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Chocolate-Raspberry Cookies & Cream

Cissy's picture

Issue #78:  page 42.  I made this recipe on Thursday and it was a huge hit.  Nobody spoke until every bowl was cleaned. 


The hardest part about preparing it was finding the Famous Chocolate Wafer thin chocolate cookies.  Publix doesn't keep them in the cookie aisle, but 'round the corner from the ice cream freezers, along with all the ice cream toppings.

knitpik's picture

Do we have such cookies in Canadian stores? What brand?

Heather's picture

Yes you do--they are the kind that people used to layer and frost with whipped cream and call a torte.
The brand is Famous, they come in an open-topped yellow package, they are made by Nabisco.


Edited 4/8/2006 5:19 pm by Heather

Heather's picture

Here they are--

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knitpik's picture

Thanks, Heather. I'll have to check next time I go to the store.

nutcakes's picture

I made that whipped cream 'cake' with them when I was a teenager. Everyone liked it but I've not eaten them since, so I don't know if they are good.

Heather's picture

I only use them for chocolate crumb crusts.

nutcakes's picture

What do you use those for? I recently had some leftover 'day old' --more like 5 day old-- brownies that were quite dry ( I don't like the wet/raw ones) and wondered in I could use them for anything, but I'm not about to make a cheesecake or such, it would also just sit around or go to the office gobblers--not worth the effort.

Heather's picture

Sorry I took so long to reply--I've been out of town. I use the crumbs for mud pie crusts when my kids want to reminisce about childhood food.

soccermom's picture

I think the picture posted below is the correct brand but I remember them in a white box. They're in every supermarket around here but usually up high (not a lot of profit margin, I guess) in the cookie aisle. Yummy, but make your teeth look gruesome afterwards :)

 


 

 

 

knitpik's picture

Do they taste good?

soccermom's picture

Not as good as a homemade chocolate chip cookie LOL but they have their place. I use them for chocolate crumb crusts. As someone else mentioned, they are expensive for what they are.

 


 

 

 

knitpik's picture

There's one suggestion for FC...find a home-made version for us.
Fc, can you hear us? LOL

Li's picture

I'd love for us to come up with a recipe, esp. one that doesn't include coconut since I can't participate in the taste tests of any of the recipes that call for these cookies, and it's very frustrating!

I'll pass your suggestion on to the test kitchen.

Central Scrutinizer; Cooks Talk moderator

Only connect.

knitpik's picture

That would be wonderful. Thanks, Li.

elizaram's picture

I no longer use the Famous wafers, since they contain both trans fats and HFCS, both of which have been banned from my family's diet. A homemade version would be excellent! (And probably taste much better too, LOL!)




Food-forward parents like mine served dinners of homemade falafel, Mediterranean fish stew or stir-fried beef with broccoli. To me, dishes like spaghetti and meatballs, mashed potatoes with gravy and macaroni and cheese seemed exotic and unattainable. --Julia Moskin (NYT)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

case4's picture

I think .... Alice Medrich has a recipe for chocolate waffers in her Bittersweet book. I agree with you on banning trans fats and HFCS,we have too. I'm not home to access my book, but I'll check later if you want? Cheers

elizaram's picture

I'm not home to access my book, but I'll check later if you want?



That would be great!! I volunteer to test the recipe and tell you all how it comes out. :-)




Food-forward parents like mine served dinners of homemade falafel, Mediterranean fish stew or stir-fried beef with broccoli. To me, dishes like spaghetti and meatballs, mashed potatoes with gravy and macaroni and cheese seemed exotic and unattainable. --Julia Moskin (NYT)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

case4's picture

Thanks knitpik!! elizaram that is the Alice Medrich recipe knitpik found, I double checked it with my book. I'm going to try them this w/e. cheers

knitpik's picture
Jean's picture

Oh, thank you!!



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Heather's picture

I've almost totally cleared them from my diet too. Did you happen to hear Terry Gross's interview with Michael Pollen about his new book, The Omnivore's Dilemma. It's all about the huge corn industry in the US and how they are sneaking HFCS into almost everything. And about the real costs of producing this "cheap" calorie source. Besides being extremely bad for everyone's health, it takes a lot of oil to produce and is terribly polluting.

elizaram's picture

Not only that, but it's getting hard to find non-GMO corn as well! I didn't catch the interview, but sounds like a book I'll have to check out.




Food-forward parents like mine served dinners of homemade falafel, Mediterranean fish stew or stir-fried beef with broccoli. To me, dishes like spaghetti and meatballs, mashed potatoes with gravy and macaroni and cheese seemed exotic and unattainable. --Julia Moskin (NYT)



When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.

unbaked's picture

Most stores in So Calif do the same thing, Albertsons and Vons definitely put them with the ice cream toppings (WHY?), can't recall where Ralph's puts them.

