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Nesting Weirdness

avak123's picture

Am I just nuts? I am "doing the nesting thing" that I did before the birth of my DD - now 8 years ago - for my new 5-month-old-rescue-puppy. This event has pulled a compulsive side of me that I have never before witnessed. Is this wacko?


Henry will be arriving tomorrow at 9:00 A.M. I have sanitized, cleaned beyond reason, I am nervous-feel sick...what is this all about?


Has anyone ever had a similar experience?


TIA,


Amy


 


 

AnnL's picture

Oh, my goodnes, no it's not wacko.  Perfectly normal!  Get it all nice and neat and clean because it's going to be awhile before you see it like that again!  :-)

AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

Quilter's picture

Sounds perfectly normal to me!  When we got our Irish Setter rescue last year, I fussed and paced for days before he arrived. Made sure he had a place that would be all his own, because after all the poor baby (he was 9 years old) was coming by plane all by himself, all the way from Toronto to northern B.C. and he'd be so worried, and frightened.... He stepped out of the shipping crate, tail wagging, with a big goofy grin on his face.  I was almost in tears, I was so relieved to finally have him with us, all healthy and apparently happy. And in desperate need of a tree to water!

SallyBR1's picture

I think it is beautiful!

I wish every single little rescue dog would find a home as filled with love as Henry will!

You ARE fully aware that we want pictures, right? ASAP - you can drool all you want, go nuts over him, but get a hold of yourself and TAKE PICTURES FOR US!!!!!

:-)

(enjoy the feeling - just like being in love for the first (or seventh time).... the butterflies in the stomach are nice part of the game!)

 


 


"The beauty of a Sally is how neatly she can be divided"
(CookiMonster, Dec 2005)

pammysue's picture

Bless you and the rescue horse you rode in on.  We're working with our l5th rescue doggie dear (a purebred border collie who is smarter than both of us put together) and I've lost count of the cats.  Many horses - ring-necked doves, geese....goat!  (Wasn't crazy about the goat and he wasn't crazy about me.)   May you all nest together in harmony,  peace and love.  I have a hunch you will.....  cj


Keep us posted!  Exciting stuff! 


 

elizaram's picture

a purebred border collie who is smarter than both of us put together


Saw a bumper sticker today that made me laugh out loud:


"My Border Collie Is Smarter Than Your Honor Student"


:-)




Congress [is] a massive organism that, amazingly, functions without a spine. --Patt Morrison, LA Times



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

avak123's picture

Thanks to everyone for the good thoughts. Henry and I have had a wonderful first day - he is precious in his "adolescent pup-ness!"


He is getting used to his crate, well sort of...he serenades me with melodic Samoyed "woo-hoo-ing." Definitely a character. Oh, I also learned of his LOVE for bubbles. Didn't matter that it was MY bubble bath he jumped into! LOL


Sally - I promise pics. I just need to figure out my digital camera - yikes!


All in all, he is the perfect addition to our little family.


-Amy


 

AnnL's picture

Didn't matter that it was MY bubble bath he jumped into! LOL


Oh, dear!  Were you in the tub at the time?  :-)  Well, I suppose with a white dog it's a good thing he likes baths!  :-)


Glad to hear he's settling in and you're enjoying him.  I hope you have many happy years together.


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

avak123's picture

Oh, dear!  Were you in the tub at the time?  :-) 


But, of course! LOL


He really is a delight. I do have one question. I have previously owned dogs that just DIDN'T LIKE the crate, and would "yip" in an attempt to get out. Eventually, and with a spray bottle of ice water, they came around.


With Henry, last night proved challenging. I think he has "crate anxiety."  He would whine, "woo-hoo" me, and WOULD NOT go to sleep - maybe 3 hours all night. Around 5:00 A.M., when he was quiet, I pulled him out and brought him in with me and he slept like a baby, on a rug by my bed.


Today, I plan on letting him spend more time in the crate, but with me in the room with him. Does this sound like a good idea? While he was fostered, I know he spent quite a bit of time in the crate. Perhaps they didn't care if he was "vocal," they had a separate house for rescues.


Any hints? Thanks Ann.


-Amy


 


 

AnnL's picture

I've always set up a crate in my bedroom for my rescues.  They really like being a part of the "pack" and especially at night sleeping with the pack is a privilege that all dogs want.  Once I know they're OK over night, I remove that crate--usually only a few weeks. 


But, I know other people who don't let their animals in their bedrooms, ever. <shrug>   No matter what you do, it's going to be an adjustment.  He may be fine in the crate with you in the room, but still be upset when you go upstairs.  My youngest never liked the crate and she would whine and whimper in there...sometimes it sounded like I was torturing her!!  But, if she could see me, she was fine. 


If you don't mind him in your bedroom but don't have another crate, you could try him loose in your room.  Then, if he does move off the rug (or where ever you want him to be), just take him right downstairs and into the crate.  No scolding, no talking, no reprimand, just remove him from the room.  He'll figure it out pretty quickly.  :-)  They usually figure out pretty quickly that the bedroom is for sleeping and nothing else.  My youngest wasn't housebroken when I got her (and it took months to get that concept through to her) but she never had an "accident" over night.  Most dogs want to keep the sleeping area clean.


He probably had other dogs to keep him company in the foster home so he might not have been as vocal there.  So, you'll just have to adopt another!  <g,d, & r>  ;-)


 


AnnL
Transitions Farm
Gardening, cooking, and riding
in Central Mass.

Ann
"The elders were wise.  They knew that man's heart, away from nature, becomes hard; they knew that lack of respect for growing, living things, soon led to lack of respect for humans, too."  Chief Luther Standing Bear, Lakota Sioux

avak123's picture

Thanks, Ann.


Yes, I think anxiety is the culprit here. He has been bounced around so much and needs to get a little stability.


I spoke with my obedience trainer this morning, and she suggested feeding him in the crate, treats in the crate, toys in the crate...anything to reprogram crate association with fun, not incarceration. Short crate stays, coupled with purpose-driven activities following those stays - walks, brief obedience exercises, outdoor games,...


Thanks again for the tips - they are very appreciated.


-Amy