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Cooking Pork Tenderloin

MadMom's picture

Y'all know me...I cannot resist anything which is free.  So, I brought home a Central Market marinated pork tenderloin.  I chose the one which I thought was least offensive, which was a herb-dijon.  Here's my question.  How on earth do I cook the thing?  Should I brown it first, toss it in a hot oven (how hot and for how long), slice it into medallions, or what?  I know, I, too, would rather mix my own marinade, but what can I say...it was free, and it is going to be dinner tonight.



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ashleyd's picture

I have this theory (which may not apply in the US but certainly does here) that if your meat is not quite all that it should be then conceal the fact with some kind of external coating. Sometimes I think I may be just a little too cynical. ;)


“In victory you deserve Champagne, in defeat you need it.”
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Edited 4/18/2005 6:29 pm ET by ashleyd

Age is unimportant unless you’re a cheese.

MadMom's picture

That's a thought...I have a recipe for roasted pork loin from FC which uses bread crumbs, mixed with cumin and paprika, some shallots, etc. and is applied to the loin after it's cooked for a while...over a coating of dijon mustard.  I'm thinking I could use the same approach to this, although since it's so small, put the bread crumbs on from the first...should I brown the loin first, though, or just coat it and toss it into the oven, and what should the oven temp be?



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

Brown it first on all sides, then put in the oven at 400° until done. Mean's directions will probably tell you the temp. You want it to still be pink in the center.My guess would be about 170°.


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Glenys's picture

Way to high. I did a very small loin last night to 147°F before resting. At most I'd say 155°F after resting.

Jean's picture

Ok, it was just a guess. But now I'm hungry for pork loin.

Veni, vidi, velcro        I came,  I  saw,  I stuck around.


http://www.thebreastcancersite.com

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
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help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

I set the thermometer to 155, which resulted in a perfectly cooked rack of pork last time...might take it out at 150, though.  Tonight's supper is simple...some roasted potatoes, which are in the oven now, the pork loin, and some roasted asparagus.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

MEANCHEF's picture

Tenderloin.  Sear in pan and 400-425 oven for 12 minutes .  rest for 5-10 minutes. rosy pink

MadMom's picture

Actually, maybe my thermometer is off, but I did cook it to 155, let it rest, and it was nice, juicy, and just pink in the middle.  It was delicious, and you can't beat the price!



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Lexi's picture

That's how I do it.  I aim for 140 or so (in case anyone reading this doesn't know, trichinosis is killed at 137), but less than 145, and let it rest.  Internal temp ends up around 150 -- rosy pink and juicy.  The timing is just about what you posted, sometimes less.  That said, both my daughters -- one in Ohio, one in Colorado -- buy tenders that are easily twice the diameter of the ones I find here.  They take a little longer to finish, longer in Colorado than in Ohio.  


At what temp do you pull pork loin from the oven?  Do you brine them?  



Didn't see your last post about avoiding pork loin.  Why do you avoid it?


Edited 4/19/2005 12:15 pm ET by lee

 

whatscooking's picture

I do pork tenderloin about the same - aim for 140.  I learned this from Bruce Aidells' Complete Meat, a personal favorite. 


That is very curious - what you said about your daughters getting the same cut of meat but much larger in size.  I've seen them tied together to form a larger roast but they're always about the same size. 


With back ribs, I always look for the smallest racks, thinking younger animal, more tender.  I don't know if this logic is faulty or not.  It is just something I've always done. 


Edited 4/19/2005 12:34 pm ET by Toni

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
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Lexi's picture

Saying they are twice the thickness of the tenders I buy was somewhat exaggerated, but they are definitely larger.  Have you tried Bruce Aidell's spice rub for pork?  It's one of the best I've had.  I use it for chicken and beef too.  I included it last Christmas in the gift baskets I put together for friends.  Every single person has commented on how good it is.

