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Nice Thai chicken recipe

Geoffchef's picture

Nice Thai chicken recipe (post #32209)

In case anyone caught a quick glimpse, this is a second try at posting this - scan and sizing difficulties. It's the lower recipe on the page.
Tried this dish tonight, from Charmaine Solomon's 1989 Thai cookbook.
Very nice flavours, I will be making it again. I used some chicken tenders I had in the freezer, followed the recipe pretty exactly except for Demarara instead of palm sugar. For my own taste I will add a little heat and tang next time, some Sambal or bird chilis and maybe a splash of rice wine vinegar. I think most people will find the flavours nicely balanced as they are.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Syrah's picture

I may have that book. The format looks really familar to me. I love the sound of the duck curry.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Marcia's picture

Geoff, I have several of Solomon's books but not the Thai one. These recipes look good to me, but would you recommend buying the cookbook? Believe me, I don't need another, but I seem to have a renewal of "cookbook lust" coming on. LOL


I only need a very slight push, since I've already checked and the book is still in print.

Geoffchef's picture

Well if you already have some, you know that she uses ingredients which can be hard to come by, at least around here. I have her big compendium "Asian Cookery" as well, and it's a bit of a problem. Still, all the recipes I have tried from her books have been good, with the proviso that I like more heat than she usually puts in. But that's easily fixed.
I've been looking for more good books on Asian food - do you have any recommendations for me?

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Marcia's picture

Too late...I already ordered it along with something that I have difficulty believing I don't have...a copy of Karen Hess's, The Carolina Rice Kitchen. I was just in a cookbook purchasing mood. :)


I can recommend all of the books by the team of Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid, my favorite of which is Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet, but I've not seen their latest so no comment there. MC is right about David Thompson's tome, but I don't know that I'd recommend it, except for reading purposes since you have difficulty finding ingredients.


Do you have any particular type of Asian in mind? I tend to favor Thai, although I'm very fond of South Indian cookery. I have a book that I like very much but the name and author escape me at the moment. I looked around a bit but will have to perform a more though search.


See, that just proves I need no more cookbooks!


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


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Geoffchef's picture

I bought "Hot, Sour, Salty Sweet" quite recently. Gorgeous book, but I haven't managed to wrap my head around the methods in it yet. I find I have to dip into a book like this a few times before I cook something from it, sort of getting myself into the gestalt or whatever.
It's an interesting process that perhaps others here might comment on. The first time I go through a book on a cuisine I am not well versed in, I tend to focus on recipe titles and ingredients, picking up on familiar flavours I already like. This is a skim, usually in the bookstore.
The second reading is looking for the first recipe I want to prepare, or looking for a recipe for a principal ingredient I'm building a meal around. This deepens my familiarity with the book and its methods, but may or may not lead to cooking from it.
After more glancing and reading of sections, which may take months, I will finally take the plunge and make something from one or more of the recipes. Slowly things from a new book will become part of my repertoire.
When I was younger and life was simpler I had more time to pursue narrowly focused culinary obsessions. Now I have to budget my energy more carefully.
I notice that not a lot of our confreres here have jumped in on this subject, so I wonder how widely available Ms. Solomon's books are and how well they are received.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Marcia's picture

I think you'll find the recipes in Hot, Sour, Salty, Sweet very accessible. I don't care for the large size of the book, but that's a given with this team, since the beautiful pictures are an integral part of their work.


I used to do quite a bit of Chinese cooking, and my favorite Hunan recipes were from Henry Chung's Hunan Style Chinese Cookbook. Mean Chef has many of his recipes posted. The book is likely out of print.


There are two excellent older Sichuan cookbooks, neither of which I can lay my hands on at the moment. We have a designated library, but it's awaiting shelving, so many books are still packed away. The others are all over the place. It's odd, but sometimes one I've been searching for will turn up in an unexpected spot.


Another that's probably out of print is Fire and Spice by Jacki Passmore. It's a mixture of different Asian cusines, and I found the ones we tried to be excellent.

