too orangey for my taste), and the yummiest pureed turnips with crispy roasted shallots. I think I might buy a container of their gravy "just in case." I have no reason to believe that mine won't turn out OK, but it would be a disaster if it failed for some reason, and theirs was good.
Karen

Wolvie's picture

(post #57240, reply #78 of 135)

your DH is not alone. ;-)


I really like these olives still. Of course, I like the oil cured kind, and a bunch of others, but - I always have these around.


At least it's not Dinty Moore!!


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #57240, reply #79 of 135)

I have never met an olive I didn't like.

Wolvie's picture

(post #57240, reply #80 of 135)

well now - this is info I will cherish. ;-0

If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

pamilyn's picture

(post #57240, reply #72 of 135)

Mean, since you don't stuff this in the bird do you add any additional stock or are the two eggs enough moisture? Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

MEANCHEF's picture

(post #57240, reply #73 of 135)

I like my dressing in the crispy side, so I don't add any stock.  But you can baste with drippings or add stock.  I even like to bake it uncovered the last 15 minutes

Wolvie's picture

(post #57240, reply #62 of 135)

thanks - it sounds good. I've put the recipe in my cookbook file. Now - I wait for rhubarb. :-)

If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #57240, reply #16 of 135)

I hear that there is a farm in Graham, NC.  Is that near Burlington?  Let me know how the turkey comes out. 

Wolvie's picture

(post #57240, reply #25 of 135)

the one I'm looking at is called Shady Grove Farms in Hurdle Mills.


Not sure if I'm going down or not - it may be right after TG. I should know this week.


If, 2 1/2 years in, you don't control the only road linking your military airport to your headquarters, you don't control much of anything


Lewis Simons

 

ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #57240, reply #26 of 135)

That might be the same one that I heard about.  I just took a peek and found another breeder closer to me.  There is one in Wilmington , 1 1/2 hours instead 2 1/2-3 hours away. 


Good to know about them, but I would have to order sight unseen...I hardly think that the children would consider it a nice outing to pick out their turkey for dinner!  Not quite the same as looking for a Christmas tree...


I will keep them in mind for our next turkey dinner.

tcurda's picture

(post #57240, reply #96 of 135)

Oooooh... cranberry/garlic chutney...

*off to do a quick search on this*

(edited to add I found your link to it)

Tom aka tomcatt

Live today like there's no tomorrow.

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.


Edited 11/14/2005 10:34 pm by tcurda


Tom aka tomcatt

Live today like there's no tomorrow.

Smile - People will wonder what you're up to.
Cissy's picture

(post #57240, reply #6 of 135)

I'm going to attempt Chiqui's carmel/apple pie (with a test-bake before-hand for practice).  There's one of your desserts.


You didn't mention stuffing -- baked outside of the brined bird.  Our stuffing has butter, walnuts, apples, dried cranberries, onion, celery, turkey stock and bread cubes, plus fresh sage.  Bake alongside the turkey, covered for the first half hour and uncovered for the second, if you like a little crunch on top.


How about a cheese board with fruit (pears, grapes) for an appetizer?  We go light on that end of the feast.

CHandGreeson's picture

(post #57240, reply #8 of 135)

Do you have a recipe for your stuffing? It sounds delicious!

Cissy's picture

(post #57240, reply #53 of 135)

Do you have a recipe for your dressing?  Yes, sort of.  I usually just throw it all together.  Of course, in posting my message, I left out one major ingredient:  pork sausage.  You could omit it, for sure.  If you do, you might want to add some salt, as the sausage contributes a lot of salt to the recipe.


Here you go:


1 lb. pork breakfast sausage (Jimmy Dean or equivalent)


1 stick (1/2 cup) unsalted butter


1 large onion, chopped finely (a cup and a half to two cups)


2-4 ribs celery, cut into dice (slice celery lengthwise, then into dice) (about a cup)


½ (one half) cup walnuts, chopped


2 red-skinned apples, diced (leave skin on)


½ (one half) cup “Craisins” (dried cranberries)


1 bag stuffing cubes, unseasoned, or 8-10 cups bread cubes, lightly toasted


10-15 fresh sage leaves, chiffonade cut


1-2 cups homemade turkey stock, or 1 14 oz can low sodium chicken stock


 


In a large pot, cook breakfast sausage, breaking up with a spoon, until very lightly browned.  Drain fat and discard.  Reserve sausage.


 


Melt butter in same pot.  Add onion and celery and sauté until translucent.


 


Add all remaining ingredients except for stock and mix well with hands.  Add one cup of stock and mix lightly.  Mixture should not be too wet.  If it seems too dry, add more stock, a little at a time.  (Sorry I can’t be more specific about the wetness; the amount of stock added depends on how dry the bread cubes are.)


 


Stuffing can be done inside the turkey (it will be dense) or outside, in a greased (cooking spray) casserole dish.  If baking in a casserole dish, bake covered at 350 for an hour or so.  Remove cover for last half of baking time for a top with some crunch.


 

MadMom's picture

(post #57240, reply #54 of 135)

Cissy, this is very similar to the dressing I make, although I tried the Jimmy Dean maple sausagea few years back, and it added a very good flavor to the dressing.  Everyone gobbled it down, so have been using it since.



