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REC: Cinnamon Cookies

Meryl's picture

REC: Cinnamon Cookies (post #63320)

in

I just made these last night and they're delicious - perfect for the holidays.

CINNAMON COOKIES

1 cup sugar
1/2 cup margarine (I used unsalted butter)
1 egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/2 cups flour
1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon (I used 1 tsp Penzey's Korintje and 1/2 tsp Penzey's China Cassia)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
cinnamon sugar (I mixed 1/4 cup sugar with 4 tsp Penzey's Korintje cinnamon)

1. In a mixer bowl, cream together sugar and butter.
2. Beat in egg and vanilla.
3. Combine flour, cinnamon, baking powder and salt.
4. Add to butter mixture.
5. Blend well.
6. Cover and refrigerate 2 hours or till firm enough to roll into balls.
7. Shape dough into small balls about 3/4 inch in diameter. (For most batches, I did heaping teaspoons)
8. Roll in cinnamon sugar to coat.
9. Set cookies 1 inch apart on lightly greased cookie sheets. (I lined cookie sheets with parchment paper, and set cookies about 2 inches apart).
10. Bake at 350 F for 10 minutes or till the edges are lightly browned. (I baked about 15-16 minutes, using heaping teaspoon-size cookies). [note: rounded teaspoon-size cookies take about 12-13 minutes].
11. Cool slightly on pans, then remove to racks to cool completely.

48 servings

posted by PetesNina - Recipezaar


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst


Edited 11/18/2004 7:25 pm ET by Meryl

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

MadMom's picture

Sounds like snickerdoodles...do they taste the same?

Things are going to get a lot worse before they get worse.
Lily Tomlin

Meryl's picture

I've never tried snickerdoodles, (am I the only one on earth)?, but according to the reviews on 'Zaar, these are similar, but more cinnamony.


Edited to say, this makes sense, since these cookies are not only rolled in cinnamon/sugar, but they have cinnamon in the batter - snickerdoodles do not (at least the recipes I've seen).



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst


Edited 11/17/2004 7:26 pm ET by Meryl

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Gretchen's picture

My thought too. Love them.

Gretchen

Gretchen
deejeh's picture

As a side note - made the Snickerdoodles from the current Holiday issue.  I've never baked/tasted a snickerdoodle before, but fell in love with these.  They got raves from my office-mates.


deej

helena's picture

Good to know!

helena's picture

I might really like these, they're going in my files, thanks!

ehBeth's picture

Meryl, are these flat wafery cookies or lumpy ones?

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
Meryl's picture

I wouldn't call these wafer-like. If you drop them by tsp or rounded tsp, they're rounded and raised a little on top, crunchy on edges and chewy inside. If you drop by heaping tsp, they spread a little more, are still slightly raised, but more crunchy throughout.  With the FL heat and humidity, my cookies rarely are crispy by the next day, anyway, even though I store them well. The only way I can keep them close to the original texture is to freeze them. But I guess you don't have to worry about heat and humidity in Canada, at least not in November!


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

ehBeth's picture

Dang.
I'm mad for cinnamon. My dad would like these ones. Now to find crispy wafery ones for me me me.

If you can't play a sport, be one.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
Meryl's picture

ehBeth,


I love crispy wafery cookies also. Let me know if you find a good one!


 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Meryl's picture

I just looked on Google for "Cinnamon Wafers" and found one from Southern Living, which I saved to file. It has less cinnamon in it than the one I posted, and it doesn't roll the cookies in cinnamon/sugar, but the main thing is that the dough is flattened with a fork after being dropped by rounded tsp. That could be the answer to getting the wafer-like texture we want. I may try the recipe I posted again, but flatten out the rounds before baking and see how it turns out. If I try the SL recipe, I'll roll them in cinnamon/sugar first, then flatten. 


Here's the SL recipe, along with my suggestions, in case you want to check it out. (note: use butter instead of margarine for a crispier texture):


CINNAMON WAFERS


Yield: 78 Servings


2/3 Cup Butter (or margarine), softened (I would use butter)


1 tsp Vanilla extract


2 Cup All-purpose flour


1 Cup Sugar


2 tsp Baking powder


1 tsp cinnamon, Ground (my note: I would use 1 1/2 tsp)


1/2 tsp Salt


1 Egg, slightly beaten


1/4 Cup Milk


Cream butter; gradually add sugar and cinnamon, beating unti light and fluffy. Add egg and vanilla; beat well. Combine flour, baing powder and salt. Add to creamed mixture alternately with milk, beginning and ending with flour mixture; mix well after each addition. Drop dough by rounded teaspoonfuls onto greased cookie sheets. Flatten with a fork; bake at 375 F. for 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Cool on wire racks.


YIeld: 6 1/2 dozen.


Recipe by: Southern Living, September, 1981, p. 196


 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

ehBeth's picture

Butter, but of course!

This looks like a good variant. I think I'll try to do this after the dentist on Saturday.

Ever since I went to Ikea to get sheepskins for the dogs on the weekend, I've been jonesing crisy wafers. They've got those ginger orange ones, and cinnamon and ...

Thanks for finding that. I'd kind of forgotten that Southern Living can be a good resource.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
Meryl's picture

Just thought of something else - maybe we should omit the baking powder?


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

ehBeth's picture

I've just been poking around - looking at ginger wafer recipes at a few sites - they've also got baking powder. Must search more.

If you can't play a sport, be one.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
Meryl's picture

Maybe we shouldn't fool around with the baking powder! On the other hand, we are mad scientists, aren't we????


Here are some tips I found:


"For crisp and crunchy cookies, try any of these tips:


Bake cookies a few minutes longer than suggested (Duh) and immediately remove them to wire racks to cool.