Geoffchef's picture

Meanie's so reliable. If those Sichuan ones turn up let me know.
Thanks Marcia.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Marcia's picture

I can't go digging in boxes in the basement so I tried google instead. One of the books is called Mrs. Chiang's Szechuan Cookbook, by Chiang Jung-fen, and Ellen and John Schrecker and was first published in 1976. It seems to be available still, and I've cooked many things from it in the distant past to family acclaim. Tastes do change, so I can't give it a current recommendation, but I think you'd be pleased with it.


Barbara Tropp, in her The Modern Art of Chinese Cooking (you should have this, Geoff) mentions the other Szechuan book I'm thinking of. If I remember correctly, it was written by a graduate student of Tropp's aquaintance, and is a slim but useful volume. The only thing I remember is that the author's first name was Richard and the Szechuan Pork and Pickled Vegetable Soup was the easiest and best I've ever had. I can post an approximation of the recipe, if you like, but I don't know if you can get Szechuan pickled vegetables.


I also have a fairly recent publication called Land of Plenty, by Fuchsia Dunlop which received raves from many quarters. It's authentic Sichuan but doesn't appeal to me as much as the others.

Gretchen's picture

I think there is a very new book on Szechuan cooking that is supposed to be the definitive (for now) book. Of course, can't remember the name--it's by a woman.

Gretchen

Gretchen
Marcia's picture

I'm pretty sure you're thinking of Fuchsia Dunlop's, Land of Plenty. She's about to come out with a new one soon.

Geoffchef's picture

Printing your message and will be shopping. Thanks Marcia!

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

Marcia's picture

Have fun shopping, Geoff!


I remembered another book I adore which is Chinese-French fusion, more or less. It was written by a Philadelphia restauranteur named Susanna Foo and is called Susanna Foo's Chinese Cuisine. Her restaurant used to be spectular but from what I've heard recently it's gone downhill, but the cookbook is a gem.


One of the recipes that made me think of you is red, ripe jalapenos stuffed with highly seasoned ground pork, which is to die for.

Geoffchef's picture

I have to be a little careful. Just bought the Silver Spoon at Costco, and my first order from The Good Cook just showed up, sadly sans Breath of a Wok which was unavailable. DW is making those "Another cookbook?!" noises.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

beebuzzled's picture

DH makes no such noises. I use every cookbook I own and he enjoys very good meals because of them. It's a good trade-off.

Why is the rum always gone?  Captain Jack Sparrow
Marcia's picture

Drat! On my last visit to Costco, Silver Spoon wasn't available there. Not what I need at all and I can sympathize with your plight.


I can't seem to join The Good Cook since I'm overwhelmed by the choices and am unable to make up my mind. It's a good way to save money but frustrating.

Jean's picture

I had some of that chicken leftover that I wanted to stretch into another meal, so I cut it into bite sized pieces and set it aside.

In  a skillet I swozzled a little OO, added a medium sized onion, chopped up, some diced green, red and yellow peppers, and some sliced mushrooms. Cooked until  onion was transparent. Mixed 1 1/2 cups chicken stock with 1/2 T fish sauce, 1/2 T sugar, 1 1/2 T. minced fresh ginger, 1/2 tsp of hot curry powder and a good splash of hot sauce and 1 T of corn starch. Dumped it in the pan with the leftover chicken and sauce it was cooked in, (your recipe from this thread) heated it up and served it over the leftover rice. He loved it. 'Make sure there's enough to have it again tomorrow.' His idea. I might be getting the hang of this.


I was originally going to garnish it with some fresh basil- Yes it's growing in my windowsill-- but forgot and it obviously didn't need it. :) I'm fixing chicken that my DH likes!  Whoopeeeeee.


If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

We're having Kalonji chicken tonight.  Of course, when I asked Ray what he wanted for dinner, he said "Something simple."  That's what he always says.  Translate that to mean no spices, no muss, no fuss, preferably a rotisserie chicken from the local grocery store.  So, I dragged out my little metal cups, filled them with half a dozen spices, and proceeded to cook Vij's Kalonji chicken.  That'll teach him!  Bless his heart, he'll complain, but he'll eat it. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

Should have looked for Kalonji seeds in Madison. I don't see them listed at Penzey's.  Where did you get yours, or do you sub something else?