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Cissy's picture

(post #57240, reply #55 of 135)

 tried the Jimmy Dean maple sausage


Mmmmm.  That sounds great.  Haven't bought the sausage yet for this year's turkey; will definitely try it.

Gretchen's picture

(post #57240, reply #56 of 135)

I like the maple sausage, and since you already add a bunch of sage to dressings, it would add a flavor.

Gretchen

Gretchen
AmyElliesMom's picture

(post #57240, reply #12 of 135)

Y'know, I might steal that cheese board idea from you, instead of our old hat "relish" tray. I have a jar of sweet pickles in the fridge from last year!

But fruit and cheese would be a nice change. And I could put some nice olives in a bowl, instead of those awful green things.

See, the relish tray just needs to grow up!

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ICDOCEAN1's picture

(post #57240, reply #14 of 135)

No it is not ever too early to discuss Thanksgiving dinner plans.  I almost started a discussion yesterday, but got side tracked by a pork roast birthday dinner.


I said last year that I would not do T-day dinner again because it is a lot of work and the ungratefuls basically eat and run.  We have a few invitations, but DH is going to drive up to VA. and pick up the oldest grand daughter (there will not be an ounce of ketchup in the house for the turkey).  It only seemed polite to ask her father for dinner, (sans the ex or the mid-life girlfriend).  Now I am making dinner because I do not want to impose upon good friends and other family members or eat at one of the tacky buffets. 


Fresh roasted oysters on the grill while the turkey cooks...spiced olives and artichoke antipasti.


I bought a frozen turkey just the other day (13 lbs-$11).  I have tried the fresh turkeys,  expensive turkeys and capon from time to time.  I have learned that with todays brining/roasting methods the turkey comes out great without all of the added expense for people that don't care...I'm happy, their happy...


I have not decided which recipe to use for the turkey, but it will be from A New Way To Cook (Alice Waters brine recipe/adapted) or Diane Morgan Brined Turkey.  At this moment I have a pan of turkey wings over celery, onions, carrots, and seasonings roasting away for the stock for gravy.  I am trying Alton Browns method this year from Bon Appetit.  It is great to have some of the work out of the way, but freezer space is at a premium at the moment!


I have a recipe for a cranberry conserve that everyone enjoys and I have to make a double/triple batch to share with my neighbor.  I make a sausage stuffing with "real" bread cubes and then an oyster dressing with a basic "English stuffing" layered with local, fresh, sauteed cracker crumbed oysters.  That is also a double recipe upon request for the neighbor.


I enjoy roasted potatoes and it is a shame to have a lonely turkey in the big girl Viking, so roasted potatoes it will be.  I am not quite sure on the green veggie, but I like to make an old recipe from Gourmet, Green Beans with Mushroom-Madeira Sauce.  Wonderful sweet potatoes of some kind like my favorite Sweet Potato Rum Casserole or spiced sweet potatoes.


Pumpkin pie with cinnamon ice cream...


Now that I have said all of this, there is a possibility that my sister will come with her family and she has a few special dishes that she wants to make so I just might get off the hook for all the doings. 


In any event, I love hearing about whatever everyone else is planning and bringing to the table.  Whatever the meal plan is, it is nice to have family around. 


So enjoy...


 


 

Gretchen's picture

(post #57240, reply #15 of 135)

I started writing last night--have about 20 things down. I think choices will have to be made!


Turkey, bread stuffing (may try to find chestnuts this year), cornbread dressing, a lot of gravy, baked rice with mushrooms and herbs (no mash down this way, although that is what I grew up with).  Scalloped oysters, maybe roasted beets and carrots, something green--maybe long cooked pole beans with ham and onion, probably some brussels sprouts if I can find good ones. Son makes absolutely delicious collards--haven't consulted with them yet.   Rolls (looking at some sour cream thyme rolls done in muffin tins in MS's T'giving issue)--or Sister Schubert's. Oh, and sweet potato pudding--did it last year and it was good.


Appetizers still to be thought of. Thinking about some foie gras stuffed in figs a la "French kisses".  And maybe a sweet olive confiture with goat cheese on baguette slices. Or I may do some pickled shrimp or crab stuffed mushrooms.  I'll have to calculate the foie gras consumers to see if it is worth opening some of my stash.


Dessert will be whatever friends bring--she makes a wonderful pecan pie.  Although I am thinking about a pear clafouti. The pears this year are SO good.


There will be some other stuff too.  It wouldn't be T'giving without having 20 dishes on the table.


Gretchen


Edited 11/7/2005 9:12 am ET by Gretchen

Gretchen
Debby's picture

(post #57240, reply #95 of 135)

Wow! Gretchen--this sounds awesome!  Do you make a lot of your menu ahead of the actual day?


Debby

Gretchen's picture

(post #57240, reply #97 of 135)

I had to go back and see what I had committed to!!  Actually most of it comes together pretty much the day before and T'giving morning.  I make the stuffing and dressing (cornbread will get made ahead and dried) the day before and in the fridge. A lot of it is just put in the dish, add the butter and bake.

Gretchen

Gretchen