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Difficult wine pairing

PatricKinOnt's picture

I'm making Nobu's Black Cod in Miso with braised baby bok choy and #### for dinner tomorrow.  I've done some googling and I've found that a good pairing for miso is a fruity young burgundian (mind outta gutter, I mean Pinot Noir!).


Anyone have experience with this??


 




 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
shoechick's picture

Normally when I serve Black Cod, I serve a Gewurztraminer.

Cinderella is proof that shoes can change your life....

The World is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.  ~St. Augustine

BonnieinHolland's picture

yep, I'm with you there - either a Gewurztraminer or a Riesling.


cheers, Bonnie

wonka's picture

What does one serve with ####? It appears you have been sensured. Are you cooking something risque.

PatricKinOnt's picture

$hitakes, stupid filter



 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/

 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
KitchenWitch's picture

Shiitakes


2 "i"s and the filter backs off.


~RuthAnn


You don't scare me. I have a two year old.

~RuthAnn

Gretchen's picture

If you spell it right it will work also.   shiitakes

Gretchen

Gretchen
assibams's picture

Tough, indeed. Even though the white wine choices do pair well with the fish, miso and bok choy rule out Gewürztraminer and/or Riesling for me, unless you chose a wine with more sweetness (late harvest). I know, sounds terrible, but that is what we had at a restaurant, Asian-inspired foods with similar tastes as the dish you describe. We were a little reluctant, but the sommelier's choices of late harvest were spot on. You need some sweetness to balance the bitterness of the bok choy. Of course, a fruity, young Pinot Noir would work, too.


Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.

"A positive attitude may not solve all your problems, but it will annoy enough people to make it worth the effort."
Herm Albright

BonnieinHolland's picture

A touch of sweetness does help with the Asian food match, I agree.  There is late harvest ('Vendage Tardive') Gewurztraminer and Riesling from the Alsace which will have a higher sugar level than the plain stuff.   There are also a variety of styles of Riesling from Germany - from dry to sweet.  A Riesling Spatlese Trocken, for example, would do the trick - just enough sweetness to take the edge off the dryness.


cheers, Bonnie

Glenys's picture

Unfortunately using a phrase like "Asian" food is like saying white wine with fish; pairing is more successful based on the actual dish not the generalisation.

PatricKinOnt's picture

Wow, thanks for all your input. Just clear up one thing, the bok choy will be braised with re-constituted $hitakes. I can get fresh but the dried ones I get from the Asian market have a much more robust flavour, which it what I want.


As with most of you, I almost always pair Asian cuisine with either a sparkler or a slightly off dry riesling or Gwertz. I've even had a Vouvray and semi-dry Coteaux de layon  with Thai and it was great. 


The issue here is the Miso, mushrooms, and possible the bok choy, although by braising it, it looses some of it's bitterness.


But then there is the richness of the fish.. The higher acidity in the Pinot should cut through that and I'm always looking for Pinot pairings (my fav. just like Miles). 


In Dec. I'm doing a wine tasting dinner for my wine club, so this is also a "possibility" for the Pinot course.  I was just wondering if I should A, risk the nice fillet that has been patiently marinating for 2 days, and B, the fine bottle of wine to go with it.


Is it to risky? I've read about pairing Nebbiolo with sushi (Nori), so how much of a stretch can this be?


sigh..


 




 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
Glenys's picture

Actually, many wine experts mention Nobu-like miso dressings in their contemporary wine pairing matches.  You're going to have to go for a medium Pinot sans any fruitiness, heavy on the mushroomy notes.


Don't take this the wrong way but I don't think you're going to find a suitable Pinot in the Ontario Pinot's.  Sadly it's not one of your strong points. 


 

PatricKinOnt's picture

Sadly it's not one of your strong points.


Typically, that is true. Although, I did try a few this past summer (at the winerys) that were worthy of consideration but they fell off the list due to the $40 price point.  Not that I mind spending that or more on a good pinot, but it opens up a world of options.  I've got several pinots in my cellar from all over the world and the ones that match the Niagara Pinots are typically $10 less.


I have found during the last year that they quality/price point of the "Heartbreak Grape" to has really come around. I expect it's due to experience and technology, which is good for all of us because Pinot Noir is really something special and quite universal as a food wine.


FYI, at the moment, I have 0 bottles of canadian wine in my cellar.  I did have some rieslings (Feilding single vinyard) and an Icewine or 3 that got used up on the deck when the weather was nicer.


All in all, I went for a value Champers and turned into a tapas style dinner with Shrimp Kabobs, Tuna Carpaccio, raw oysters, and of course the  Sablefish.  DW was tickled pink!!!


 


 




 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
Glenys's picture

Ice wine on the deck. Never really thought about it that way. I'm a huge noble rot fan but ice wine for me is like that often lauded dessert that just tends to be overly sweet without distinction. I like the balance of a Barsac or even the happy, reasonable Late Harvest wines. Not that an ice wine can't be fun, it just doesn't do it for me, I think partly because it's so not food friendly, which is another problem.
Bubbly however, how could you go wrong??

PatricKinOnt's picture

I have attempted some icewine / dessert pairings in the past and find that the Cab Franc version is the most food friendly.  Most likely due to the raisiny notes.


Typically though I like to let it stand on it's own. Actually, I had a 1999 Barrel Fermented Gwertz icewine this summer that insisted it stand on it's own. Dessert in a glass which I found wonderful, DW liked it but it was a little much for her.


As with the B.A. sector, I love Sauternes.  Never had a Yquem tho... not yet anyway!  I also find Hungarian Tokay a nice change as well.  Bet then again, if the wine is of good quality, and not a huge fruit bomb, I'll probably love it.  I find my taste and interest lies in playing the entire field and finding food to match the wine more than vise versa.


Cheers,


P.




 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
 
A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject.
by Sir Winston Churchill
And I'm a fanatic about Wine, Food, Scotch, and Coffee.....:-/
Glenys's picture

If you're making out your holiday wish list it's a great fall for wine lovers in the book world. The Dornenburgs, who gave us Culinary Artistry and Becoming a Chef, have out their new What to Drink With What You Eat. It's a beautifully done, easy to use, great quotes and notes from lots of chefs etc. $42.95 in Canada.
Just out this fall, on the same lines and just as easy to use and read, is Evan Goldstein's A Perfect Pairing. I think I have the name correct but for sure it's Evan's. That book is being recommended to all the sommelier students by its leading program instructors. It's about the same price.

Regality's picture

Thanks for the references.  I have just added both to my very long Amazon wish list.  (The second book is Perfect Pairings.)

 


“For me, patriotism is the love of one’s country, while nationalism is the hatred of other peoples.”–Dmitri Likhachev


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Gretchen's picture

Thank you. A good book(s) for DD.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Glenys's picture

I'm with you and CA on the Pinot Noir. What's a more classic pairing than 'shrooms and Pinot?
Another way to good could be a full bodied Chardonnay (for weight) that had toasty nuances, picking up the sesame and weighing in with the mouthfeel of the fish.

CulinaryArtist's picture

I frequently defer to Pinot Noir with Asian flavors, it's always very food friendly in my mind. Not a big fan of sweet whites but they would be better than the less sweet.

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com