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

favorablyimpressed's picture

Famous Chocolate Wafers . . . it's one of the few cookies I buy, in fact, the only cookie I buy.  I like to serve them along side a bowl of homemade orange sherbet.  But, the last time I bought them I nearly died when I looked at the price, $4.19 for a little box! 

unbaked's picture

To take this off topic for a sec..can you share your orange sherbet recipe please? I love it and haven't found a recipe I really like yet.


 


Thanks :)

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine

favorablyimpressed's picture

To take this off topic for a sec..can you share your orange sherbet recipe please?      


It's my pleasure, and I'll even include the recipe for raspberry sherbet that is even better.  Both recipes are from Cooks Illustrated.               


                       Fresh Orange Sherbet  -- CI


Recipe By     :
Serving Size  : 0     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Fruit Desserts                  Ice Cream


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  1         tablespoon  grated zest from 1 to 2 oranges
  1                cup  sugar -- 7 oz.
     1/8      teaspoon  salt
  2               cups  orange juice -- preferably unpasteurized fresh-squeezed
  3        tablespoons  juice from 1 to 2 lemons
  2          teaspoons  Triple Sec or vodka
     2/3           cup  heavy cream


Process zest, sugar, and salt in food processor until damp, ten to fifteen 1-second pulses.  With machine running, add orange juice and lemon juice in slow, steady stream; continue to process until sugar is fully dissolved, about 1 minute.  Strain mixture through nonreactive fine-mesh strainer into medium bowl; stir in Triple Sec, then cover with plastic wrap and chill in freezer until very cold, about 40 degrees, 30 to 60 minutes.


When mixture is cold, using whisk, whip cream in medium bowl until soft peaks form.  Whisking constantly, add juice mixture in steady stream, pouring against edge of bowl.  Immediately start ice cream machine and add juice/cream mixture to canister; churn until sherbet has texture of soft-serve ice cream, 25 to 30 minutes.


Remove canister from machine and transfer sherbet to storage container; press plastic wrap directly against surface of sherbet and freeze until firm, at least 3 hours.  (Can be wrapped well in plastic wrap and frozen for up to one week.)  To serve, let sherbet stand at room temperature until slightly softened.


Source:
  "Cooks Illustrated  May/June 2004"
Yield:
  "1 quart"


NOTES : If using a canister-style ice cream machine, freeze the canister for at least 12 hours or preferably, overnight.  If the canister is not thoroughly frozen, the sherbet will not freeze beyond a slushy consistency.  For the freshes, purest orange flavor, use freshly squeezed unpasteurized orange juice.  Do not use juice made from concentrate, which has a cooked and decidedly unfresh flavor.


                     
* Exported from MasterCook *


               Fresh Raspberry Sherbet -- Cooks Illustrated


Recipe By     :
Serving Size  : 0     Preparation Time :0:00
Categories    : Fruit Desserts                  Ice Cream


  Amount  Measure       Ingredient -- Preparation Method
--------  ------------  --------------------------------
  3               cups  fresh raspberries -- or a 12 oz. package of frozen raspberries
     3/4           cup  water
  1                cup  granulated sugar (7 ounces)
     1/8      teaspoon  table salt
  3        tablespoons  lemon juice from 1 to 2 lemons
  2          teaspoons  Triple Sec or vodka
     2/3           cup  heavy cream
                         


1. In medium nonreactive saucepan, cook fresh raspberries, water, sugar, and salt over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until mixture just begins to simmer, about 7 minutes. Pass mixture through fine-mesh strainer into medium bowl, pressing on solids to extract as much liquid as possible. Add lemon juice and Triple Sec or vodka; cover with plastic wrap and chill in freezer until very cold, about 40 degrees. Do not let mixture freeze.


2. When mixture is cold, using whisk, whip cream in medium bowl until soft peaks form. Whisking constantly, add juice mixture in steady stream, pouring against edge of bowl. Immediately start ice cream machine and add juice/cream mixture to canister; churn until sherbet has texture of soft-serve ice cream, 25 to 30 minutes.


3. Remove canister from machine and transfer sherbet to storage container; press plastic wrap directly against surface of sherbet and freeze until firm, at least 3 hours. (Can be wrapped well in plastic wrap and frozen for up to one week.) To serve, let sherbet stand at room temperature until slightly softened and instant-read thermometer inserted into sherbet registers 12 to 15 degrees.


 Source:
  "Cooks Illustrated"


NOTES : In-season fresh raspberries have the best flavor, but when they are not in season, frozen raspberries are a better option. Substitute a 12-ounce bag of frozen raspberries for fresh.
makes about 1 quart  


 


 


 

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pamilyn's picture

Hey F.I. I know this is probably not your thing, but if you ever get into a bind the Hagen Dass Raspberry Sorbet is TDF.

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

favorablyimpressed's picture

. . . if you ever get into a bind the Hagen Dass Raspberry Sorbet is TDF.


It does sound good.  Thanks.  I'll be sure to look for it.

unbaked's picture

Thanks!!

'The desire to make an effort to improve the lives of those around you does not yet live in everyone, but it does live in everyone who cooks.' -Bill Penzey, one magazine