If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
MadMom's picture

Jillsifer sent me some, although I had some already...Nigella seeds...which I didn't realize were the same thing.  Do you want me to send you some?  They are quite good.  I actually splurged and had the chicken over rice.  It was very good.  Of course, I don't need the rice, but guess once in a while won't hurt me.  Now, the second glass of wine which DH poured, and the second helping of chocolate...that's another story. 



Not One More Day!
Not One More Dime! Not One More Life! Not One More Lie!

End the Occupation of Iraq -- Bring the Troops Home Now!

And Take Care of Them When They Get Here!

Jean's picture

No, don't send any. Chances are pretty good that I can pick some up next time I go to GR.  Thanks, though.

If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
transona5's picture

Penzeys sells them under their other name - Charnushka.

 

Jean's picture

Thanks for that, Michael.

If lawyers are disbarred and clergymen defrocked, doesn't it  follow  that electricians can be delighted, musicians denoted, cowboys  deranged,  models deposed, tree surgeons debarked, and dry cleaners depressed?  
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/

A  clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
http://www.thebreastcancersite.com/
help to provide free mammograms for women in need
transona5's picture

You're welcome!

 

Geoffchef's picture

Good on ya!

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

SuB's picture

I'd like to try this recipe - DH and I are hooked on Thai red curry, which we have discovered only recently (sigh).  Thanks for sharing.


One question: what do you buy when you buy red curry paste?  I mean, is there a brand you favor or a specific name to look for?  Is it Thai or is it generic?  I've seen bottled Thai-style red curry "simmer sauce" at Trader Joe's (kinda expensive) but I'd like to try making my own.  I think I need to go to an Asian market but I'm a little intimidated since I have no idea what to ask for - total Asian food novice here.



Cheers, Sue B.


The older I get, the better I was.


Edited 2/22/2006 3:24 am by SuB

Cheers, Sue B.

The older I get, the better I was.

Syrah's picture

I would say skip the simmer sauce, and just buy the pastes. I have no particular brand but I look for those that are not obviously marketed to the West... (no pretty labels or complete English). Of course I buy mine at the Asian grocery and the girls there are always available for stupid Anglo questions. The amount of times I've bought something that just looked cool to ask them "What do I do with this?". They always seem most amused by me. LOL.

"The truth will set you free. But first, it will piss you off"
Gloria Steinem

"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and, above all, confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be obtained." -Marie Curie

Geoffchef's picture

Seconding Syrah here. Head for Chinatown.

 


ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary


 

 

ADAM'S APPLE, n.
A protuberance in the throat of man, thoughtfully provided by Nature to keep the rope in place.
Ambrose Bierce - The Devil's Dictionary

 

transona5's picture

Do you need any curry paste recipes? Mean has two here:


http://recipecircus.com/cgi-bin/recipes/category.cgi?category=Condiment&login=MEANCHEF


My recipe for the red is identical except it makes only 1/2 cup as opposed to 1 1/4 cup. I can also give you recipes for green curry paste, yellow curry paste, and Massaman curry paste. If you're going to through the effort of getting the ingredients such as galangal, coriander root, lemongrass, shrimp paste, etc. you might as well make several kinds, as they keep in the fridge for three months.

 

hsnow73's picture

If you don't have access to an Asian store, then use the one made by Thai Kitchen.  It tastes good, but just expensive--~$3.00 for 4 ounces.   This way, if you don't care for the dish, you can be sure that it's not because of the curry paste.  The most popular brand used by Asians is Mae Ploy, which costs about the same, but for 14 ounces.  While you're at it, a decent fish sauce is the one with the 3 crabs on the label.

SuB's picture

Thanks Geoff and everyone for the information and the recipes.  I'm not ready to make my own curry pastes yet but I'm sure I can manage these recipes when I get back from the Asian market.  Homemade red curry, yum!


Cheers, Sue B.


The older I get, the better I was.

Cheers, Sue B.

The older I get, the better I was.