 

 

ChefRobert's picture

Have two favorite ways of cooking pork tenderloin.


Secure sprigs of rosemary along loin with butcher twine, sear in a hot CA skillet, roast for 10-12 min, or less, in a 450°F oven to an internal temperature of 140°F and let rest.  Temp will rise to 145° or so.  Deglaze the pan with port and make a sauce.


Rub the tenderloin with Southern Dry Rub (Joy of Cooking, 1997 ed., pp 86-87) and grill to 140°F


In both approaches the pork is pinkish and moist.  Bob


What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

lwj2's picture

Last week I took a pork tenderloin, put it in SWMBO's clay cooker (it's about a 13x10 or so pan with clay lid).

I added apple cider to about a third the way up the loin, added cider vinegar to taste (for me, this means cutting the sweet of the cider to tart), sliced two Granny Smith apples on a corer/peeler and covered the loin. Then I sliced two medium onions and covered the apples, putting the rest in the liquid.

Cover, cooked in a 250° oven until internal temp was 150°. Took about four hours, as I recall.

Cheers!

Leon Jester
Leon
Marcia's picture

Try fresh sage leaves in place of the rosemary for a change. The sage gets crispy and is wonderful. I use lots, and we all fight over it.

ChefRobert's picture

Thanks Marcia.  The sage survived the winter and is starting to put out new leaves.  Will have to remember to try the tenderloin with fresh sage.  I like to put fresh sage leaves and thin lemon slices under poultry skin before roasting a whole bird or grilling boned breasts.  Bob

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

Marcia's picture

I haven't tried sage under chicken skin. That's a great idea and I thank you for it. We have to wait a bit for our fresh herbs as we get them from a CSA. I do grow chives, but we live on a heavily wooded lot so there is little sun in most of the space. We will try another rosemary plant in our one sunny spot. So far, no luck and I so love fresh rosemary. We had it in abundance at our last home.

ChefRobert's picture

Your welcome.  We have rosemary growing in a pot that we put out at the end of May when there is no longer a frost danger.  It is nice in the middle of winter to be able pick off a sprig and use it.  Also have bay laurel in a pot and do the same thing.  The sage plant (a perennial) is about 8 years old and we thought it died a year or so ago, but appears to have survived or self-sowed.  Unfortunately, our French tarragon didn't, need to replace it and some spreading thyme varieties as well.  These and lavender are not bothered by the woodchucks and bunnies, but annuals like basil, etc., are fair game!  We grow them in pots on a porch landing.  The woodchucks LOVE flat leaf parsley!  Bob


What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!


Edited 4/20/2005 2:00 pm ET by Chef Robert

What do you mean there is no chocolate in this recipe!

Marcia's picture

We have several varieties of spreading thyme, but can't use it for cooking as it is in an area right next to a neighbor's lawn where he has noxious chemicals spread very frequently. It's beautiful and smells wonderful, too.


You remind me of a beautiful, enormous jade plant we used to keep in a pot. A squirrel ate it leaf by leaf and oddly enough, I enjoyed watching or I would have brought the pot inside. We had also had groundhogs who developed a taste for basil, which I thought was unusual.

whatscooking's picture

Yes I have and I've given it as a gift too.  When I have some in the cabinet, I tend to use it on everything chicken, salmon, skirt steak.  It works well as an all purpose seasoning. 


There are some great dishes in that book.  Bruce Aidells in not shy about seasoning and bold flavors. 

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

MEANCHEF's picture

I thought we were talking tenderloin.  Still way too high.

Glenys's picture

What difference does it make if it's tenderloin or loin for an internal temperature reading? 145°F-150°F should be acceptable.

MEANCHEF's picture

Ok you win.  You are too high for both.  I cook pork tenderloin just like beef tenderloin.


Pork loin I avoid.

Wolvie's picture

I do it your way - but I suspect we like ours a bit pinker, shall we say, than others. :-)


Just had some pork tenderloin last nite, as a matter of fact. Grilled tho.



