NEW! Google Custom Search

Loading

If you were stranded on a desert isle...

nihon_no_cook's picture

*
Here's a poser for you. The moving companies are coming on Friday to bid on our move back to civilization, and we have to tell them what we'll be shipping by air (takes about 2-3 weeks to get to US) and what is going by boat (takes about 2 months to get to US). Whatever we ship by air we will have to do without for the last two weeks in Japan, and will have to survive on for 2 months in the US. We'll be sending a bed, and some chairs, and some kitchen stuff, and some linens . . . Christmas stuff has to go by boat, I think. : (

So how do I divide up the kitchen stuff? What would you ship if you had to pack your "survival gear" for your kitchen? Measuring cups & spoons, of course, and some spoons and spatulas and stuff. But what other hardware can't you cook without? Let's say you have space for one box, about 2'x2'x2'. Pack well, my friends!

Rebecca's picture

*
7-qt pot plus 3 or 5 qt pot (one for the pasta & one for the sauce). Good luck w/the move, nihon!

Chiffonade_'s picture

*
One way to figure this out is to consider the meals you cook on a
i day to day basis.
Not fancy party stuff, but regular come-home-from-work-and-prepare-it food. As you are picturing yourself preparing, serving and consuming these meals, have a pen and paper handy. As the tools used for prep like this pop up in your mind, jot EVERYTHING down. It will take you about 15 minutes in total to do this and it will be time well spent - especially when you
i don't
pay to express-ship that cheese knife or double boiler. It wouldn't pay for me to tell you what tools would work for me in this context, as the foods we prepare for weeknight meals may be very different :)

Jean_'s picture

*
Yesterday I had some time to kill between appointments so I stopped at the local dollar store...you know...nothing that costs over a dollar. Well, I was amazed at the variety of kitchen tools and gadgets that they had. The point being, if it only costs a buck, why use up premium space? If you can get it cheap, put it on the slow boat or give it away.

FlavourGirl_'s picture

*
Do you have family in Cleveland? If so, don't worry about the small stuff just pack the really important stuff like a good knife(s) and your most used pot and skillet and borrow the rest.

Carolina's picture

*
My knives, Oxo peeler and tongs, large kitchen spoon, large whisk, 7 quart Le Creuset pot, #10 cast iron skillet, large colander, and church key/corkscrew combo.

Chiffonade_'s picture

*
Carolina...don't you think it would be costly to ship a 7 quart cast iron pot/lid? AND a cast iron skillet too? I will fight to the death for my Le Creuset (and am totally jealous that you live so close the outlets!) but for this purpose, would you not choose lighter weight cookware? (The dollar store thing is very valid, you could put together a whole "cheapie" kitchen with that stuff!!)

Moving 2000 miles, I gave away so much stuff, I couldn't believe my final total was 5,500 lbs. I think cooking equipment
i alone
made up 2,500 lbs. We gave away beds, a microwave, file cabinets...all hefty things.

nihon_no_cook's picture

*
I'm not terribly worried about the cost of the shipment, as our company foots the bill, and I have 2500 pounds of air shipment to fool around with. But some large items (like matresses, etc.) count as more than their actual weight, so I am trying to come in well below my limit, so I don't have to start pulling things out of boxes on moving day because I have 10 pounds extra.

I'm hoping to avoid buying too many things, even at the cheapo stores, since basically it will be a duplicate of something I already own. Don't really have the space, the bank account, or the will to take that on. And my family is back on the East Coast, so borrowing isn't an option. Spent an hour in the car on the way to work this morning making up the preliminary list - we'll have to run it past the movers on Friday and see what their estimate of it is. Fun, Fun, Fun!

Chiffonade_'s picture

*
Estimate, schmestimate. I was given an estimate of 2,000 lbs.
i tops
for the things I was moving. I gave away many heavy, bulky items...file cabinets, beds, including a high-bed from IKEA
i after
receiving this estimate.
i Even with this purging of large, heavy or easily replaceable items, my move wound up being 5,500 lbs.
Be very careful...some companies give a low ball estimate so you will use them, then lower the boom once the move is done. Mayflower, a usually respected, long established mover, did this to me. Be very careful.

Carolina's picture

*
Guess I was thinking about the things I use most in my kitchen. Also, the cast iron skillets belonged to my grandmother, who died at age 93 almost 20 years ago; While all my Le Creuset pieces were Christmas presents from the DH. Lots of sentimentally wrapped up in my cookware. Hard to imagine having some mover think of them as just pieces of cookware, when to me, they are memories.

Lemon*'s picture

*
Think McDonalds.

nihon_no_cook's picture

*
You've never tried living on restaurant food for two months, obviously . . . the amount of salt in most of it makes me feel like I'm about to dry up and blow away, after only one or two days.

Plus there's that pesky diet to worry about . . .