Make with all butter and a high amount of white sugar.


Use bread flour.


Bake in the lower third of oven.


Baking Powder and Baking Soda - Baking powder and baking sodas are both leaveners with one main difference, baking powder contains an acidic ingredient (cream of tartar) and baking soda is, well, just baking soda. Baking powder produces lighter colored and puffier cookies than baking soda does. This is due to the fact that one keeps the dough acidic (baking powder) and one helps to neutralize the acidity (baking soda). "


from cafecreosote.com


 


 


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

ehBeth's picture

Maybe half a batch with baking powder and half a batch with baking soda?

You know, that ^^^ idea seems normal to me, after spending a few years reading here. I've tried a few things with split recipes as a result. Now I just have to learn to deal with the weird looks people give me when I mention my split recipe projects.

If you can't play a sport, be one.
If you can't play a sport, be one.
Meryl's picture

Maybe half a batch with baking powder and half a batch with baking soda?


Go for it! And don't forget to post your results.


You know, that ^^^ idea seems normal to me, after spending a few years reading here. I've tried a few things with split recipes as a result. Now I just have to learn to deal with the weird looks people give me when I mention my split recipe projects.


Well, they're from a different planet than we are. We're from the Planet of Food Obsession.


 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Meryl's picture

Hey ehBeth,


I just saw these posted on another site. They're supposed to be crispy wafer-like. (Notice they have no leaveners). Maybe you can tweak them to make cinnamon ones.


From the poster: "This recipe is from a local cookbook in Louisiana and the notation made by its contributor are that “these wafer-thin, crisp cookies are found all over Madrid and are ideal to eat with ice cream or custard desserts.”

Lenguas de Gato-"cat's tongue" cookies

1/4 lb sweet butter
2 egg whites, unbeaten
3/4 cup powdered sugar
3/4 cup flour
1/4 teaspoon vanilla
pinch salt
1/8 teaspoon lemon rind (optional)

Cream butter until light and fluffy. Add sugar, vanilla, and lemon rind.
Beat for one more minute. Add egg whites. Gradually stir in flour and salt.

Put dough into a pastry bag or cake decorator fitted with a 1/4 inch round
opening. Press dough onto a greased cookie sheet in 2 1/2 lengths, well
spaced. Bake at 350 degrees F. for 5 minutes, or until very lightly
brown. WATCH – THESE COOKIES WILL BURN IN A FLASH!!!!!!!!!!!

Makes about 70 cookies.


Edited: here's another that was posted:


Lengua de Gato


Sangkap (Ingredients):


½ cup butter


2/3 cup sugar


¼ cup egg whites (2 eggs)


1 1/3 cup cake flour


¼ teaspoon salt


½ teaspoon vanilla


Pagluto (Cooking Procedure):


1. Cream butter and sugar.


2. Add egg white gradually then fold in flour with salt.


3. Add vanilla and stir mixture until smooth.


4. Use a cake decorating tube to form mixture into oblong shapes.


5. Drop each shape onto a slightly greased cookie sheet.


6. Baked at 375F for approximately 5-8 min. or until light brown.


7. Remove immediately and cool.


8. Store in tightly covered containers.


 


 




 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst


Edited 11/22/2004 5:21 pm ET by Meryl

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

RheaS's picture

The second one is a Filipino recipe. My mom used to make them for us whenever she had leftover egg whites. I remember them being melt in your mouth tender and very buttery. One of my favorite cookies although I don't recall ever making them myself.

Meryl's picture

That's interesting - didn't know the second one was Filipino. Thanks for the info - the cookies sound great.


Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

Wolvie's picture

cafe creosote ? Good grief! ;-)


I like crisp - but not tar!!


 


"Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, 'Something is out of tune."  Carl Jung

 

Meryl's picture

"cafe creosote ? Good grief! ;-)"


What is that??? I've never heard of it.



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

UncleDunc's picture

Message #16, last line is "from cafecreosote.com"

Meryl's picture

I know, but I'm referring to Wolvie's "Good grief! ;-)" I've never heard of Cafe Creosote, so she must know something I don't know!


 



Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. --Judith Viorst

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

UncleDunc's picture

Oh. I misunderstood what it was you'd never heard of.

I figured Cafe Creosote was named for the creosote bush rather than the wood preservative. Wolvie's reaction suggested she was leaning the other way.

Wolvie's picture

Uncle Dunc got it - but - I was JOKING!! ;-)


It obviously fell flat!


"Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, 'Something is out of tune."  Carl Jung

 

schnitzel's picture

I laughed. ;·)


Amy W    Cooks Talk T&T Recipes

"The only real stumbling block is fear of failure. In cooking you've got to have a what-the-hell attitude."   Julia Child

Wolvie's picture

of course! :-)


I made some strawberry spread - can't really call it jelly or jam per se, yesterday and thought of you. LOL


2-16 oz bags whole strawberries(frozen) 1 cup sugar, and the juice of 1/2 of a large lemon. I thawed the berries, put the sugar over the top and let that sit for an hour, then brought it to a boil over medium heat. Cut the heat down and let it simmer for 1 1/2 hours - very yummy. Tastes much better than the stuff with a lot of sugar, but then - you know me.


"Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, 'Something is out of tune."  Carl Jung

 

schnitzel's picture

Thought of me, did you? LOL


Sounds like strawberry preserves, yum.


Amy W

Wolvie's picture

yep. Have thought of you often, lately. :-)

"Through pride we are ever deceiving ourselves. But deep down below the surface of the average conscience a still, small voice says to us, 'Something is out of tune."  Carl Jung