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Geoffchef's picture

You haven't read "Kitchen Confidential" have you? Ya think they're going to marinate the good stuff and give it away?
Not that I am not a fan of marinated tenderpig. Did one of my faves last weekend. Mixed up a minced shallot with 2 cloves minced garlic and about an equal amount of minced ginger. Added a splash of light soy, another of dark, a Tbsp of honey, a glob of Sambal and a few glugs of medium dry sherry. Poured all this into a big ziploc with two tenderloins and chucked it into the fridge. On Sunday I built a good lump charcoal fire in the barbie, raked the coals off to the two ends, plunked the piggies in the middle and basted them with the marinade whilst grilling some asparagus, onions and zucchini chunks over the hot bits. Took the porkers off at 145 and rested them 10 minutes. Served with twice baked spuds with cheddar and chives. Yum.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
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ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

KarenP's picture

Welcome Home!

MadMom's picture

If I read Kitchen Confidential, I might finally be able to lose my half a Sally, because I would permanently lose my appetite.  Actually, the stuff at Central Market is usually pretty good (this one turned out delicious.)  They send selected customers coupons, and you get certain items free if you spend $30 or $40 or whatever.  It's usually really good stuff, and the idea is that if you try it, you'll buy it again.



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

debe5t's picture

Thanks for explaining how you got it for free.My imagination was working overtime! LOL Deb

whatscooking's picture

Could you please "talk" a little about light soy versus dark.  Do they have significantly different flavors?  I have several recipes that call for a little of both.  I just usually use whatever soy sauce I have around, usually Kikkoman's.  I think that would be considered dark. 


I've been looking for light, but all I've been able to find is Lite, Kikkomans low-sodium, I believe.

Chicago-style deep-dish:  "Pizza for people who just aren't fat enough"
Anthony Bourdain
http://theoutdatedkitchen.blogspot.com/

Glenys's picture

For supermarket shoping,a simple way to determine subtle versus strong flavours in Asian products is to buy Japanese for a less intense flavour and Chinese usually weighs in on the heavier side. Soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, vinegars- all are stronger for use in Chinese cuisines. Having said that, if you venture into Asian specialty stores, both offer light to strong options for their cooking. "Lite" generally refers to less salt but as the soy sauce gets darker, it's usually less salty.
If I'm going to do a Vietnamese dish, I'll get their soy sauce to taste the authentic flavour. Generally however I use Kikkoman for everyday salad dressings and ABC Brand Kecap Manis, the sweet thick soy of Indonesia and Thailand for the best sticky marinades for meat.

samchang's picture

This will depend on what kind of Kikkoman you have. If it's the one brewed in America (is it Wisconsin?), it is a standard Japanese style soy sauce, which is actually considered light. Go to a strictly Japanese market and you'll find Kikkoman from Japan. As a matter of fact, you'll find 5 or 6 different varieties of Kikkoman. That said, American Kikkoman is pretty good.


The 'light' and 'dark' distinction comes into play in especially Chinese cooking, where 'light' (and most definitely not 'lite!') is a thin and salty version that isn't as, well, dark as its counterpart. Pour some out in a spoon, and along the edges you'll be able to see through the liquid. The one we use is from Kimlan, a Taiwanese product. Be sure to get the one that has the small words 'Grade A' on it. 'Dark' soy sauces are made with a sugar component, originally a maltose of some sort, but usually brown sugar now. It is thicker and absorbs a lot more light. It is, contrary to what one might think, not as salty as 'light' soy, and while it isn't sweet, there's a sweeter aftertaste to it.


Even as 'light' soy is not to be confused with 'lite' soy, 'dark' soy is not to be confused with soy paste, sweet soy, thick soy, or tamari, which is soy sauce made without wheat, a grain found in soy sauces.


Confused yet?


Edited 4/20/2005 5:20 pm ET by samchang