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Food to Freeze

Amy's picture

Food to Freeze (post #32696)

My sister-in-law is pregnant with twins and on complete bed rest. I'm going to stay with her for a week, to keep her company, clean the house and cook.

What can I freeze to leave for her after I'm gone? I've made the "make 3 freeze 2 lasagne" from FC. Any other ideas? I don't normally make casseroles, but...

chiquiNO's picture

Meatballs in gravy, vegetable soup minus the potatoes, Stuffed Chicken Breasts...I do it with fresh spinach leaves, chopped and mixed with cream/feta cheese, and chopped fresh herbs and garlic.  Wrap in bacon, dust with flour and bake 375* .  Cool and slice, reassemble and freeze.  Great over angel hair with a light Alfredo sauce and sauteed mushrooms.  My personal favorite is stuffed bell peppers or meatloaf.  Can be frozen in small portions or make individual meatloafs.  Also, small homemade mac and cheese casseroles!!


Chiqui from way down yonder in New Orleans


Edited 6/20/2006 1:38 pm by chiquiNO

 

Gretchen's picture

Just about any casserole you make will freeze. The only thing that does not freeze well is potatoes in things like stew. They get a little mealy.


Other things--chicken pot pie, meatloaf (uncooked), twice baked potatoes (add some chopped ham or cooked sausage, veggies, etc to make a main dish), soups, country fried steak (just made this so it was at the top of my head!), various pasta dishes (the ziti with Italian sausage and mozzarella on here is very good).


 


Gretchen
Gretchen
CookiM0nster's picture

Everything Gretchen said, especially soups. If she's planning on nursing she's going to get very thirsty, and anything that adds additional liquid to her diet will help.

In addition I'd recommend freezing a supply of bran muffins or any kind of reasionably healthy snack-type food seh can grab with one hand.

Gretchen's picture

I agree about sauces like marinara or spagetti, but the ziti recipe really needs to just all go together and get frozen.  Foil pans are great for freezing. 

Gretchen

Gretchen
wonka's picture

I agree with everyone who wrote regarding all sorts of casseroles. The muffins are a really great idea. While I was nursing my triplets I drank alot of Boost or Ensure after I had finished nursing my litter, it help to keep my energy up. I know that isn't a freezer  thing but very helpful for recovering from the births.

Aberwacky's picture

Wow.  You nursed triplets.  You are my hero.


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Aberwacky's picture

One tip--you might try freezing the meals in single-serve portions.  The Rubbermaid take-along containers work great for this.


That way, they can just defrost what they want for that meal and heat it up in the microwave, and aren't necessarily stuck eating one casserole for several days.  It's also faster for those times when you are trying to get  a quick meal in.


Macaroni and cheese freezes very well, as do other baked pastas.  Soups are good, cooked meatloaf (with mashed potatoes and green beans), baked chicken in sauce with veggies, etc.


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
wonka's picture

Serving sizes are a GREAT idea. I did that for my grandfather, years ago, when my grandmother died. He didn't have to cook for 2 months.

Aberwacky's picture

I do this for our lunches--easy to grab in the morning on the way to work, and have started doing it for my parents since my mother more or less stopped cooking and I discovered their freezer was full of frozen "tv" dinners.  Every few months they bring me the empty containers and I trade them for full ones.  Dad loves getting home-cooked meals, and Mom doesn't have to cook.


Leigh


 


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Gretchen's picture

At Costco there are now these "plastic" containers with tops that are safe in the oven. Good for larger casseroles.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Aberwacky's picture

Glad made some (maybe they still do), and I've used those, but there were a lot of restrictions on how to use them that made them a little frustrating to use.  I've gone back to the foil pans with lids for giveaway frozen dishes that need to be baked.


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Gretchen's picture

Yes, I thnk they were Glad. I've never used them, but just saw them in passing one time.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Aberwacky's picture

They looked like they'd be great, but in the end were a bit too much trouble for me--particularly since I was giving them away, and had to include special instructions on using them when I did.


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
Sabra's picture

I have 3 awesome easy soup recipes that freeze well . . . I'll post the 3 separately.


Bon appetit!  Sabra


                                  CREAM OF PUMPKIN SOUP WITH CURRY


 


 


4  T    butter


½  c    chopped onion


3  T    curry powder


6  c     chicken broth


1  lge.  can pumpkin puree (29 oz)


¼  c     packed brown sugarsalt, white pepper, nutmeg (approx. ½ t each)


1  c     heavy creamchopped fresh chives or parsley for garnish


 


·        In a 6-8 quart saucepan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. 


·        Add the onion and sauté until translucent.


·        Add the curry powder and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes.


·        Reduce heat to medium and stir in the chicken broth, pumpkin, brown sugar, salt, pepper and nutmeg; cook for 10 minutes.


·        Stir in the heavy cream and cook for an additional 5 minutes.  Adjust seasoning to taste.


·        For a thick soup, cook 10 minutes longer, or add more     broth if we want it thinner.  Adjust the seasoning.


·        Pour the soup into a blender or food processor and purée until smooth and creamy. (If the onion is chopped small enough, I don’t blend it.)


 


 

Sabra's picture

Here's number 2!  This one is a litte more time consuming to make but full of great veggies!


