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I have it, now what do I do with it?

Ricks503's picture

Vanilla sugar that is.

 


 


" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

TracyK's picture

It's great in coffee. :-)

CT poster in bad standing since 2000.

deejeh's picture

Try mixing it with a litte cinnamon and use it for rolling snickerdoodles in.


deej


Edited 12/9/2006 1:46 pm ET by deejeh

wisekaren's picture

If you can hold off until tom'w, I will try to find time to post a great recipe from Hi-Rise bakery here in Boston. It's called "Vanilla Bean Loaves," sort of like pound cake. Outstanding. In fact, I'll never stop thinking about it now, so maybe I'll make it tom'w too!
Karen

Lee's picture

What kind of vanilla sugar do you have?  Is it in powdered form, or granulated sugar in which you buried used vanilla beans?

Ricks503's picture

granulated with buried used vanilla bean. 


It smells great, I have tried it in coffee but it did not really come thru on the flavor.


 


 


" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

 

 

" There'll be no living with her now" - Captain Jack Sparrow

Lee's picture

I sprinkle it on berries and use it in any recipe calling for sugar and vanilla.  I agree that it doesn't add a whole lot of vanilla flavor, so I don't decrease the vanilla called for in a recipe.  I recenty bought some Tahitian vanilla beans, and it'll be interesting to see if the used pods add more flavor to sugar than the Madagascar beans I usually buy.

Gretchen's picture

At my spice store in Denver they were selling lavender vanilla sugar. I'm thinking of making some with my new "stash" of vanilla beans.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Lee's picture

IIRC, there was a thread a while back about making lavender sugar. 

Gretchen's picture

Thanks. I sort of recall that also. Haven't begun to really think about it--trying to get boxes off, yanno!!

Gretchen

Gretchen
assibams's picture

Use instead of plain sugar + vanilla extract in baking.


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Risottogirl's picture

Are you thinking of the vanilla sugar that is readily available in packets in Europe?


If so, that generally has a much, much stronger vanilla flavor that what I think Rick is talking about - what he most likely has is a vanilla scented sugar, where the used beans have imparted something to the sugar.


You can use the packet vanilla sugar in place of sugar and vanilla extract, but as Lee said, I wouldn't sub the other - not strong enough.


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

assibams's picture

Actually the stuff you mean (Dr Oetker and the likes, right?) is a copy of the real thing ;-) Only they grind up some whole pods and mix with sugar. Homemakers and bakers have done this for centuries (I guess LOL): the scraped vanilla beans go into a container of very fine sugar to be used for things like Vanille Kipferl or anything else that needs some vanilla. Using the packets is just a shortcut, and an expensive one, too. I've had my container of vanilla sugar for quite a while (say 2 years), and whenever I scrape a bean, I cut it in half and into the sugar it goes. A shaking now and then releases the seeds that are still on the pods, and the vanilla flavor is very pronounced. I have around 10-15 beans for 1-2lbs of sugar.


I wouldn't use beans that have been cooked or steeped in liquid in the vanilla sugar, only scraped ones. I do however use the dry ones from the sugar if I want to infuse liquid as for rice pudding for the kids.



Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

Risottogirl's picture

I have done it for years too but have nowhere near THAT many bean to one kilo of sugar, so it would not work to sub for sugar + vanilla extract. Not strong enough :)


Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay

jyang949's picture

It's December, so I would make Vanille Kipferl, which are crescent-shaped cookies covered in vanilla sugar. Watch how fast they disappear!

Janet

wisekaren's picture

OK, here it is, from the Boston Globe a couple of years ago:

Hi-Rise's Vanilla Bean Loaves

CAKE
3 cups flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp salt
3 sticks unsalted butter, at room temp
2 1/2 cups vanilla sugar (1 split vanilla bean stirred into the sugar and left for a few days)
1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped
1 Tbsp vanilla extract
8 eggs

SYRUP
1 3/4 cups sugar
1 cup water
2 vanilla beans, split and seeds scraped

For the cake:
Heat the oven to 325°. Generously butter two 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 x 2 1/2 inch loaf pans.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt.

In a heavy-duty mixer, using the paddle, cream the butter and vanilla sugar until the mixture is pale and fluffy. Add the vanilla bean seeds to the mixture along with the vanilla extract and eggs. Beat to mix.

Add the flour mixture to the batter and beat with a few turns of the paddle until it is just smooth. With a rubber spatula, fold the batter from the bottom of the bowl into the mixture to make sure it's well blended.

Divide the batter between the pans. Bake the cakes for 30 minutes, turn the pans around, and continue baking for 25 to 40 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the cake comes out almost clean. Cool on a rack for 10 minutes. Turn the loaves out of their pans and return them to the rack.

For the syrup:
In a small saucepan over medium heat, dissolve the sugar in the water. Add the vanilla beans and stir so the seeds disperse. Remove from the heat.

Place the cakes on the rack over a baking sheet. Brush generously all over -- tops, bottoms, and sides -- with the syrup. Brush with more syrup as the cool. Cool completely and slice thickly for serving.

Karen

MadMom's picture

I just always toss used vanilla beans into my sugar, and leave them there forever.  Should I remove them after any period of time?  Will it hurt anything to leave them?  I just use it as I use regular sugar, since my big Tupperware sugar container holds a whole bag (5 lbs?) of sugar, and I don't see any distinctly vanilla flavor.  Just hate to throw the beans away.



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Risottogirl's picture

I do the same thing with a jar of sugar - just leave'em there. That is the sugar that SO uses for his cereal and coffee.


I have another container of plain sugar as well. I don't really bake much so I don't go through a lot of sugar. I think it would be hard to have enough used beans to flavor five pounds of sugar!!!


The vanilla sugar you can buy in Europe is really, really vanilla-y and it comes in little packets. Lot's of recipes there call for a "packet" of vanilla sugar.



Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor


Bobby Flay


Edited 12/10/2006 9:40 am ET by Risottogirl

Water is a great ingredient to cook with, it has such a neutral flavor - Bobby Flay