NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

All about BREAD cookbook

winetogo's picture

So, first of all, I have to admit that I am addicted to cookbooks!
That being said, I want to get started making really good, chewy crunchy home made breads. I love bread, but I've always said that I was a cook but not a baker.
So, I need some help! Enter a new COOKBOOK! Problem is, I can get 1, per the boss!
I need help getting so good that she buys me another one.

Any thoughts??

Joe

avak123's picture

My vote would be for The Bread Bakers Apprentice by Peter Reinhart!

KarenP's picture

Any thoughts??

  Start practicing with a straight face..this ol thing? I've had it for months.
  Second for Breadbakers Apprentice.  Peter Reinhart is a spectacular instructor and his directions are very clear.  I saw Peter Reinhart yesterday doing four items from his latest book, on whole and multigrain breads.  They were all delicious and some great seeded crackers. 

Quilter's picture

I need help getting so good that she buys me another one.


Another vote for The Bread baker's apprentice. And when you get so good that she buys you another one, well, then you need Whole Grain Breads also by Peter Reinhart.

roz's picture

Thumbs up for Peter Reinhart's BBA! And the Whole Grain Breads as well.
I made a whole wheat focaccia dough over eight days ago, forgot about it in the fridge, made it yesterday for lunch and it was perfect! I love Peter Reinhart!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
MadMom's picture

Perhaps she could get BBA and Whole Grain Breads and explain to the boss that they came as a set? 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

roz's picture

Great Idea!

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
winetogo's picture

Very nice idea! I looked up the PR's BBA, and it looks perfect!
Is this a good one for a beginner or should I start elsewhere and graduate to this?

What are the most important couple cookware items/tools that I will need to buy to make the most difference in bread making? I have the kitchen-aid mixer, almost never used after 5 years!!! (I'm not a baker!) and a very tight budget but want to get started on the right foot?

In other worlds, if you love making killer breads and got to start over, what tools would you put in your kitchen????

MadMom's picture

It has been said before, but you need to pick a recipe you think you will like, and make it again and again, until you have it perfect!  Most people use a plain white bread recipe, but if you prefer whole wheat, use that.  Some bread can be baked in a loaf pan; these are cheap and you can pick one up at Target or Walmart.  That's probably the easiest way to get started.  You already have the mixer, although you didn't say what size.  A smaller one might get overheated, but just let it cool off and keep going.  Don't mix at too high a speed, though.  I think KA suggests you mix at 2 or about.  Once you get the hang of it, you might want to try artisan breads, baked free form on a baking sheet or tile, but for now, a loaf pan and a KA (or strong arms!) is about all you need.


The BBA is a good book for anyone, beginner or expert.




Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!
Gretchen's picture

I thought enough people had recommended BBA, but I will add my endorsement. What Peter Reinhart does is explain what it is that is happening to the various ingredients that makes bread   bread.


But to also expand on what MadMom and others have said about making the same recipe many times is what PR teaches in his classes. His "mantra" is that you have to know what dough looks and feels like when it is "right", and that is only by experience.  Flour acts differently depending on humidity, climate, etc. and so you may have to add more liquid or more flour on any given day to make the dough "right".  This isn't as hard as it sounds by any means.  Often you hear dough referred to as "soft as a baby's bottom", and that is true.  It is fun fun fun.


Gretchen
Gretchen
roz's picture

Tools? With PR's Whole Grain Breads recipes, I never use my KA! You make a soaker, make a biga, let rest or autolyse at room temp and/or in the fridge. The next day, make the final dough and knead. I use one bowl, plastic bags. What I couldn't dispense with is my digital scale! Everything gets weighed and I like baking that way.

I bought cheap bread baskets with a linen insert for little money, oiled and floured the linen and use those instead of bannetons. I don't have a bread peel, I use a cutting board well floured. You already have cooling racks probably. And I think there is a thread on baking tiles vs. pizza stone somewhere.

My biggest expense was buying an electric grain mill. But it has paid for itself by the amount of whole wheat, buckwheat, oat groats, etc. if has ground this past year!

Good luck.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
KarenP's picture

He suggested in his class on Sunday that you ask a local beermaker for spent grain. They're usually more than willing to give some up.

roz's picture

You would think that here in Ireland I would not have a problem finding spent grain! The Biddy Early Brewery in Inagh, Co. Clare, sold, SOLD their brewer's license to someone in Cork. And while in Dublin last week I went to a micro-brewer and asked for spent grain. No can do! The barmaid looked at me cross-eyed!

I had no trouble while in Maryland last January, just went to Rock Bottom in Arlington, VA and got a quart of the stuff. I understand it freezes well.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
KarenP's picture

  I would think that in Ireland spent grain from Guiness would be a national treasure!  I'm sure that they are giving it or selling it to a nearby farmer for part of their livestock feed...probably hers.  
 

Gretchen's picture

He did that in our class too. The spent grain bread was absolutely lucious. I may need to get downtown before our beach trip.  And, of course, the type of "spent grain" makes all the difference in the bread.


Roz, I don't think the barmaid was the person to ask. Probably a manager.  ;o)


Gretchen
Gretchen
roz's picture

I had originally asked to speak to the brew master, he was out. She knew what I wanted, but was being obtuse.

Be impeccable with your word. Don't take anything personally. Don't make assumptions. Do your best. Don Miguel Ruiz
KarenP's picture

explain to the boss that they came as a set?

Excellent Idea!