COUNTRY STYLE TOMATO SOUP


 


2     c     tomatoes, finely chopped**          1     t     dried parsley


½     c     celery, finely chopped               ½     t     dried basil


¼     c     carrots, finely chopped              ½     t     dried marjoram


¼     c     onions, finely chopped               1           bay leaf


1     T    butter                                 ½     c     chicken stock


1     t     sugar                                  1     T    chicken base


 


2     T    butter                       ¼  t paprika                     


2     T    flour                         ¼  t white pepper


2     c     half and half cream


                       


1.  Add the first 12 ingredients in a large pot or saucepan.  (I use a food processor to chop them relatively finely.)  Simmer about 15 minutes until vegetables are soft.


2.  In a separate smaller saucepan, melt the 2 T of butter, add the flour, and stir over medium heat for about 3 minutes. 


3.  Slowly add the cream, stirring, keeping the consistency smooth.  Add the cream mixture to the vegetables. 


4.  Add the paprika and pepper.  Stir and heat on simmer for about 10 minutes.


 


Recipe can be doubled, tripled or quadrupled.  Freezes well (good and takes less space to freeze if only if only do half the cream mix.


 


** 6 plum tomatoes, chopped = 2 cups (6 lbs. plum tomatoes = 10 cups chopped)


Doubling this recipe makes about 8 cups of thick soup–using ½c milk & ½c heavy cream.


  


 

Sabra's picture

Then the last one . . . this also makes a great pea puree!


P.S. When I was in Belgium a few weeks ago, I made all of these soups for my 85-year old mother-in-law's freezer!  She's happy!


GINGER PEA SOUP


 


3     T          butter


2"                ginger, peeled and sliced thinly


1     lge.        Yukon potato, peeled & thinly sliced or chopped


1     lge.        onion, thinly sliced or chopped


2     c          chicken broth


2     T          chicken base


++               chicken broth


3     10-oz.    pkg. frozen petite peas, THAWED


 


1.    Melt butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat.


2.    Add ginger slices to butter and sauté over low heat until ginger is limp, but not browned.


3.  Add potato, onion, and chicken broth, and chicken base.  Simmer until vegetables have softened.


4.  Turn off heat and add all but 1 cup of THAWED peas.


5.  Purée mixture in blender or food processor.


6.  Add the 1 cup of whole peas.


FREEZE AT THIS POINT


7.  Thaw soup mixture over low heat.  Add more chicken stock to desired consistency.


8.  If you like the ginger flavor and want to "dress" it up a bit, saute some chopped ginger in butter, and put on top of the soup. 


 


THIS RECIPE MAKES ABOUT 6 CUPS OF THICK PUREE THEREFORE ABOUT 9-10 CUPS OF SOUP.


 

MadMom's picture

They all look delicious.  Hope I can find them when winter comes around (summer just seems too hot for hot soups!)



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RuthWells's picture

Every few months they bring me the empty containers and I trade them for full ones. 


While working full time and with a baby in the house?  You are a saint.


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

Aberwacky's picture

It's not so hard--I just make a little extra whenever I'm cooking, and freeze it up for them. By the time we see each other again, I have a cooler's worth. 


Leigh


Bacteria is the only culture some people have.

"Happiness does not depend on outward things, but on the way we see them." 
-Leo Tolstoy
RuthWells's picture

Ah, you misunderstand -- doing any cooking AT ALL qualifies you for sainthood, in my book!  ; )


 


Ruth Wells


"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

Ruth Wells

"Gardening is the only unquestionably useful job."
 - G.B. Shaw

www.lemonade-and-kidneys.blogspot.com

www.ruthssweetpleasures.com

http://www.pkdcure.org/Default.aspx?TabI...

CulinaryArtist's picture

As a Personal Chef I freeze meals all the time.  The suggestion that you do it in individual servings is perfect idea.  Good things to work with are any protein with a sauce.  Cook a meatloaf and slice it to store in the containers and add sauce over the top.


Boneless chicken breasts sauteed or grilled and sauced are great, one of my clients' favorites is caramelized red onions with balsamic vinegar!   Beef or Lamb Stews. Roasted veggies. etc.


 


Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST


http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Jimbo the TRAVELING CULINARY ARTIST

http//:www.travelingculinaryartist.com

Sabra's picture

And . . . when you are done making whatever you end up making . . . freeze them as you make them, when frozen, remove them from their container and put into freezer plastic bags and return to the freezer.  Easy for her to them pop into a microwave dish, thaw, cook, and add things to it!

Gretchen's picture

Easier than freezer containers--quart zip-loc bags. Just stack 'em like books.


Somewhere here there is a lucious red lentil curry soup.


Gretchen
Gretchen
pamilyn's picture

Mmmmmm. THAT sounds good. I missed it some how. If you find it could you link me to the post? I will try and do a search rightnow. Thanks. Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

pamilyn's picture

I found the one Meryl posted. Is that the one you are reffering to? Thanks, Pamilyn

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

The purpose of Art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls

elizaram's picture

Evelyn's moussaka freezes beautifully, and is even tastier once thawed.




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When I was young, all my friends were imaginary. Now that I'm older, all my friends are virtual.